Drama

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Drama

ABLEWA Stage A

Year Stage Description

In Stage A students are exposed to drama to assist them to attend to and explore the world around them with as much independence as possible. They experience how drama can represent the world and represent ideas about the world. They experience dance and are encouraged to use gestures and body movements to react and respond to the world around them. They experience drama as audiences.

Students become aware of role and situation as they listen and respond as characters. They explore voice and movement to create role. They learn about focus and react to an element of a drama. They participate as an audience and experience various dramas.

As they experience drama, students are exposed to a range of cultures, times and locations. Students learn about safety in dramatic play and in interaction with other actors.

Stage A Content Descriptions

Explore and Represent Ideas

Experience elements of dramatic play with support (VCADRE001)

Drama Practices

Use facial expression to communicate a feeling or reaction (VCADRD002)

Present and Perform

Be involved in sharing ideas through drama (VCADRP003)

Respond and Interpret

React to drama (VCADRR004)

Achievement standard

By the end of Stage A, students participate in dramatic play. They react to aspects of drama they make, perform and view.



ABLEWA Stage B

Year Stage Description

In Stage B, students experience and respond to drama. They explore how drama can represent the world and make drama to represent elements of the world. They share their drama with peers and experience drama as audiences.

Students experience different roles and situations related to real life and everyday experiences. They explore voice and movement to create role. They experience drama as a performer and audience.

As they explore drama, students experience drama from a range of cultures, times and locations. Students learn about safety in dramatic play and personal space through their interaction with other actors.

Stage B Content Descriptions

Explore and Represent Ideas

Use structured dramatic play to explore ideas (VCADRE005)

Drama Practices

Use voice, facial expression, and/or movement to imitate role and situation (VCADRD006)

Present and Perform

Participate in drama performances to communicate a feeling and/or events (VCADRP007)

Respond and Interpret

Respond to own and others drama (VCADRR008)

Achievement standard

By the end Stage B, students make and share drama through dramatic play and improvisation.

Students communicate likes and dislikes in response to elements of drama they make, perform and view.



ABLEWA Stage C

Year Stage Description

In Stage C, students explore drama. They learn about how drama can represent the world and that they can make drama to represent their ideas about the world. They share their drama with peers and experience drama as audiences.

Students become aware of role and situation as they listen and respond as fictional characters. They explore sound and movement to create role. They learn about focus and identifying the main idea of the drama. As audiences they recognise that the purpose of drama is to share it with others.

As they experience drama, students draw on drama from a range of cultures, times and locations. Students learn about safety in dramatic play and in interaction with other actors.

Stage C Content Descriptions

Explore and Represent Ideas

Explore ideas for characters in dramatic play (VCADRE009)

Drama Practices

Use voice, facial expression and/or movement to imagine a role and situation (VCADRD010)

Present and Perform

Present drama that communicates ideas, feelings and/or experiences (VCADRP011)

Respond and Interpret

Share responses to drama by answering yes/no questions and explore where and why people make drama (VCADRR012)

Achievement standard

By the end of Stage C, students make and share simple drama that communicates an idea, feeling and/or experience.

Students communicate ideas about drama and reasons why people share drama by answering yes/no questions.



ABLEWA Stage D

Year Stage Description

In Stage D, students explore drama. They learn about how drama can represent the world and that they can make drama to represent their ideas about the world. They share their drama with peers and experience drama as audiences.

Students become aware of role and situation as they listen and respond as characters. They explore voice and movement to create role. They learn about focus and identifying the main character and location of the drama. As audiences they recognise that the purpose of drama is to share it with others.

As they experience drama, students draw on drama from a range of cultures, times and locations. Students learn about safety in dramatic play and in interaction with other actors.

Stage D Content Descriptions

Explore and Represent Ideas

Explore how characters express ideas in dramatic play (VCADRE013)

Drama Practices

Use voice, facial expression, movement and/or space to express ideas and feelings about their world (VCADRD014)

Present and Perform

Present drama that communicates major elements of stories and/or experiences (VCADRP015)

Respond and Interpret

Respond to drama and describe some of the characteristics they observe (VCADRR016)

Achievement standard

By the end of Stage D, students make and share drama that communicates major elements of stories or experiences.

Students provide a simple explanation about the characteristics of drama they make, perform and view.



Pre-primary year Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year Level Description

In Pre-primary, learning in Drama builds on the dispositions of learning developed in the early years.

Students, through purposeful play, respond to stimuli to create drama and develop improvisation skills. They are introduced to the elements of voice and movement to create drama, offering and accepting ideas as they improvise, using simple stories.

Students experience drama as performers and audience members, engaging in both spontaneous and structured play to communicate stories; they explore the purpose of drama.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore the different places where drama can be seen or heard in the community.

Making

Ideas

Use of stimuli (photos, sounds or music) to develop dramatic action about the real and imagined worlds (ACADRM027)

Skills

Exploration and experimentation of two (2) elements of drama:

  • voice (loud, soft)
  • movement (big, small)

to create drama (ACADRM028)

Simple stories based on stimuli and available technologies (ACADRM029)

Development of improvisation skills (accepting offers) to develop dramatic action (ACADRM028)

Performance

Performance of improvised drama that communicate ideas to an audience (ACADRM029)

Performance skills (facing the audience) when sharing drama with peers (ACADRM029)

Responding

Audience behaviour (being attentive, responding appropriately) when viewing drama (ACADRR030)

Different places and occasions where drama is seen or heard in the community (ACADRR030)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students respond to stimuli with simple drama ideas. They use voice and/or movement based on stimuli for an audience. Students follow some game routines and exercises to create drama ideas. They consciously face the audience using some performance skills in drama.

Students outline feelings about uses of voice, movement and other aspects in their own drama and the drama of others. They outline briefly different places and occasions where drama is seen or heard in the community.



Year 1 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year Level Description

In Year 1, learning in Drama builds on the dispositions of learning developed in the early years.

Students explore personal experiences to create drama and develop improvisation skills. They are introduced to the element of role and continue to experiment with voice and movement to create their drama.

Students experience the roles of performers and audience members, learning performance skills and audience behaviour. They have the opportunity to explore the different places where drama is performed.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore the key moments in drama they view and make.

Making

Ideas

Use of dramatic action to sequence events to communicate an idea or message (ACADRM027)

Skills

Exploration and experimentation of three (3) elements of drama:

  • voice (loud, soft, varying loud and soft)
  • movement (big, small, use of facial expressions)
  • role (fictional character)

to create drama (ACADRM028)

Use of known stories and personal experiences to create drama with simple objects and available technologies (ACADRM029)

Improvisation skills (contributing to the progression of action) to develop dramatic action (ACADRM028)

Performance

Performance of planned and spontaneous drama that expresses feelings, moods, ideas and experiences to an audience (ACADRM029)

Performance skills (performing towards the audience, raising chin for good eye lines) when sharing drama with peers (ACADRM029)

Responding

Audience behaviour (paying attention to the development of a story) when viewing drama (ACADRR030)

Personal responses expressing ideas and feelings to key moments in drama they view and make (ACADRR030)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students use some dramatic action in drama. They use some voice and movement based on stimuli for an audience. Students follow some performance routines to prepare drama. They usually acknowledge the audience using some performance skills in drama.

Students outline their feelings about key moments of voice, movement and other aspects in their own performance and the performance of others. They outline different places where drama is performed and some of the functions of these uses.



Year 2 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year Level Description

In Year 2, learning in Drama builds on the knowledge and skills developed in the early years.

Students explore personal events and fictional stories to create drama. They continue to develop improvisation skills, exploring possibilities for voice, movement and role. Students are introduced to the element of situation.

Students experience drama as performers and audience members, presenting scenes in which they apply drama narratives to link the action with an ending. Students view drama based on unfamiliar stories.

As they make and respond to drama, students experiment with the elements of voice, movement, role and situation. Students explore reasons why people make drama.

Making

Ideas

Use of dramatic action to sequence events communicating an idea, message or story (ACADRM027)

Skills

Exploration and experimentation of four (4) elements of drama:

  • voice (loud, soft, varying loud and soft; pace and pitch)
  • movement (big, small; use of facial expressions; gestures; posture)
  • role (fictional character; listening and responding in role)
  • situation (establishing a fictional setting and relating to it in role)

to create drama (ACADAM028)

Development of drama to communicate important personal events or fictional stories using objects, puppets, images and/or available technologies (ACADRM029)

Improvisation skills (establishing a situation) to develop dramatic action and ideas (ACADRM028)

Performance

Performance of drama to an audience demonstrating story structures to set the scene, link action and create an ending (ACADRM029)

Performance skills (suitable openings and conclusions to performances, appropriate stage crosses) when sharing drama with familiar audiences (ACADRM029)

Responding

Audience behaviour (responding to interactive elements) where students view drama that uses different styles and unfamiliar stories (ACADRR030)

Personal responses using the elements of voice and movement in drama they view and make (ACADRR030)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students explore some dramatic action to present some drama narratives. They use some voice and movement in improvised drama to create drama ideas. Students follow specified rehearsal processes to prepare and present drama ideas. They demonstrate audience awareness using performance skills in drama.

Students outline drama ideas supported by the use of voice and movement in performance. They outline some reasons why people make drama.



Year 3 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year Level Description

In Year 3, students extend their understanding of role and situation as they create improvised and devised drama.

Students begin to experiment with selected forms and styles when improvising or devising drama. They continue to develop improvisation, voice and movement skills. Students are introduced to the elements of space, character and time.

Students experience drama as performers and audience members. They begin to use rehearsal processes to support audience engagement and continue to learn appropriate responses to the drama of others.

As they make and respond to drama, students identify and reflect on the elements of drama used in a performance. Students have the opportunity to experience drama from a range of cultures, times and locations.

Making

Ideas

Improvised and devised drama based on narrative structures in familiar drama styles (ACADRM031)

Skills

Exploration and experimentation of seven (7) elements of drama:

  • voice (loud, soft, varying loud and soft; pitch variation; pace; volume)
  • movement (facial expressions and gestures to create belief in character and situation)
  • role (taking on the point of view of a fictional character; listening and responding in role; adopting a role and maintaining focus)
  • situation (establishing and sustaining a fictional setting)
  • space (establishing a clear setting)
  • character (communicating character traits; developing relationships between characters)
  • time (sense of time to create belief in drama)

when creating improvised or devised drama (ACADRM032)

Improvisation skills (breaking patterns) to develop drama (ACADRM032)

Performance

Rehearsal processes (to improve the flow of the performance) to support audience engagement (ACADRM033)

Performance skills and audience awareness (where performers use focus and control) when performing drama styles (ACADRM033)

Responding

Appropriate responses to, and respect for, drama of others as performers and audience members (ACADRR034)

Responses that involve identifying and reflecting on the use of the elements of drama, using drama terminology (ACADRR034)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students explore dramatic action to present drama to an audience. They use voice and movement in devised or improvised drama to create simple roles and drama narratives. Students use rehearsal processes to prepare drama. They demonstrate focus to engage an audience in drama.

Students outline the elements of drama in performance and the connection with some drama ideas. They outline some features of drama in different cultures and places.



Year 4 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year Level Description

In Year 4, students extend their understanding of role and situation, as they continue to explore ideas through improvisation.

Students continue to explore the elements of drama and selected drama forms and styles to communicate ideas using role, situation, space, character and time. They are introduced to relationships and how relationships influence character development.

Students experience drama as performers and audience members. They continue to use rehearsal processes to enhance audience engagement and shape the drama for an audience.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore dramatic narratives and reflect on the meaning and purpose of their drama and the drama of others. They reflect on, and respond to, the ideas in drama from different cultures.

Making

Ideas

Improvised and devised drama based on narrative structures in selected drama styles (ACADRM031)

Skills

Exploration and experimentation of eight (8) elements of drama:

  • voice (loud, soft, varying loud and soft; pitch variation; pace; volume)
  • movement (facial expressions and gestures to create belief in character and situation)
  • role (taking on the point of view of a fictional character; listening and responding in role; adopting a role and maintaining focus)
  • situation (establishing and sustaining a fictional setting)
  • space (establishing a clear setting)
  • character (communicating character traits; developing relationships between characters)
  • time (sense of time to create belief in drama)
  • relationships (how relationships influence character development)

when creating improvised or devised drama (ACADRM032)

Improvisation skills (working with complications) to develop drama (ACADRM032)

Performance

Rehearsal processes (to improve transitions between scenes) to enhance audience engagement (ACADRM033)

Performance skills and audience awareness (where the performers use focus and control) when performing drama styles (ACADRM033)

Responding

Considered responses to, and respect for, the drama of others as performers and audience members (ACADRM034)

Responses that involve identifying and reflecting on the meaning and purpose of their own and others’ drama, using drama terminology (ACADRM034)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students explore, through improvisation, dramatic action to present drama to an audience. They use voice, movement and role to create drama in devised or improvised drama to create dramatic narratives. Students use rehearsal processes in different groups to explore transitions and address audience engagement. They demonstrate focus and control to engage an audience in drama.

Students identify and reflect on the meaning and purpose of their own drama and the drama of others. They identify ideas in drama from different cultures. Students use some drama terminology.



Year 5 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year Level Description

In Year 5, students begin to refine and experiment with the elements of drama to communicate improvised, devised and scripted drama.

Students continue to use the elements of drama and selected drama forms and styles to communicate meaning, including the use of voice, movement, role, situation, space, character, time and relationships. They are introduced to mood and explore drama narratives and ideas to create dramatic action. Students begin to explore creating drama based on scripts.

Students experience the roles of performers and audience members. They work together, giving and receiving feedback, to improve drama to engage an intended audience.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore the purpose of drama and how the elements of drama are used to communicate meaning. They have the opportunity to experience drama from a range of cultures, times and locations.

Making

Ideas

Dramatic structures to sequence how a story is opened, how events are presented (mood and tension elements) and key details to help the audience understand dramatic meaning (ACADRM035)

Skills

Experimentation and refinement of ten (10) elements of drama:

  • voice (loud, soft, varying loud and soft; pitch variation; pace; volume; clarity)
  • movement (facial expressions and gestures to create belief in character and situation)
  • role (taking on the point of view of a fictional character; listening and responding in role; adopting a role and maintaining focus)
  • situation (establishing and sustaining a fictional setting)
  • space (establishing a clear setting)
  • character (communicating character traits; developing relationships between characters)
  • time (sense of time to create belief in drama)
  • tension (factors that contribute to suspense in stories; tension in characters' relationships)
  • mood (describes the feelings and attitudes, often combined of the roles or characters involved in dramatic action)
  • relationships (how relationships influence character development)

when creating improvised, devised or scripted drama (ACADRM036)

Improvisation skills (creating climax and dénouement) to enhance drama (ACADRM036)

Performance

Rehearsal processes (giving and receiving feedback; working together) to improve drama to engage an intended audience (ACADRM037)

Performance skills and audience awareness (where the performers control the focus) to convey meaning to the audience (ACADRM037)

Responding

Responses that explain the purpose of drama and how the elements of drama are used to communicate meaning, using drama terminology (ACADRR038)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students use improvisation skills and dramatic action to present drama to an audience. They use voice, movement, role and relationships to create drama in devised, improvised or scripted drama. Students use rehearsal processes in different groups to develop dramatic narratives. They demonstrate awareness of guiding the audience focus in performance.

Students outline elements of drama that relate to dramatic meaning in performance. They outline the role of drama in different cultures and times. Students use some drama terminology.



Year 6 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year Level Description

In Year 6, students refine and experiment with the elements of drama and selected drama forms and styles, considering how feedback can be used to enhance improvised, devised and scripted drama. Students are introduced to script formatting and conventions.

Students experience drama as performers and audience members. They develop their performance skills to establish connections and build trust with the audience.

As they make and respond to drama, students explore how dramatic narratives and mood communicate meaning. They examine the factors that influence drama in different cultures, times and contexts.

Making

Ideas

Dramatic action (the driving force and forward motion of drama to create dramatic meaning) driven by narrative structure and dramatic tension (ACADRM035)

Skills

Experimentation and refinement of ten (10) elements of drama:

  • voice (loud, soft, varying loud and soft; pitch variation; pace; volume; clarity; projection)
  • movement (facial expressions and gestures to create belief in character and situation)
  • role (taking on the point of view of a fictional character; listening and responding in role; adopting a role and maintaining focus)
  • situation (establishing and sustaining a fictional setting)
  • space (establishing a clear setting)
  • character (communicating character traits; developing relationships between characters)
  • time (sense of time to create belief in drama)
  • tension (factors that contribute to suspense in stories; tension in characters' relationships)
  • mood (describes the feelings and attitudes, often combined of the roles or characters involved in dramatic action)
  • relationships (how relationships influence character development)

when creating improvised, devised or scripted drama (ACADRM036)

Script formatting and conventions, including planning and documentation

Improvisation skills (finding a resolution and signalling a conclusion) to enhance drama

Performance

Rehearsal processes (the consideration of feedback) to improve drama performances to engage an audience (ACADRM037)

Performance skills and audience awareness (where performers make connections and build trust with the audience) (ACADRM037)

Responding

Factors that influence drama in different cultures, times and contexts (ACADRR038)

Responses that explain how the elements of drama and production elements are used to communicate meaning in drama, using drama terminology (ACADRR038)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students use improvisation skills, dramatic action and/or narrative to present dramatic meaning to an audience. They use voice, movement, role/character and relationships to create some dramatic meaning in devised, improvised or scripted drama. Students use rehearsal processes in different groups to develop dramatic narratives for a purpose.

Students describe elements of drama and dramatic meaning in performance of their work and the work of others. They describe some factors that influence drama in different cultures, times and contexts. Students use some general drama terminology.



Year 7 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year Level Description

In Year 7, Drama students will be given an opportunity to plan, develop and present drama to peers by safely using processes, techniques and conventions of drama. Drama will be improvised, or taken from appropriate, published script excerpts (e.g. Australian or world drama), using selected drama forms and styles (Note: students will have an opportunity to present a scripted drama and improvisation performance at least once over Year 7 and Year 8). Student work in devised and/or scripted drama is the focus of informal reflective processes using generalised drama terminology and language.

Teachers are required to address knowledge and skills in Drama through one or more of the forms or styles below. Other forms and styles may be used in addition to teach knowledge and skills in Drama.

Drama forms and styles for Year 7: restoration comedy, circus, Kathakali, medieval theatre or ritual theatre.

Making

Voice and movement

Voice and movement techniques for selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM043)

Preparation techniques for voice and movement for selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM043)

Drama processes and the elements of drama

Drama processes through exploration of one or more elements of drama (role, character and relationships; voice and movement; space, time and situation; mood, atmosphere and dramatic tension) to establish dramatic meaning and action-audience relationships (ACADRM042)

Drama forms and styles

Script interpretation of a scene or section through the elements of drama to create mood and reinforce themes (ACADRM040)

Extended improvisation exploring personal themes based on research and selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM040)

Drama conventions

Drama structures based on episodic structures and non-linear dramatic storytelling (ACADRM042)

Improvisation conventions (establishing scenarios and role/character) (ACADRM043)

Design and technology
Self-management and group management skills and processes

Effective group work processes (problem-solving, listening skills) in drama (ACADRM042)

Responding

Drama reflections

Reflective processes on their own and others’ work, the impact on meaning of the use of the elements of drama in performance and general drama terminology and language (ACADRM045)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students make use of processes, including improvisation and role preparation, and some elements of drama to create devised or scripted drama. They demonstrate, on occasion, awareness in performance of a selected drama performance style and/or spaces of performance to present dramatic meaning.

Students use specified reflective processes to outline links between choices made in performance and dramatic meaning or audience responses. They use generalised drama terminology.



Year 8 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year Level Description

In Year 8, Drama students will be given opportunities to plan, refine and present drama to peers by safely using processes, techniques and conventions of drama. Drama will be based on extended improvisations, or taken from appropriate, published script excerpts, using selected drama forms and styles (Note: students will have an opportunity to present a scripted drama and improvisation performance at least once over Years 7 and 8). Student work in devised and/or scripted drama is the focus of informal reflective processes using more detailed drama terminology.

Teachers are required to address knowledge and skills in Drama through one or more of the forms and styles below. Other forms and styles may be used in addition to teach knowledge and skills in Drama.

Drama forms and styles for Year 8: readers theatre, children's theatre, naturalism or realism.

Making

Voice and movement

Voice and movement techniques for selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM043)

Preparation techniques for voice and movement for selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM043)

Mime techniques (mapping the imaginary space before the performance and for audience during the performance) in drama (ACADRM043)

Drama processes and the elements of drama

Drama processes through exploration of one or more elements of drama (role, character and relationships; voice and movement; space, time and situation; mood, atmosphere and dramatic tension) to establish dramatic meaning and impact on audience (ACADRM042)

Drama forms and styles

Script interpretation of a scene or section through the elements of drama to highlight mood and reinforce selected themes (ACADRM040)

Design and technology

Design and technology to support dramatic impact and audience enjoyment of the theatrical experience (ACADRM044)

Self-management and group management skills and processes

Responding

Drama reflections

Reflective processes on their own and others’ work, the impact on audience responses of the use of the elements of drama in performance and use of specific drama terminology and language (ACADRM045)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students engage in processes, including improvisation and role preparation, to shape appropriate elements of drama for devised or scripted drama. They usually demonstrate awareness, in performance, of a selected drama performance style and spaces of performance to present dramatic meaning and to engage with an audience.

Students use specified reflective processes to make links between choices made in performance and dramatic meaning or audience responses. They appropriately use generalised drama terminology in responses.



Year 9 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that in Years 9 and 10 the study of the Arts is optional.

Year Level Description

In Year 9, Drama students will be given opportunities to refine their knowledge and skills to present drama as an event, by safely using processes, techniques and conventions of drama. Students develop drama based on devised drama processes and appropriate, published script excerpts (e.g. Australian drama pre-1960 or world drama), using selected drama forms and styles. Student work in devised and scripted drama is the focus of reflective and responsive processes supported through scaffolded frameworks using drama terminology and language.

Teachers are required to address knowledge and skills in Drama through one or more of the forms and styles below. Other forms and styles may be used in addition to teach knowledge and skills in Drama.

Drama forms and styles for Year 9: melodrama, neoclassical drama, multi-formed devised drama commedia dell'arte, or Kabuki theatre.

Making

Voice and movement

Voice and movement techniques for selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM050)

Preparation techniques for voice and movement for selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM050)

Mime techniques (isolation of body parts; clear signalling of engaging with, or releasing, objects) in drama (ACADRM050)

Drama processes and the elements of drama

Drama processes through shaping one or more elements of drama (role, character and relationships; voice and movement; time, space and situation; mood, atmosphere and dramatic tension) to shape dramatic meaning and engage audiences in different relationships (ACADRM049)

Approaches to characterisation suited to the demands of the text or devised drama (ACADRM048)

Drama forms and styles

Script interpretation of a scene or section through the elements of drama to shape and manipulate mood and communicate themes to audience (ACADRM047)

Design and technology

Design principles (balance, contrast, repetition) used to make meaning and add to the experience of theatre (ACADRM051)

Self-management and group management skills and processes

Responding

Drama reflections

Reflective writing, on their own and others’ work, evaluating the impact of choices in drama making and using specific drama terminology and language (ACADRR052)

Drama responses

Analytical writing on viewed live performances (live or digital copies of live performances) focusing on the elements of drama to make meaning (ACADRR053)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students select processes, including improvisation and rehearsal, to shape appropriate elements of drama for devised and scripted drama. They demonstrate awareness, in performance, of a selected drama performance style, spaces of performance and specified design and technologies appropriate to dramatic meaning and to engage with an audience.

Students use reflective and analytical processes to describe choices made in performance and their effect on dramatic meaning. They accurately use generalised drama terminology in responses.



Year 10 Syllabus

The syllabus is based on the requirement that in Years 9 and 10 the study of the Arts is optional.

Year Level Description

In Year 10, Drama students will be given opportunities to develop their knowledge and skills to present drama for purposes and wider external audiences, safely using processes, techniques and conventions of drama. Students develop drama based on devised drama processes and taken from appropriate, published script excerpts (e.g. Australian drama post-1960 or world drama), using selected drama forms and styles. Students will have opportunities to research devised drama and read in selected script excerpts in context. Student work in devised and scripted drama is the focus of reflective and responsive processes. Students are encouraged to develop their use of extended answer forms and interviews, using drama terminology, language and different forms of communication, based on their own drama and the drama of others.

Teachers are required to address knowledge and skills in Drama through two or more of the forms and styles below. Other forms and styles may be used in addition to teach knowledge and skills in Drama.

Drama forms and styles for Year 10: Grotowski's Poor Theatre, Youth Theatre, Contemporary Aboriginal Theatre, Theatre of the Absurd or Butoh.

Making

Voice and movement

Voice and movement techniques for selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM050)

Preparation techniques for voice and movement for selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM050)

Mime techniques (choosing the level of precision of movement needed when telling a story) in drama (ACADRM050)

Drama processes and the elements of drama

Drama processes through combining the elements of drama (role, character and relationships; voice and movement; time, space and situation; mood, atmosphere and dramatic tension) used by selected drama practitioners such as Rudolf Laban, Augusto Boal or Cecily O'Neill to manipulate dramatic meaning and audience relationships (ACADRM049)

Drama forms and styles

Script interpretation, based on a reading of the complete text, of an extended scene or section to manipulate mood and interpret themes for audience (ACADRM047)

Devised drama exploring international or global themes based on research and selected drama forms and styles (ACADRM047)

Design and technology

Design principles (balance, contrast, repetition, pattern) selected to make meaning and add to the experience of theatre (ACADRM051)

Self-management and group management skills and processes

Responding

Drama reflections

Reflective writing, on their own and others’ work, analysing choices in drama making and using precise drama terminology and language (ACADRR052)

Drama responses

Analytical writing using different forms of communication on viewed live performances (live or digital copies of live performances), focusing on the elements of drama and design and technology to make meaning (ACADRR053)

Oral communication

Oral communication (explaining in an interview, the reasons behind choices in drama making) (ACADRR052; ACADRR053)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students use contemporary processes, including improvisation and approaches to rehearsal, to select and shape the elements of drama for devised and scripted drama. They demonstrate awareness in performance of drama forms and styles, spaces of performance and design and technologies to communicate dramatic meaning and to impact on audience.

Students engage in reflective and analytical processes to make links between the choices made in performance and their effect on dramatic meaning and impact on audience. They accurately use a range of generalised drama terminology in their oral and written responses.



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