Humanities and Social Sciences

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Humanities and Social Sciences

ABLEWA Stage A

The Stage A curriculum develops student’s awareness of a place on a personal local scale. Places will range in size from a part of a room or garden to community place. They are supported to use their senses to explore the tangible characteristics of a place such as the sound, smell, feel of significant features, and environmental and human characteristics.

Learning about their own place and building a connection with it contributes to their sense of identify and awareness. They start to explore significant places they are in, and what it is like. Students experience different places and their purposes.

The idea of a place, its purpose, features and location (a part of the concept of space) are introduced through personal experience and reinforced through the use of multisensory and multimodal texts, images, maps, photos and models. The emphasis in Stage A is on the significant place in which they live and their reaction to them.

Key question:

  • What do I experience in this place?

Personal Present History

The curriculum at Stages A to D provides a study of personal and family histories. Students learn about their own history and that of their family; this may include stories from different cultures and other parts of the world. As participants in their own history, students build on their knowledge and understanding of how the past is different from the present. At Stage A the focus is on the present.

Key questions:

  • What is my name and what do I look like?
  • What people are familiar and support me?
  • What objects are familiar to me?

Knowledge and understanding

Geography

Places and our connections to them

Experience the distance and location of familiar places (VCGGK007)

Experience personal places and their features represented on large-scale maps and models (VCGGK008)

Experience their connection to a place in Australia and across the world (VCGGK009)

Experience local area dreaming stories and country/places (VCGGK010)

Experience weather and seasons (VCGGK011)

Experience and react to the sensory elements of a places (VCGGK012)

Experience the purpose of or the special event/s of a space (VCGGK013)

React to features and activities of a familiar place (VCGGK014)

History

Personal histories

Who they are and what they look like (VCHHK006)

The people in their family (VCHHK007)

Indicate what event was first in a routine daily event (VCHHK008)

Similarities and differences within their daily life (VCHHK009)

Community histories

Commemorate significant events (VCHHK010)

Experience significant places and sites (VCHHK011)

Exposure to the cultural or spiritual importance of significant places and sites (VCHHK012)

Experience the use of technology in their lives (VCHHK013)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Geography

Place, space and interconnection

Experience places that are important for specific people and related activities (VCGGC003)

Data and information

Experience geographical information by using their senses (VCGGC004)

React to images or sensory elements which represent preferred personally significant places (VCGGC005)

React to an element of a place (VCGGC006)

History

Chronology

Recognise personally significant objects from childhood and now (VCHHC001)

Historical sources as evidence

Explore a source that describes a person (VCHHC002)

Explore their own perspective on events in their routine daily life (VCHHC003)

Continuity and change

Explore objects from the past and present (VCHHC004)

Historical significance

Experience narratives about a person or the past (VCHHC005)

Achievement standard

By the end of Stage A, students recognise some personally significant places. They select preferred objects through reaching towards, accepting or rejecting actions.

Students react to the familiar features of some personally significant places.

By the end of Stage A, students experience routine events within their daily life and react to significant chances. They react to personally significant people, objects and sites. They participate and react to significant events, which are commemorated.

Students react to stories, images and representations of familiar events and stories about them. They react to significant objects of their past and present.



ABLEWA Stage B

The Stage B curriculum focuses on places I live in and developing students’ awareness of the places they experience daily. They are supported to develop their curiosity of place by exploring some of the significant features of the place and what they do in each. They are developing an emerging understanding of special awareness such as location, direction and distance. Places will range in size from part of a room, to a building or area.

Students are encouraged to explore the space within a place. They use their senses to explore the tangible characteristics of a place such as the features, its environmental and human characteristics. Learning about their own place and building a connection with it contributes to their sense of identify and awareness. Students experience different places and their purposes.

The idea of a place, its purpose, features and location (a part of the concept of space and distance) are introduced through experiences and reinforced through the use of multi-model texts, images, maps, photos and models. The emphasis in Stage B is on the significant places in which they live and what they do in each place.

The key questions for Stage B are:

  • What do I like in a place?
  • What do I dislike in a place?

Personal and Present Family History

The curriculum at Levels A to D provides a study of personal and family histories. Students learn about their own history and that of their family; this may include stories from different cultures and other parts of the world. As participants in their own history, students build on their knowledge and understanding of how the past is different from the present. At Level B the focus is on present and recent history.

Key questions:

  • What people are part of my immediate family?
  • What stories do other people have about my recent past?
  • How can stories and events of my present and recent past be told and shared?

Knowledge and understanding

Geography

Places and our connections to them

Moving to different places and recognising some features/places on the way (VCGGK021)

Familiar places identified through images at a variety of scales (VCGGK022)

The connection of self to other places in Australia and across the world (VCGGK023)

Experience dreaming stories of the local country/places and their features (VCGGK024)

Observe and identify major weather type (VCGGK025)

The major features of a place (VCGGK026)

Experience specific activities in a place (VCGGK027)

Places used regularly at school and activities I do there (VCGGK028)

History

Personal histories

Who the people in their immediate family are (VCHHK019)

The structure of their immediate family (VCHHK020)

Indicate the events at the beginning of the day, at midday and evening (VCHHK021)

Similarities and differences within their daily life from day to day (VCHHK022)

Community histories

Awareness of significant commemorative events and ways they can assist with preparation (VCHHK023)

Explore significant places and site, and events associated with them (VCHHK024)

Participate in celebrations and special events of a cultural or spiritual place or site (VCHHK025)

Explore different technologies used to make their daily life better (VCHHK026)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Geography

Place, space and interconnection

Explore the features of a place and demonstrate a preference for certain features (VCGGC015)

Explore the location of regular places and activities in school (VCGGC016)

Explore the importance of places and participate in special events related to specific places (VCGGC017)

Data and information

Assist to collect geographical data and information (VCGGC018)

Use images to identify a familiar place (VCGGC019)

Respond to elements of a space using positive and negative response (VCGGC020)

History

Chronology

Recognise significant events during their lifetime (VCHHC014)

Historical sources as evidence

Explore a range of sources that show families over time (VCHHC015)

Explore peoples perspective to events within their daily life (VCHHC016)

Continuity and change

Explore features of objects from the past and present (VCHHC017)

Historical significance

Assist to construct a narrative about a person or a shared past event (VCHHC018)

Achievement standard

By the end of Stage B, students can identify some familiar places using photos, images or augmentative alternative communication when asked. They will select to view a multimodal text about a preferred place.

Students experience the familiar features and purposes of places and the representation of these features, purposes and their location as words, gestures, images, pictures and photos. They begin to indicate objects and places they like from a field of two to three choices. They begin to follow everyday language related to direction and location.

By the end of Stage B, students identify immediate family members. They recognise some significant events. Students respond to images of personal, family and sites of significance.

Students assist to sequence significant parts of recent familiar events. They can identify themselves at different milestones in their past. They assist to create a story about their past using a range of texts, objects and images.



ABLEWA Stage C

The Stage C curriculum focuses on local places I live in and developing student’s exploration and curiosity of personally significant places. Students will build on their knowledge of the local space around personal significant places. Students will draw on their own experience to help them understand places around them. They are learning about their own place and building a connection to places and are developing a sense of identify and awareness. Students experience different places and their purposes. They record and reflect on significant community facilities and their experiences at these places.

Students are developing an emerging understanding of spatial concepts through structured experiences within various places and their environment. The idea of a place, its purpose, features and location (a part of the concept of space) are recorded through the use of multimodal texts, images, maps, photos and models. They assist in the caring for and maintenance of a place. They are introduced with vocabulary related to place, space, and interconnections. The emphasis in Stage C is on significant places and their local area, what they do in these places.

The key questions for Stage C are:

What places do I live in?

  • What do I identify in this place?
  • What they do in this place?

Personal and Recent Celebrations and History

The curriculum at Stages A to D provides a study of personal and family histories. Students learn about their own history and that of their family; this may include stories from different cultures and other parts of the world. As participants in their own history, students build on their knowledge and understanding of how the past is different from the present. At Stage C the focus is on present and recent past history.

Key questions:

  • What people are part of my family?
  • What is my history?
  • What stories do other people tell about major milestones in my past?
  • How can events and stories of the past be told and shared?

Knowledge and understanding

Geography

Places and our connections to them

Recognising and labelling familiar places in the school using a jointly constructed map (VCGGK035)

The connection of their family and peers to other places in Australia and across the world (VCGGK037)

Explore names and places of local spaces and their Dreaming stories (VCGGK038)

Connection of weather to seasons (VCGGK039)

The major features of a place and its activities (VCGGK040)

What I do in this space (VCGGK041)

Places regularly used at school and the location, and activities undertaken (VCGGK042)

History

Personal histories

Who the people in their family are (VCHHK032)

The people and their name in the family (VCHHK033)

Distinguish between events within the day and the past (VCHHK034)

Similarities and differences in their daily life over time (VCHHK035)

Community histories

How events are celebrated and how to assist to prepare and participate in personal, school and community events (VCHHK036)

Link significant local sites and people to events (VCHHK037)

Link cultural or spiritual sites to their events or history (VCHHK038)

Explore changes in technology and the difference between each (VCHHK039)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Geography

Place, space and interconnection

Identify a familiar place and present findings using locational vocabulary, photos and visuals (VCGGC029)

Link activities to a location (VCGGC030)

Link places to their related activities and special events (VCGGC031)

Data and information

Collect geographical data and information (VCGGC032)

Use images to match a familiar place to a significant feature (VCGGC033)

Indicate how they use a space based on geographical information (VCGGC034)

History

Chronology

Sequence parts within a significant event (VCHHC027)

Historical sources as evidence

Explore a range of sources that describe an event in the recent past (VCHHC028)

Explore their perspective on how things have changed from past and present in their daily life (VCHHC029)

Continuity and change

Compare features of objects from the recent past and present (VCHHC030)

Historical significance

Assist to construct a narrative about a significant person or past event (VCHHC031)

Achievement standard

By the end of Stage C, students label personally significant places and what they do in the place. Students demonstrate a few ways they can care for a familiar place by creating a simple rule for this place.

Students observe the familiar features of places and assist to represent these features and their location on group constructed pictorial maps and models. They share observations about a place using simple sentences and show the people who can be found in a place.

Students can independently locate some significant spaces within a significant local place and they begin to communicate using direction and location.

By the end of Stage C, can identify keys routines and events within their daily life.  Students identify key members of their family and how they have changed over time. They recognise some important family events and some objects used in celebrations. They recognise some significant artefacts or objects associated with significant commemorative events or sites in local community.

Students sequence three elements within familiar recent events in order. They identify key milestones in their past. Students relate a story about their past using a range of texts, objects or images. They can identify objects and technology which has change over time.



ABLEWA Stage D

The Stage D curriculum focuses on the features of places where students live focusing on developing student’s awareness, understanding and purpose of a place. Students are encouraged to be curious about a place and explore its local area. They use their senses to explore the tangible characteristics of a place such as the spaces, features and environmental and human characteristics.

Learning about a place and building a connection with it, contributes to the student’s sense of identify and awareness. They continue to develop a connection and understanding of significant places they are in and what it is they like. Students experience and develop their curiosity about different places and their purposes. The idea of a place, its purpose, features and location (a part of the concept of space) are explored through the use of multimodal texts, images, maps, photos and models.

The emphasis in Stage D is on the significant places students regularly visit, their major characteristics, purpose and how students connect to each place. They also explore and how a place is affected by natural factors, and the environmental issues associated with the place.

The key questions for Stage D are:

  • What places do I regularly visit?
  • What are the major features of each place?
  • What does the place look like?
  • What is my special space in this place?

Personal Past History

The curriculum at Stages A to D provides a study of personal and family histories. Students learn about their own history and that of their family; this may include stories from different cultures and other parts of the world. As participants in their own history, students build on their knowledge and understanding of how the past is different from the present. At Stage D the focus is on present and past history.

Key questions:

  • What is my history and what objects relate to this?
  • What stories do other people tell about my past?
  • How can stories of my past be told and shared?

Knowledge and understanding

Geography

Places and our connections to them

Locating familiar places and label place and purpose (VCGGK049)

How places can be defined at a variety of scales (VCGGK050)

The connection of their school and local community to other places in Australia and across the world (VCGGK051)

The Countries/Places that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people belong to in the local area (VCGGK052)

Ways weather and seasons are described (VCGGK053)

The major features of a place and their location (VCGGK054)

What people do in specific spaces (VCGGK055)

Places used regularly in the community, their location, activities undertaken in this place and frequency of visits (VCGGK056)

History

Personal histories

Who the people in their family are and how they are related to me (VCHHK045)

The different family groups in my class and what they have in common (VCHHK046)

Distinguish between 'today’, ‘tomorrow’ and ‘yesterday’ (VCHHK047)

Similarities and differences between their life and the life of their parents and grandparents (VCHHK048)

Community histories

How they and their family celebrate past events that are important to them (VCHHK049)

Explore and sequence the history of a significant place, person or building or site (VCHHK050)

Explore the significance of cultural or spiritual places to us today and to people in the past (VCHHK051)

Explore technologies of the past and today and what people like and why (VCHHK052)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Geography

Place, space and interconnection

Identify familiar places and their features, using photos and locational vocabulary (VCGGC043)

Describe the location of a familiar place and the related activities (VCGGC044)

Identify personally significant places and their connection and importance (VCGGC045)

Data and information

Reconstruct geographical data and information (VCGGC046)

Model or draw key features of a familiar place (VCGGC047)

Answer yes/no questions about a place based on geographical observations and information (VCGGC048)

History

Chronology

Sequence significant family milestones (VCHHC040)

Historical sources as evidence

Explore a range of sources that describe families in the past (VCHHC041)

Explore peoples perspectives about change to daily life (VCHHC042)

Continuity and change

Identify and compare features of objects used by the family from the past and present (VCHHC043)

Historical significance

Develop a narrative about a significant family member and/or place (VCHHC044)

Achievement standard

By the end Stage D, students label familiar routine places and some of their features and the related activities undertaken in these places. They recognise places can have a special purpose or connection for some people. Students reflect on their learning to suggest ways they can care for a familiar place.

Students observe the familiar features of places and represent these features and their location on jointly constructed pictorial maps and models. They can identify how they travel to a place and one or two key features of the journey. They recognise that places can be represented by an image or on a map.

They follow and use simple everyday language to describe direction and location to explain where a place is or to locate a place or object

By the end of Stage D, students identify similarities and differences between families in their class. They identify many important family events and indicate how they were commemorated. Students use images to describe a significant family, personal event, site or person of significance.

Students sequence their key milestones in order. They can sequence key events related to a significant person, building or site. They can sequence routine events. Students answer questions about their past by using a variety of sources provided. Students relate a narrative about their past using objects, images, and perspectives of other (parents and grandparents).



Pre-primary year syllabus

Year Level Description

In Pre-primary, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Geography and History.

Students have the opportunity to pose and respond to 'who', 'what', 'when', 'where' and 'why' questions. They collect, sort, represent and record information into simple categories. Students explore, play and investigate, and communicate their understandings through activities such as writing, painting, constructions or role-plays.

Students gain a sense of location and learn about the globe, as a representation of the Earth, on which places can be located. There is a focus on developing students' curiosity of their personal world, with connections made between the early childhood setting and the local community. In the context of developing a sense of identity and belonging, students investigate the features of familiar places, why and how places are cared for, and explore what makes a place special.

Students engage in stories of the past, particularly in the context of themselves and family. This may include stories from different cultures and other parts of the world. They perceive that the past is different from the present and understand the many ways in which stories of the past can be told. In the early years, students have the opportunity to explore their heritage, background and traditions.

Civics and Citizenship does not commence until Year 3. The Early Years Learning Framework provides opportunities for students to engage in civics and citizenship concepts, such as developing a sense of community; an awareness of diversity; and an understanding of responsibility, respect and fairness.

Economics and Business does not commence until Year 5. The Early Years Learning Framework provides opportunities for students to engage in economics and business concepts, such as exploring natural and processed materials, and consumer decisions.

Knowledge and understanding

Geography

People live in places

The globe as a representation of the Earth on which Australia and other familiar countries can be located (ACHASSK014)

The representation of familiar places, such as schools, parks and lakes on a pictorial map (ACHASSK014)

The places people live in and belong to (e.g. neighbourhood, suburb, town, rural locality), the familiar features in the local area and why places are important to people (e.g. provides basic needs) (ACHASSK015)

The reasons some places are special to people and how they can be looked after, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples' places of significance (ACHASSK017)(ACHASSK016)

History

Personal and family histories

Who the people in their family are, where they were born and raised and showing how they are related to each other, using simple family trees (ACHASSK011)

The different structures of families and family groups today (e.g. nuclear, only child, large, single parent, extended, blended, adoptive parent, grandparent) and what they have in common (ACHASSK011)

How they, their family and friends commemorate past events that are important to them (e.g. birthdays, religious festivals, family reunions, community commemorations) (ACHASSK012)

How the stories of families and the past can be communicated and passed down from generation to generation (e.g. photographs, artefacts, books, oral histories, digital media, museums) and how the stories may differ, depending on who is telling them (ACHASSK013)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Identify prior knowledge about a topic (e.g. shared discussion, think-pair-share)

Pose and respond to questions about the familiar

Explore a range of sources (e.g. observations, interviews, photographs, print texts, digital sources)

Sort and record information and/or data into simple categories (e.g. use graphic organisers, drawings)

Analysing

Process information and/or data collected (e.g. sequence familiar events, answer questions, discuss observations)

Explore points of view (e.g. understand that their point of view may differ from others)

Represent information gathered in different formats (e.g. drawings, diagrams, story maps, role-plays)

Evaluating

Draw conclusions based on discussions of observations (e.g. answer questions, contribute to guided discussions)

Participate in decision-making processes (e.g. engage in group discussions, make shared decisions)

Communicating and reflecting

Share observations and ideas, using everyday language (e.g. oral retell, drawing, role-play)

Develop texts (e.g. retell, describe personal stories)

Reflect on learning (e.g. drawings, discussions)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students pose and respond to questions, and recognise that there are a variety of sources from which information can be collected. They use simple categories to organise information and sequence familiar events. Students explore points of view, represent information in different ways and begin to draw simple conclusions. They share observations and ideas when participating in the decision-making process. Students develop simple oral texts, and reflect on what they have learnt using language, gesture and other non-verbal modes.

Students recognise that countries, such as Australia, and familiar places are represented on a globe or a map. They describe the features of places that are familiar to them. Students identify the interconnections that people have with familiar places and recognise why some places are special and need to be looked after. They identify similarities between families and suggest ways that families communicate and commemorate significant stories and events from the past.



Year 1 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 1, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Geography and History.

Students have the opportunity to investigate different ways of collecting information and/or data through sources such as books, people and photos. They learn how narratives can be used to communicate and represent their changing understandings in multiple ways.

In the early years, students have the opportunity to develop an appreciation for both natural and constructed environments as they understand how places are cared for and consider who should provide this care. Their understanding of place is further developed through investigating maps as a visual representation of Earth, as they begin to locate geographical divisions.

The concept of continuity and change is extended through exploring how family life has changed or remained the same over time, and how the present is similar to, or different from, the past. The understanding of time as a sequence is developed in the context of the present, past and future.

Civics and Citizenship does not commence until Year 3. The Early Years Learning Framework provides opportunities for students to engage in civics and citizenship concepts, such as developing a sense of community; an awareness of diversity; and an understanding of responsibility, respect and fairness.

Economics and Business does not commence until Year 5. The Early Years Learning Framework provides opportunities for students to engage in economics and business concepts, such as exploring natural and processed materials, and consumer decisions.

Knowledge and understanding

Geography

Places have distinctive features

The location of the equator and the northern and southern hemispheres, including the poles (ACHASSK031)

The natural, managed and constructed features of places, their location on a pictorial map, how they may change over time (e.g. erosion, revegetated areas, planted crops, new buildings) and how they can be cared for (ACHASSK031)

How weather (e.g. rainfall, temperature, sunshine, wind) and seasons vary between places, and the terms used to describe them (ACHASSK032)

The activities (e.g. retailing, recreational, farming, manufacturing, medical, policing, educational, religious) that take place in the local community which create its distinctive features (ACHASSK033)

History

Present and past family life

Differences in family sizes, structures and roles today (e.g. work outside the home, domestic chores, child care), and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHASSK028)

How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time (e.g. 'a long time ago'; 'then and now'; 'now and then'; 'old and new'; 'tomorrow') as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance (e.g. birthdays, holidays, celebrations, seasons) (ACHASSK029)

The differences and similarities between students' daily lives and life during their parents' and grandparents' childhoods (e.g. family traditions, leisure time, communications) and how daily lives have changed (ACHASSK030)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Reflect on current understanding of a topic (e.g. think-pair-share, brainstorm)

Pose questions about the familiar and unfamiliar

Locate information from a variety of provided sources (e.g. books, television, people, images, plans, internet)

Sort and record selected information and/or data (e.g. use graphic organisers, take keywords)

Analysing

Identify relevant information

Process information and/or data collected (e.g. sequence information or events, categorise information, combine information from different sources)

Explore points of view (e.g. understand that stories can be told from different perspectives)

Represent collected information and/or data in to different formats (e.g. tables, maps, plans)

Evaluating

Draw conclusions based on information and/or data displayed in pictures, texts and maps (e.g. form categories, make generalisations based on patterns)

Participate in decision-making processes (e.g. engage in group discussions, make shared decisions, share views)

Communicating and reflecting

Present findings in a range of communication forms, using relevant terms (e.g. written, oral, digital, role-play, graphic)

Develop texts, including narratives, that describes an event or place

Reflect on learning and respond to findings (e.g. discussing what they have learned)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students pose questions, locate, sort and record collected information and/or data from provided sources. They identify and process relevant information and/or data by categorising, sequencing events and exploring points of view. Students use different formats to represent their information, and draw simple conclusions. They participate in decision-making processes by contributing to group discussions. Students share their findings in a range of ways, and develop simple texts, using some relevant terms. They reflect on what they have learnt using oral and/or written forms.

Students describe how spaces are used in their local community. They categorise the natural, managed and constructed features of places. Students describe how the features of places can be cared for and changed over time. They describe the weather and seasons for selected places, and locate the equator and the northern and southern hemispheres. Students describe how families have changed or remained the same over time. They describe how daily lives change over generations, and consider the personal significance of events in the present, past and future.



Year 2 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 2, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Geography and History.

Students develop their understanding and application of skills, including questioning and researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to their daily learning experiences and to investigate events, developments, issues and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

The concepts of place, space and interconnection are expanded through exploring the links with people and places, both locally and globally. The concept of scale is introduced as students explore the hierarchy of scale. They further develop a mental map of the world and of where they are located in relation to other places.

Students are given the opportunity to develop their historical understanding through the key concepts of continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance. These concepts are investigated within the context of exploring the history of their local area and why the past is important to the local community, and therefore worthy of preservation.

Civics and Citizenship does not commence until Year 3. The Early Years Learning Framework provides opportunities for students to engage in civics and citizenship concepts, such as developing a sense of community; an awareness of diversity; and an understanding of responsibility, respect and fairness.

Economics and Business does not commence until Year 5. The Early Years Learning Framework provides opportunities for students to engage in economics and business concepts, such as exploring natural and processed materials, and consumer decisions.

Knowledge and understanding

Geography

People are connected to many places

The location of the major geographical divisions of the world (e.g. continents, oceans) in relation to Australia (ACHASSK047)

Local features and places are given names, which have meaning to people, and these places can be defined on a variety of scales, including personal (e.g. home), local (e.g. street, suburb or town), regional (e.g. state) and national (e.g. country) (ACHASSK048)

The ways in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples maintain connections to their Country/Place (ACHASSK049)

The connections of people in Australia to other places in Australia, in the Asia region, and across the world (e.g. family connections, trade, travel, special events, natural disasters) (ACHASSK050)

The influence of purpose (e.g. shopping, recreation), distance (e.g. location) and accessibility (e.g. technology, transport) on the frequency with which people visit places (ACHASSK050)

History

The past in the present

The history of a significant person, building, site or part of the natural environment in the local community and what it reveals about the past (ACHASSK044)

The importance today of an historical site (e.g. community building, landmark, war memorial, rock painting, engraving) and why it has heritage significance and cultural value for present generations (e.g. a record of a significant historical event, aesthetic value, reflects the community's identity) (ACHASSK045)

The impact of changing technology on people's lives (e.g. at home, work, travel, communication, leisure, toys) and how the technology of the past differs from what is used today (ACHASSK046)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Reflect on current understanding of a topic (e.g. think-pair-share, brainstorm)

Pose questions about the familiar and unfamiliar

Locate information from a variety of provided sources (e.g. books, television, people, images, plans, internet)

Sort and record selected information and/or data (e.g. use graphic organisers, take keywords)

Analysing

Identify relevant information

Process information and/or data collected (e.g. sequence information or events, categorise information, combine information from different sources)

Explore points of view (e.g. understand that stories can be told from different perspectives)

Represent collected information and/or data in to different formats (e.g. tables, maps, plans)

Evaluating

Draw conclusions based on information and/or data displayed in pictures, texts and maps (e.g. form categories, make generalisations based on patterns)

Participate in decision-making processes (e.g. engage in group discussions, make shared decisions, share views)

Communicating and reflecting

Present findings in a range of communication forms, using relevant terms (e.g. written, oral, digital, role-play, graphic)

Develop texts, including narratives, that describe an event or place

Reflect on learning and respond to findings (e.g. discussing what they have learned)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students pose questions, locate, sort and record collected information and/or data from provided sources. They identify and process relevant information and/or data by categorising, sequencing events and exploring points of view. Students use different formats to represent their information, and draw simple conclusions. They participate in decision-making processes by contributing to group discussions. Students share their findings in a range of ways, and develop simple texts using some relevant terms. They reflect on what they have learnt using oral and/or written forms.

Students locate major geographical divisions of the world, and describe places at a variety of scales. They describe the interconnections between people and places, and they identify the factors that influence people’s connections with others in different places. Students identify people, sites and parts of the natural environment in their local community that reveal information about the past, and those that have significance today. They identify examples of how technology has changed and its impact on people’s lives.



Year 3 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 3, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Civics and Citizenship, Geography and History.

Students develop their understanding and application of skills, including questioning and researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to their daily learning experiences and to investigate events, developments, issues and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Students build on their understanding of civics and citizenship through the concepts of democracy and participation. Using familiar contexts, they consider how and why community groups create rules and make decisions. Students think about their own participation in the local community and how this contributes to society.

The concepts of place, space, environment and interconnection continue to be developed as a way of thinking. Students examine the similarities and differences between places, with the opportunity to inquire into the natural and human characteristics of places in various locations at the local, regional and national scale. The development of the students' mental map of the world is extended through a study of the location and characteristics of places in the southern hemisphere, including Australia and its near neighbours.

Students are given the opportunity to develop their historical understanding through the key concepts of sources, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance. These concepts are investigated within the context of exploring the historical features and diversity of their community as represented in symbols and emblems of significance, and celebrations and commemorations, both locally and in other places around the world.

Economics and Business does not commence until Year 5. The Year 3 Mathematics curriculum provides opportunities for students to engage in economics and business concepts, such as simple transactions and financial literacy.

Knowledge and understanding

Civics and Citizenship

Communities

Communities make decisions in different ways and voting is a way that groups make decisions democratically (ACHASSK070)

Who makes rules, why rules are important and the consequences of rules not being followed (ACHASSK071)

Why people participate in community groups, such as a school or community project, and how students can actively participate and contribute to their local community (ACHASSK072)

Geography

Places are both similar and different

The location of Australian states, territories, capital cities and major regional centres of Western Australia and the location and identifying attributes of Australia's major natural features (e.g. rivers, deserts, rainforests, the Great Dividing Range, the Great Barrier Reef) (ACHASSK066)

Language groups of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples divides their Country/Place and differs from the surveyed boundaries of Australian states and territories (ACHASSK066)

The location of Australia's neighbouring countries and their diverse natural characteristics and human characteristics (ACHASSK067)

The difference between climate and weather, the main climatic zones of the world (e.g. equatorial, tropical, arid, temperate) and the similarities and differences between the climates of different places (ACHASSK068)

The similarities and differences between places in terms of their type of settlement, the diversity of people (e.g. age, birthplace, language, family composition), the lives of the people who live there, and feelings and perceptions about places (ACHASSK069)

History

Communities and remembrance

One important example of change and one important example of continuity over time in the local community, region or state/territory (e.g. in relation to the areas of transport, work, education, natural and built environments, entertainment, daily life) (ACHASSK062)

The role that different cultural groups have played in the development and character of the local community (e.g. as reflected in architecture, commercial outlets, religious buildings), compared with development in another community (ACHASSK063)

The historical origins and significance of the days and weeks celebrated or commemorated in Australia (e.g. Australia Day, ANZAC Day, National Sorry Day) and the importance of symbols and emblems (ACHASSK064)

The historical origins and significance of celebrations and commemorations in other places around the world (e.g. Bastille Day in France, Independence Day in the USA; and those observed in Australia, such as Chinese New Year, Christmas Day, Diwali, Easter, Hanukkah, the Moon Festival, Ramadan) (ACHASSK065)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Identify current understanding of a topic (e.g. brainstorm, KWL chart)

Develop a range of focus questions to investigate

Locate and collect information from a variety of sources (e.g. photographs, maps, books, interviews, internet)

Record selected information and/or data (e.g. use graphic organisers, develop note-taking strategies)

Recognise the ethical protocols that exist when gathering information and/or data (e.g. respecting others' work)

Analysing

Develop criteria for selecting relevant information (e.g. accuracy, reliability, usefulness)

Interpret information and/or data collected (e.g. sequence events in chronological order, identify patterns and trends, make connections between old and new information)

Identify different points of view/perspectives in information and/or data (e.g. distinguish fact from opinion, explore different stories on the same topic)

Translate collected information and/or data into different formats (e.g. create a timeline, change data in to a table and/or graph)

Evaluating

Draw conclusions and give explanations, based on the information and/or data displayed in texts, tables, graphs and maps (e.g. show similarities and differences)

Use decision-making processes (e.g. share views, recognise different points of view, identify issues, identify possible solutions, plan for action in groups)

Communicating and reflecting

Present findings and conclusions in a range of communication forms (e.g. written, oral, visual, digital, tabular, graphic), appropriate to audience and purpose, using relevant terms

Develop texts, including narratives and biographies, that use researched facts, events and experiences

Reflect on learning, identify new understandings and act on findings in different ways (e.g. complete a KWL chart, propose action in response to new knowledge)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students develop questions, locate and collect information and/or data from a variety of sources. They record their information and/or data in a range of formats and use some protocols when referring to the work of others. Students use given criteria to select relevant information, and they interpret information and/or data by sequencing events and identifying different points of view. They translate information and/or data into different formats. Students use given decision-making processes to draw simple conclusions and provide explanations, based on information and/or data. They present findings using a range of communication forms appropriate to audience and purpose, using relevant terms. Students develop texts, supported by researched information, and reflect on findings to propose an action.

Students identify the importance of rules and the democratic processes that groups follow when making decisions. They describe how people participate in community groups, and identify the benefits to both the individual and the community.

Students map and locate various boundaries and natural features that define Australia. They describe the diverse characteristics of Australia’s neighbouring countries, and identify different climatic zones of the world. Students identify simple interconnections between people and places, and describe how people’s perceptions of places are influenced.

Students describe an example of continuity and change over time in a given area. They identify the contribution of different cultural groups on a community. Students identify the ways people in Australia, and around the world, acknowledge days and events that have historical significance.



Year 4 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 4, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Civics and Citizenship, Geography and History.

Students develop their understanding and application of skills, including questioning and researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to their daily learning experiences and to investigate events, developments, issues and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Students continue to build on their understanding of civics and citizenship through the concepts of democratic values, rights and responsibilities, and participation. They explore the purpose and services of local government and how this contributes to community life. The notions of belonging and personal identity are further developed to encompass laws, the importance of laws in society and cultural diversity.

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection and sustainability continue to be developed as a way of thinking. Students have the opportunity to inquire into how the environment supports the lives of people and all other living things; and that people have differing views on how sustainability can be achieved. The development of the students' mental map of the world is extended through a study of the location and characteristics of Africa and Europe.

Students are given the opportunity to develop their historical understanding through the key concepts of sources, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance. These concepts are investigated within the context of exploring the history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples before the arrival of the Europeans, and European exploration and colonisation up to the early 1800s. They explore interactions between groups and determine how these experiences contributed to cultural diversity.

Economics and Business does not commence until Year 5. The Year 4 Mathematics curriculum provides opportunities for students to engage in economics and business concepts, such as purchasing and financial literacy.

Knowledge and understanding

Civics and Citizenship

Government and society

The purpose of government and some familiar services provided by local government (e.g. libraries, health, arts, parks, environment and waste, pools and sporting facilities, pet management) (ACHASSK091)

The differences between 'rules' and 'laws' (ACHASSK092)

The importance and purpose of laws (e.g. to maintain social cohesion, to reflect society's values) (ACHASSK092)

People belong to diverse groups, such as cultural, religious and/or social groups, and this can shape identity (ACHASSK093)

Geography

The Earth's environment sustains all life

The main characteristics (e.g. climate, natural vegetation, landforms, native animals) of the continents of Africa and Europe, and the location of their major countries in relation to Australia (ACHASSK087)

The importance of environments to animals and people, and different views on how they can be protected (ACHASSK088)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples' ways of living were adapted to available resources and their connection to Country/Place has influenced their views on the sustainable use of these resources, before and after colonisation (ACHASSK089)

The natural resources (e.g. water, timber, minerals) provided by the environment and different views on how they can be used sustainably (ACHASSK090)

History

First contacts

The diversity and longevity of Australia's first peoples and the ways they are connected to Country/Place (e.g. land, sea, waterways, skies) and their pre-contact ways of life (ACHASSK083)

The journey(s) of at least one world navigator, explorer or trader up to the late 18th century (e.g. Christopher Columbus, Vasco da Gama, Ferdinand Magellan), including their contacts and exchanges with societies in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Oceania, and the impact on one society (ACHASSK084)

Stories of the First Fleet, including reasons for the journey, who travelled to Australia, and their experiences following arrival (e.g. treatment of convicts, daily lives, social order) (ACHASSK085)

The nature of contact between Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples and others (e.g. the Macassans, Europeans) and the impact that these interactions and colonisation had on the environment and people's lives (e.g. dispossession, dislocation, the loss of lives through conflict, disease, loss of food sources and medicines) (ACHASSK086)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Identify current understanding of a topic (e.g. brainstorm, KWL chart)

Develop a range of focus questions to investigate

Locate and collect information from a variety of sources (e.g. photographs, maps, books, interviews, internet)

Record selected information and/or data (e.g. use graphic organisers, develop note-taking strategies)

Recognise the ethical protocols that exist when gathering information and/or data (e.g. respecting others' work)

Analysing

Develop criteria for selecting relevant information (e.g. accuracy, reliability, usefulness)

Interpret information and/or data collected (e.g. sequence events in chronological order, identify patterns and trends, make connections between old and new information)

Identify different points of view/perspectives in information and/or data (e.g. distinguish fact from opinion, explore different stories on the same topic)

Translate collected information and/or data into different formats (e.g. create a timeline, change data into a table and/or graph)

Evaluating

Draw conclusions and give explanations, based on the information and/or data displayed in texts, tables, graphs and maps (e.g. show similarities and differences)

Use decision-making processes (e.g. share views, recognise different points of view, identify issues, identify possible solutions, plan for action in groups)

Communicating and reflecting

Present findings and conclusions in a range of communication forms (e.g. written, oral, visual, digital, tabular, graphic), appropriate to audience and purpose, using relevant terms

Develop texts, including narratives and biographies, that use researched facts, events and experiences

Reflect on learning, identify new understandings and act on findings in different ways (e.g. complete a KWL chart, propose action in response to new knowledge)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students develop questions, locate and collect information and/or data from a variety of sources. They record their information and/or data in a range of formats and use some protocols when referring to the work of others. Students use given criteria to select relevant information, and they interpret information and/or data by sequencing events and identifying different points of view. They translate information and/or data into different formats. Students use given decision-making processes to draw simple conclusions and provide explanations based on information and/or data. They present findings using a range of communication forms appropriate to audience and purpose, using relevant terms. Students develop texts supported by researched information, and reflect on findings to propose an action.

Students identify the role of local government in the community, and recognise that people’s identity can be shaped through participation in a community group. They distinguish between rules and laws and identify that rights and responsibilities are important in maintaining social cohesion.

Students identify the location of Africa and Europe, and their major countries, in relation to Australia. They identify the main characteristics of their natural environments and describe the importance of the interconnections between people, plants and animals at the local to global scale. Students recognise that people have different views on the sustainable use of natural resources and describe how they can be managed and protected.

Students describe the connection that Australia’s First Peoples have to Country/Place and identify the impact of contact on Indigenous peoples in Australia, and around the world, as a result of exploration and colonisation. They identify the significance of past events in bringing about change and describe the experiences of an individual or a group over time. Students explain how and why life changed in the past and identify aspects of the past that have remained the same.



Year 5 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 5, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography and History.

Students develop their understanding and application of skills, including questioning and researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to their daily learning experiences and to investigate events, developments, issues and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Students continue to build on their understanding of the concepts of democratic values, justice and rights and responsibilities as they further develop their understanding of laws, including how they are enforced and how they affect the lives of citizens. Students are introduced to the concept of the Westminster system as they explore the key features of Australia's electoral process.

The importance of informed consumer decision-making is introduced through the concept of making choices. Students focus on the factors that impact upon the allocation of resources and this is underpinned by the concept of scarcity. They relate this to a personal or community context, questioning what influences their own decision-making.

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking. Students have the opportunity to inquire into the connections between people and the environment, and how these interactions influence one another. The development of the students' mental map of the world is extended through a study of the location and characteristics of North America and South America.

Students are given the opportunity to develop their historical understanding through the key concepts of sources, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance. These concepts are investigated within the historical context of colonial Australia in the 1800s and the significant events and people who shaped the political and social structures at that time are considered.

Knowledge and understanding

Civics and Citizenship

Roles, responsibilities and participation

The key values that underpin Australia's democracy, including freedom, equality, fairness and justice (ACHASSK115)

The roles and responsibilities of electors (e.g. enrolling to vote, being informed) and representatives (e.g. representing their electorate's interests, participating in the parliamentary process) in Australia's democracy (ACHASSK116)

The key features of the electoral process in Australia, such as compulsory voting, secret ballot, preferential voting (ACHASSK116)

How regulations and laws affect the lives of citizens (e.g. the different types of laws, how laws protect human rights) (ACHASSK117)

The roles and responsibilities of key personnel in law enforcement (e.g. customs officials, police) and in the legal system (e.g. lawyers, judges) (ACHASSK117)

Why people work in groups to achieve their aims and functions, and exercise influence, such as volunteers who work in community groups (e.g. rural fire services, emergency services, youth groups) (ACHASSK118)

Economics and Business

Wants, resources and choices

The difference between needs and wants, and how they may differ between individuals (ACHASSK119)

Resources can be natural (e.g. oil), human (e.g. workers), or capital (e.g. machinery), and how these are used to make goods and services to satisfy the needs and wants of present and future generations (ACHASSK120)

Due to scarcity, choices need to be made about how limited resources are used (e.g. using the land to grow crops or to graze cattle) (ACHASSK119)

The factors that influence purchase decisions (e.g. age, gender, advertising, price) and how these decisions affect resource use (ACHASSK121)

Strategies for making informed consumer and financial decisions (e.g. budgeting, comparing prices, saving for the future) (ACHASSK121)

Geography

Factors that shape the environmental characteristics of places

The main characteristics (e.g. climate, natural vegetation, landforms, native animals) of the continents of South America and North America, and the location of their major countries in relation to Australia (ACHASSK111)

The way people alter the environmental characteristics of Australian places (e.g. vegetation clearance, fencing, urban development, drainage, irrigation, farming, forest plantations, mining) (ACHASSK112)

Features of environments (e.g. climate, landforms, vegetation) influence human activities and the built features of places (ACHASSK113)

The impact of bushfires or floods on environments and communities, and how people can respond (ACHASSK114)

History

The Australian colonies

The economic, political and social reasons for establishing British colonies in Australia after 1800 (e.g. the establishment of penal colonies) (ACHASSK106)

The patterns of colonial development and settlement (e.g. geographical features, climate, water resources, transport, discovery of gold) and how this impacted upon the environment (e.g. introduced species) and the daily lives of the different inhabitants (e.g. convicts, free settlers, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples) (ACHASSK107)

The economic, social and political impact of one significant development or event on a colony and the potential outcomes created by 'what if…?' scenarios (e.g. frontier conflict; the gold rushes; the Eureka Stockade; the Pinjarra Massacre; the advent of rail; the expansion of farming; drought) (ACHASSK107)

The contribution or significance of one individual or group in shaping the Swan River Colony, including their motivations and actions (e.g. groups such as explorers, farmers, pastoralists, convicts or individuals such as James Stirling, John Septimus Roe, Thomas Peel) (ACHASSK110)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Identify current understandings, consider possible misconceptions and identify personal views on a topic (e.g. KWL chart, concept map)

Develop and refine a range of questions required to plan an inquiry

Locate and collect information and/or data from a range of appropriate primary sources and secondary sources (e.g. museums, media, library catalogues, interviews, internet)

Record selected information and/or data using a variety of methods (e.g. use graphic organisers, paraphrase, summarise)

Use ethical protocols when gathering information and/or data (e.g. acknowledge the work of others, reference work appropriately, obtain permission to use photographs and interviews)

Analysing

Use criteria to determine the relevancy of information (e.g. consider accuracy, reliability, publication date, usefulness to the question)

Interpret information and/or data collected (e.g. sequence events in chronological order, identify cause and effect, make connections with prior knowledge)

Identify different points of view/perspectives in information and/or data (e.g. analyse language, identify motives)

Translate collected information and/or data to a variety of different formats (e.g. create a timeline, draw maps, convert a table of statistics into a graph)

Evaluating

Draw and justify conclusions, and give explanations, based on the information and/or data in texts, tables, graphs and maps (e.g. identify patterns, infer relationships)

Use decision-making processes (e.g. share opinions and personal perspectives, consider different points of view, identify issues, develop possible solutions, plan for action, identify advantages and disadvantages of different options)

Communicating and reflecting

Present findings, conclusions and/or arguments, appropriate to audience and purpose, in a range of communication forms (e.g. written, oral, visual, digital, tabular, graphic, maps) and using subject-specific terminology and concepts

Develop a variety of texts, including narratives, descriptions, biographies and persuasive texts, based on information collected from source materials

Reflect on learning, identify new understandings and act on findings in different ways (e.g. suggest additional questions to be investigated, propose a course of action on an issue that is significant to them)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students develop questions for a specific purpose. They locate and collect relevant information and/or data from primary and/or secondary sources, using appropriate methods to organise and record information. Students apply ethical protocols when collecting information. They use criteria to determine the relevance of information and/or data. Students interpret information and/or data, sequence information about events, identify different perspectives, and describe cause and effect. They use a variety of appropriate formats to translate collected information and draw conclusions from evidence in information and/or data. Students engage in a range of processes when making decisions in drawing conclusions. They consider audience and purpose when selecting appropriate communication forms. Students develop a variety of texts that incorporate source materials, using some subject-specific terminology and concepts. They reflect on findings to refine their learning.

Students identify the key features of Australia’s democracy, describe the electoral process, and explain the significance of laws and how they are enforced. They describe how participation in groups can benefit the community.

Students identify the imbalance between wants and resources, and the impact of scarcity on resource allocation. They identify that, when making choices, people use strategies to inform their purchasing and financial decisions.

Students identify the location of North America and South America and their major countries, in relation to Australia. They describe the characteristics of places, and the interconnections between places, people and environments. Students identify the impact of these interconnections and how people manage and respond to a geographical challenge.

Students identify the cause and effect of change on Australia’s colonies, and describe aspects of the past that have remained the same. They describe the different experiences of people in the past. Students recognise the significance of a group, individual, event or development in bringing about change in the Swan River Colony.



Year 6 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 6, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography and History.

Students develop their understanding and application of skills, including questioning and researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to their daily learning experiences and to investigate events, developments, issues and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Students continue building on their understanding of the concepts of justice, rights and responsibilities, and the Westminster system. They investigate Australia's democratic system of government, including state/territory and federal parliaments, and the court system. Students examine Australian citizenship, and reflect on the rights and responsibilities that being a citizen entails.

Students further develop their understanding of economics and business concepts, such as scarcity and making choices, as they explore the ways resources are allocated to meet needs and wants in their community. They consider the effect of consumer and financial decisions on individuals, the community and the environment. Students focus on community or regional issues, with opportunities for concepts to also be considered in national or global contexts where appropriate.

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking. Students inquire into the factors that shape the diverse characteristics of different places and how people, places and environments are interconnected, including a study of the world's cultural, economic, demographic and social diversity. The development of the students' mental map of the world is extended through a study of the location of countries in the Asia region.

Students are given the opportunity to develop their historical understanding through the key concepts of sources, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance. These concepts are investigated within the historical context of the development of Australia as a nation, particularly after 1900; the factors that led to Federation; and how Australian society changed throughout the 20th century.

Knowledge and understanding

Civics and citizenship

Australia's system of government and citizenship

The key institutions of Australia's democratic system of government based on the Westminster system, including the monarchy, parliaments and courts (ACHASSK143)

The roles and responsibilities of the three levels of government, including the shared roles and responsibilities within Australia's federal system (ACHASSK144)

How laws are initiated and passed through the federal parliament (ACHASSK146)

Who can be an Australian citizen, the formal rights and responsibilities, and shared values of Australian citizenship (ACHASSK147)

Economics and business

Trade-offs and impacts of consumer and financial decisions

Choices about the use of resources result from the imbalance of limited resources and unlimited wants (i.e. the concept of scarcity) (ACHASSK149)

Decisions about the alternative use of resources result in the need to consider trade-offs (e.g. using the land to grow crops or to graze cattle) (ACHASSK149)

The impact consumer purchasing decisions can have on a family, the broader community (e.g. purchasing from the local growers' market or a supermarket chain) and the environment (e.g. pollution, waste) (ACHASSK150)

Businesses provide goods and services in different ways (e.g. shopping centres, local markets, online stores, small independent stores, remote community stores) to earn revenue (ACHASSK151)

Geography

A diverse and connected world

The location of the major countries of the Asia region in relation to Australia and the geographical diversity within the region (ACHASSK138)

Differences in the economic characteristics (e.g. per capita income, energy consumption), demographic characteristics (e.g. population size, density) and social characteristics (e.g. life expectancy, education) of a selection of countries across the world (ACHASSK139)

The world's cultural diversity, including that of its indigenous peoples who live in different regions in the world, such as the Maori of Aotearoa (New Zealand), and the Orang Asli of Malaysia and Indonesia (ACHASSK140)

Australia's connections with countries (e.g. trade, migration, tourism, aid, education, defence, sport) and how these connections change people and places (ACHASSK141)

History

Australia as a nation

Key figures (e.g. Henry Parkes, Edmund Barton, George Reid, John Quick), ideas and events (e.g. the Tenterfield Oration, the Corowa Conference, the referendums) that led to Australia's Federation and Constitution, including British and American influences on Australia's system of law and government (e.g. Magna Carta, federalism, constitutional monarchy, the Westminster system, the Houses of Parliament) (ACHASSK134)

Experiences of Australia's democracy and citizenship, including the status and rights of Aboriginal people and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples, migrants, women and children (ACHASSK135)

Stories of groups of people who migrated to Australia (including from one Asian country), the reasons they migrated (e.g. push–pull factors) and their contributions to society (ACHASSK136)(ACHASSK137)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Identify current understandings, consider possible misconceptions and identify personal views on a topic (e.g. KWL chart, concept map)

Develop and refine a range of questions required to plan an inquiry

Locate and collect information and/or data from a range of appropriate primary sources and secondary sources (e.g. museums, media, library catalogues, interviews, internet)

Record selected information and/or data using a variety of methods (e.g. use graphic organisers, paraphrase, summarise)

Use ethical protocols when gathering information and/or data (e.g. acknowledge the work of others, reference work appropriately, obtain permission to use photographs and interviews)

Analysing

Use criteria to determine the relevancy of information (e.g. consider accuracy, reliability, publication date, usefulness to the question)

Interpret information and/or data collected (e.g. sequence events in chronological order, identify cause and effect, make connections with prior knowledge)

Identify different points of view/perspectives in information and/or data (e.g. analyse language, identify motives)

Translate collected information and/or data to a variety of different formats (e.g. create a timeline, draw maps, convert a table of statistics into a graph)

Evaluating

Draw and justify conclusions, and give explanations, based on the information and/or data in texts, tables, graphs and maps (e.g. identify patterns, infer relationships)

Use decision-making processes (e.g. share opinions and personal perspectives, consider different points of view, identify issues, develop possible solutions, plan for action, identify advantages and disadvantages of different options)

Communicating and reflecting

Present findings, conclusions and/or arguments, appropriate to audience and purpose, in a range of communication forms (e.g. written, oral, visual, digital, tabular, graphic, maps) and using subject-specific terminology and concepts

Develop a variety of texts, including narratives, descriptions, biographies and persuasive texts, based on information collected from source materials

Reflect on learning, identify new understandings and act on findings in different ways (e.g. suggest additional questions to be investigated, propose a course of action on an issue that is significant to them)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students develop questions for a specific purpose. They locate and collect relevant information and/or data from primary and/or secondary sources, using appropriate methods to organise and record information. Students apply ethical protocols when collecting information. They use criteria to determine the relevance of information and/or data. Students interpret information and/or data, sequence information about events, identify different perspectives, and describe cause and effect. They use a variety of appropriate formats to translate collected information and draw conclusions from evidence in information and/or data. Students engage in a range of processes when making decisions in drawing conclusions. They consider audience and purpose when selecting appropriate communication forms. Students develop a variety of texts that incorporate source materials, using some subject-specific terminology and concepts. They reflect on findings to refine their learning.

Students recognise that Australia’s democracy is based on the Westminster system, and describe the roles and responsibilities of each level of government and how laws are made. They identify the democratic values associated with Australian citizenship and describe the rights and responsibilities of being an Australian citizen.

Students identify the imbalance between needs and wants, and describe how the allocation of resources involves trade-offs. They identify the advantages and disadvantages of specialisation in terms of the different ways businesses organise the provision of goods and services. Students identify the factors that influence consumer decisions when making choices, and the consequences of those choices for businesses and the consumer.

Students identify the location of Asia and its major countries, in relation to Australia. They recognise the geographical and cultural diversity of places, by describing the physical and human characteristics of specific places, at the local to global scale. Students identify that people, places and environments are interconnected and describe how these interconnections lead to change.

Students explain the significance of an individual, group or event on the Federation of Australia, and identify ideas and/or influences of other systems on the development of Australia as a nation. They describe continuity and change in relation to Australia’s democracy and citizenship. Students compare experiences of migration and describe the cause and effect of change on society.



Year 7 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 7, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography and History.

Students develop increasing independence in critical thinking and skill application, which includes questioning, researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to investigate events, developments, issues, and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Students continue to build on their understanding of the concepts of the Westminster system and democracy by examining the key features of Australia's democracy, and how it is shaped through the Australian Constitution and constitutional change. The concepts of justice, rights and responsibilities are further developed through a focus on Australia's legal system.

An understanding of the concepts making choices and allocation is further developed through a focus on the interdependence of consumers and producers in the market, the characteristics of successful businesses, including how specialisation and entrepreneurial behaviour contributes to business success. Work and work futures are introduced, as students consider why people work. Students focus on national issues, with opportunities for the concepts to also be considered in relation to local community or global issues where appropriate.

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking and provide students with the opportunity to inquire into the nature of water as a natural resource. The concept of place is expanded through students' investigation of the liveability of their own place. They apply this understanding to a wide range of places and environments at the full range of scales, from local to global, and in a range of locations.

Students develop their historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts are investigated within the historical context of how we know about the ancient past, and why and where the earliest societies developed.

Knowledge and understanding

Civics and citizenship

Designing our political and legal system

The purpose and value of the Australian Constitution (ACHCK048)

The concept of the separation of powers between the legislature, executive and judiciary and how it seeks to prevent the excessive concentration of power (ACHCK048)

The division of powers between state/territory and federal levels of government in Australia (ACHCK048)

The different roles of the House of Representatives and the Senate in Australia's bicameral parliament (ACHCK048)

The process for constitutional change through a referendum and examples of attempts to change the Australian Constitution by referendum, such as the successful vote on the Constitution Alteration (Aboriginals) 1967 or the unsuccessful vote on the Constitution Alteration (Establishment of Republic) 1999 (ACHCK049)

How Australia's legal system aims to provide justice, including through the rule of law, presumption of innocence, burden of proof, right to a fair trial, and right to legal representation (ACHCK050)

How citizens participate in providing justice through their roles as witnesses and jurors (ACHCK050)

Economics and business

Producing and consuming

How consumers rely on businesses to meet their needs and wants (ACHEK017)

How businesses respond to the demands of consumers (e.g. responding to preference for healthy options, environmentally friendly products and packaging, organic food) (ACHEK017)

Why businesses might set a certain price for a product and how they might adjust the price according to demand (ACHEK017)

Characteristics of entrepreneurs, including the behaviours and skills they bring to their businesses (e.g. establishing a shared vision; and demonstrating initiative, innovation and enterprise (ACHEK019)

Why individuals work (e.g. earning an income, contributing to an individual's self-esteem, material and non-material living standards, happiness) (ACHEK020)

Different types of work (e.g. full-time, part-time, casual, at home, paid, unpaid, volunteer) (ACHEK020)

How people derive an income and alternative sources of income (e.g. owning a business, being a shareholder, owning a rental service) (ACHEK020)

The ways people who have retired from employment earn an income (e.g. age pension, superannuation, private savings) (ACHEK020)

Geography

Water in the world

The classification of environmental resources (renewable and non-renewable) (ACHGK037)

The quantity and variability of Australia's water resources compared with those in other continents (ACHGK039)

Water scarcity and what causes it, why it is a problem and ways of overcoming water scarcity (e.g. recycling, stormwater harvesting and reuse, desalination, inter-regional transfer of water, reducing water consumption) including studies drawn from Australia, and one from West Asia or North Africa (ACHGK040)

Place and liveability

The factors that influence the decisions people make about where to live and their perceptions of the liveability of places (ACHGK043)

The influence of accessibility to services and facilities on the liveability of places (ACHGK044)

The influence of environmental quality on the liveability of places (ACHGK045)

The strategies used to enhance the liveability of places, especially for young people, including examples from Australia and Europe (ACHGK047)

History

The ancient world (Egypt, Greece, Rome, India, China)

Overview: 

  • The location of the ancient civilisations 
  • The timeframe of the ancient civilisations

Depth study 1: Investigating the ancient past

How historians and archaeologists investigate history, including excavation and archival research (ACDSEH001)

The range of sources that can be used in an historical investigation, including archaeological and written sources (ACDSEH029)

The importance of conserving the remains of the ancient past, including the heritage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACDSEH148)

Depth study 2: Investigating one ancient society (Egypt, Greece, Rome, India, China)

The physical features and how they influenced the civilisation that developed there (ACDSEH002; ACDSEH003ACDSEH004ACDSEH005ACDSEH006)

Roles of key groups in the ancient society, and the influence of law and religion (ACDSEH032ACDSEH035ACDSEH038ACDSEH041; ACDSEH042)

The significant beliefs, values and practices of the ancient society, with a particular emphasis on one of the following areas: everyday life, warfare, or death and funerary customs (ACDSEH033ACDSEH036ACDSEH039ACDSEH042ACDSEH045)

The role of a significant individual in the ancient society's history (ACDSEH129ACDSEH130ACDSEH131ACDSEH132ACDSEH133)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Identify current understandings to consider possible gaps and/or misconceptions, new knowledge needed and challenges to personal perspectives

Construct a range of questions, propositions and/or hypotheses

Use a variety of methods to collect relevant information and/or data from a range of appropriate sources, such as print, digital, audio, visual and fieldwork

Select the best method for recording selected information and/or data (e.g. graphic organisers, such as structured overviews for classifying; mind maps, for identifying relationships and overviews; fieldwork, which may require sketch drawings, a list of observable features and photographs)

Identify differences in terms of origin and purpose between primary sources (e.g. a cartoon, speech, artefact) and secondary sources (e.g. reference books, such as a dictionary or encyclopedia)

Use appropriate ethical protocols to plan and conduct an inquiry (e.g. seek permission to use personal photos, seek permission when planning a visit to Aboriginal cultural land, use specific formats for acknowledging other people's information)

Analysing

Use criteria to select relevant information and/or data such as accuracy, reliability, currency and usefulness to the question

Interpret information and/or data to identify key relationships and/or trends displayed in various formats (e.g. change over time in a series of images, identify spatial distributions from a map)

Identify points of view/perspectives, attitudes and/or values in information and/or data (e.g. from tables, statistics, graphs, models, cartoons, maps, timelines)

Translate information and/or data from one format to another (e.g. from a table to a graph)

Apply subject-specific skills and concepts in familiar and new situations

Evaluating

Draw evidence-based conclusions by evaluating information and/or data to generate a range of alternatives and plan for action in response to contemporary events, challenges, developments, issues, problems and/or phenomena; make comparisons; evaluate costs (disadvantages) and benefits (advantages); and infer relationships

Communicating and reflecting

Represent information and/or data using appropriate formats to suit audience and purpose (e.g. tables/graphs, visual displays, models, timelines, maps, other graphic organisers)

Develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, using appropriate subject-specific terminology and concepts that use evidence to support findings, conclusions and/or arguments, from a range of sources

Reflect on learning to review original understandings and/or determine actions in response to events, challenges, developments, issues, problems and/or phenomena

Achievement standard

At Standard, students construct a range of questions and use a variety of methods to select, collect and organise information and/or data from appropriate sources. They develop criteria to determine the usefulness of primary and/or secondary sources for a purpose. When interpreting sources, students identify their origin and purpose, and distinguish between fact and opinion. They interpret information and/or data to identify points of view/perspectives, relationships and/or trends, and to sequence events and developments. Students apply subject-specific skills to translate information and/or data from one format to another, in both familiar and unfamiliar situations. They draw simple evidence-based conclusions in a range of contexts. Students represent information and/or data in appropriate formats to suit audience and purpose. They develop texts using appropriate subject-specific terminology and concepts. Students use evidence to support findings and acknowledge sources of information.

Students describe how democracy in Australia is shaped by the Commonwealth Constitution. They describe the operation of Australia’s federal structure of government and the role of parliament, within the Westminster system. Students identify rights and responsibilities of being a participant in the legal system and describe how the legal system aims to provide justice.

Students describe how the price of goods and services results from interactions between consumers and businesses, as a consequence of making choices. They describe how the specialisation of workers and businesses, including entrepreneurial behaviour, provides benefits to individuals and the wider community.

Students describe the changes caused by interconnections between people, places and natural environments, and the alternative strategies used to manage the changes. They describe the features of liveable places, and how and/or why places are perceived and valued differently.

Students describe the role of groups and the significance of particular individuals in ancient society, and suggest reasons for change and continuity over time. They identify past events and developments that have been interpreted in different ways. Students describe events and developments from the perspective of different people who lived at the time.



Year 8 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 8, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography and History.

Students develop increasing independence in critical thinking and skill application, which includes questioning, researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to investigate events, developments, issues and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Students continue to build on their understanding of the concepts of the Westminster system, democracy and participation. They investigate the types of law in Australia and how they are made. They consider the responsibilities and freedoms of citizens, and how Australians can actively participate in their democracy. Students explore the different perspectives of Australian identity.

The concept of markets is introduced to further develop students understanding of the concepts of interdependence, making choices and allocation. They consider how markets work and the rights, responsibilities and opportunities that arise for businesses, consumers and governments. Work and work futures are explored as students consider the influences on the way people work now and consider how people will work in the future. Students focus on national and regional issues, with opportunities for the concepts to also be considered in relation to local community, or global, issues where appropriate.

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking and provide students with the opportunity to inquire into the significance of landscapes to people and the spatial change in the distribution of populations. They apply this understanding to a wide range of places and environments at the full range of scales, from local to global, and in a range of locations.

Students develop their historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts are investigated within the historical context of the end of the ancient period to the beginning of the modern period, c. 650 AD (CE) – 1750. They consider how societies changed, what key beliefs and values emerged, and the causes and effects of contact between societies in this period.

Knowledge and understanding

Civics and Citizenship

Democracy and law in action

The freedoms that enable active participation in Australia's democracy within the bounds of law, including freedom of speech, association, assembly, religion and movement (ACHCK061)

How citizens can participate in Australia's democracy, including use of the electoral system, contact with their elected representatives, use of lobby groups and direct action (ACHCK062)

How laws are made in Australia through parliaments (statutory law) (ACHCK063)

How laws are made in Australia through the courts (common law) (ACHCK063)

The types of law in Australia, including criminal law, civil law and the place of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander customary law (ACHCK064)

Different perspectives about Australia's national identity, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives and what it means to be Australian (ACHCK066)

Economics and Business

Participation and influences in the marketplace

The way markets operate in Australia and how the interaction between buyers and sellers influences prices and how markets enable the allocation of resources (how businesses answer the questions of what to produce, how to produce and for whom to produce) (ACHEK027)

How the government is involved in the market, such as providing some types of goods and services that are not being provided for sufficiently by the market (e.g. healthcare) (ACHEK027)

The rights and responsibilities of consumers and businesses in Australia (ACHEK029)

Types of businesses (e.g. sole trader, partnership, corporation, cooperative, franchise) and the ways that businesses respond to opportunities in Australia (ACHEK030)

Influences on the ways people work (e.g. technological change, outsourced labour in the global economy, rapid communication changes and factors that might affect work in the future) (ACHEK031)

Geography

Landforms and landscapes

The different types of landscapes in Australia and their distinctive landform features (e.g. coastal, riverine, arid, mountain, karst) (ACHGK048)

The spiritual, cultural and aesthetic value of landscapes and landforms for people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACHGK049)

The geographical processes that produce landforms, including a case study of one type of landform, such as mountains, volcanoes, riverine or coastal landforms (ACHGK050)

The causes, spatial distribution, impacts and responses to a geomorphic hazard (e.g. volcanic eruption, earthquake, tsunami, landslide, avalanche) (ACHGK053)

How the effects caused by geomorphic hazards are influenced by social, cultural and economic factors (e.g. where people choose to live, poverty, the available infrastructure and resources to prepare and respond to a hazard) (ACHGK053)

How the application of principles of prevention, mitigation and preparedness minimises the harmful effects of geomorphic hazards (ACHGK053)

Changing nations

The causes and consequences of urbanisation in Australia and one other country from the Asia region (ACHGK054)

The reasons for, and effects of, internal migration in Australia (ACHGK056)

The reasons for, and effects of, international migration in Australia (ACHGK058)

History

The ancient to the modern world

Overview

  • Key features of the medieval world (feudalism, trade routes, voyages of discovery, contact and conflict) (ACOKH009)

Depth study 1: Investigating medieval Europe (c. 590 – c. 1500)

The way of life in medieval Europe (e.g. social, cultural, economic and political features) and the roles and relationships of different groups in society (ACDSEH008)

Significant developments and/or cultural achievements, such as changing relations between Islam and the West (including the Crusades), architecture, medieval manuscripts and music (ACDSEH050)

Continuity and change in society in one of the following areas: crime and punishment; military and defence systems; towns, cities and commerce (ACDSEH051)

The role of significant individuals in the medieval period (e.g. Charlemagne) (ACDSEH052)

Depth study 2: Investigating the Black Death in Asia, Europe and Africa (14th century plague)

Living conditions and religious beliefs in the 14th century, including life expectancy, medical knowledge and beliefs about the power of God (ACDSEH015)

The role of expanding trade between Europe and Asia during the Black Death, including the origin and spread of the disease (ACDSEH069)

The causes and symptoms of the Black Death and the responses of different groups in society to the spread of the disease, such as the flagellants and monasteries (ACDSEH070)

The effects of the Black Death on Asian, European and African populations, and conflicting theories about the impact of the plague (ACDSEH071)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Identify current understandings to consider possible gaps and/or misconceptions, new knowledge needed and challenges to personal perspectives

Construct a range of questions, propositions and/or hypotheses

Use a variety of methods to collect relevant information and/or data from a range of appropriate sources, such as print, digital, audio, visual and fieldwork

Select the best method for recording selected information and/or data (e.g. graphic organisers, such as structured overviews for classifying; mind maps, for identifying relationships and overviews; fieldwork, which may require sketch drawings, a list of observable features and photographs)

Identify differences in terms of origin and purpose between primary sources (e.g. a cartoon, speech, artefact) and secondary sources (e.g. reference books, such as a dictionary or encyclopedia)

Use appropriate ethical protocols to plan and conduct an inquiry (e.g. seek permission to use personal photos, seek permission when planning a visit to Aboriginal cultural land, use specific formats for acknowledging other people's information)

Analysing

Use criteria to select relevant information and/or data such as accuracy, reliability, currency and usefulness to the question

Interpret information and/or data to identify key relationships and/or trends displayed in various formats (e.g. change over time in a series of images, identify spatial distributions from a map)

Identify points of view/perspectives, attitudes and/or values in information and/or data (e.g. from tables, statistics, graphs, models, cartoons, maps, timelines)

Translate information and/or data from one format to another (e.g. from a table to a graph)

Apply subject-specific skills and concepts in familiar and new situations

Evaluating

Draw evidence-based conclusions by evaluating information and/or data to generate a range of alternatives and plan for action in response to contemporary events, challenges, developments, issues, problems and/or phenomena; make comparisons; evaluate costs (disadvantages) and benefits (advantages); and infer relationships

Communicating and reflecting

Represent information and/or data using appropriate formats to suit audience and purpose (e.g. tables/graphs, visual displays, models, timelines, maps, other graphic organisers)

Develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, using appropriate subject-specific terminology and concepts that use evidence to support findings, conclusions and/or arguments, from a range of sources

Reflect on learning to review original understandings and/or determine actions in response to events, challenges, developments, issues, problems and/or phenomena

Achievement standard

At Standard, students construct a range of questions and use a variety of methods to select, collect and organise information and/or data from appropriate sources. They develop criteria to determine the usefulness of primary and/or secondary sources for a purpose. When interpreting sources, students identify their origin and purpose, and distinguish between fact and opinion. They interpret information and/or data to identify points of view/perspectives, relationships and/or trends, and to sequence events and developments. Students apply subject-specific skills to translate information and/or data from one format to another, in both familiar and unfamiliar situations. They draw simple evidence-based conclusions in a range of contexts. Students represent information and/or data in appropriate formats to suit audience and purpose. They develop texts using appropriate subject-specific terminology and concepts. Students use evidence to support findings and acknowledge sources of information.

Students explain the types of laws and how laws are made within the Westminster system and describe the rights and responsibilities of participants in the process. They apply aspects of democracy to case studies and explain the freedoms that underpin Australia’s democratic values.

Students explain how markets allocate resources in Australia and describe the interdependence of consumers, businesses and the government as a result of their involvement in the market. They identify how consumers and businesses influence and respond to each other in the market.

Students describe the geographical processes that produce landforms, and explain how places are perceived and valued differently. They consider the environmental and human characteristics of places to compare strategies for responding to a geographical challenge that takes into account environmental, economic and social factors. Students describe the interconnections within environments, and between people and places, to explain the movement of people at a local, national and global scale.

Students explain the feudal system in medieval Europe and the causes and effects of the Black Death, and describe patterns of change and continuity over time. They explain the significance of individuals and groups and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of medieval society.



Year 9 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 9, Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography and History.

Students develop increasing independence in critical thinking and skill application, which includes questioning, researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to investigate events, developments, issues and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Students continue to build on their understanding of the concepts of the Westminster system, democracy, democratic values, justice and participation. They examine the role of key players in the political system, the way citizens' decisions are shaped during an election campaign and how a government is formed. Students investigate how Australia's court system works in support of a democratic and just society.

Students are introduced to the concepts of specialisation and trade while continuing to further their understanding of the key concepts of scarcity, making choices, interdependence, and allocation and markets. They examine the connections between consumers, businesses and government, both within Australia and with other countries, through the flow of goods, services and resources in a global economy. The roles and responsibilities of the participants in the changing Australian and global workplace are explored.

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking, which provides students with an opportunity to inquire into the production of food and fibre, the role of the biotic environment and to explore how people, through their choices and actions, are connected to places in a variety of ways. Students apply this understanding to a wide range of places and environments at the full range of scales, from local to global, and in a range of locations.

Students develop their historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts are investigated within the historical context of the making of the modern world from 1750 to 1918. They consider how new ideas and technological developments contributed to change in this period, and the significance of World War I.

Knowledge and understanding

Civics and citizenship

Our democratic rights

The role of political parties, and independent representatives in Australia's system of government, including the formation of governments (ACHCK075)

How citizens' choices are shaped at election time (e.g. public debate, media, opinion polls, advertising, interest groups, political party campaigns) (ACHCK076)

How social media is used to influence people's understanding of issues (ACHCK076)

The key features of Australia's court system and the role of a particular court (e.g. a supreme court, a magistrates' court, the Family Court of Australia) and the types of cases different courts hear (ACHCK077)

How courts apply and interpret the law, resolve disputes, and make law through judgments (e.g. the role of precedents) (ACHCK077)

The key principles of Australia's justice system, including equality before the law, independent judiciary, and right of appeal (ACHCK078)

The factors that can undermine the application of the principles of justice (e.g. bribery, coercion of witnesses, trial by media, court delays) (ACHCK078)

Economics and business

Australia and the global economy

The role of the key participants in the Australian economy, such as consumers, producers, workers and the government (ACHEK038)

Australia's interdependence with other economies, such as trade and tourism, trade links with partners in the Asia region, and the goods and services traded (ACHEK038)

Why and how participants in the global economy are dependent on each other, including the activities of transnational corporations in the supply chains and the impact of global events on the Australian economy (ACHEK039)

Why and how people manage financial risks and rewards in the current Australian and global financial landscape, such as the use of differing investment types (ACHEK040)

The ways consumers can protect themselves from risks, such as debt, scams and identity theft (ACHEK040)

The nature of innovation and how businesses seek to create and maintain a competitive advantage in the market, including the global market (ACHEK041)

The way the work environment is changing in contemporary Australia and the implication for current and future work (ACHEK042)

Geography

Biomes and food security

The distribution and characteristics of biomes as regions with distinctive climates, soils, vegetation and productivity (ACHGK060)

The ways that humans in the production of food and fibre have altered some biomes (e.g. through vegetation clearance, drainage, terracing, irrigation) (ACHGK061)

The environmental, economic and technological factors that influence crop yields in Australia and across the world (e.g. climate, soils, landforms, water resources, irrigation, accessibility, labour supply, agricultural technologies) (ACHGK062)

The challenges to food production, including land and water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing land uses, and climate change for Australia and the world (ACHGK063)

The effects of anticipated future population growth on global food production and security; the capacity for Australia and the world to achieve food security; the implications for agriculture, agricultural innovation and environmental sustainability (ACHGK064)

Geographies of interconnections

The perceptions people have of place, and how this influences their connections to different places (ACHGK065)

The way transportation, and information and communication technologies are used to connect people to services, information and people in other places (ACHGK066)

The ways that places and people are interconnected with other places through trade in goods and services, at all scales (ACHGK067)

The effects of people's travel, recreational, cultural or leisure choices on places, and the implications for the future of these places (ACHGK069)

History

The making of the modern world 

Overview:

  • The important features of the modern period  (1750–1918) including technological change, Imperialism and Nationalism

Depth study 1: Investigating the Industrial Revolution (1750–1914)

The technological innovations that led to the Industrial Revolution, and other conditions that influenced the industrialisation of Britain (e.g. the agricultural revolution, access to raw materials, wealthy middle class, cheap labour, transport system, and expanding empire) and of Australia (ACDSEH017)

The population movements and changing settlement patterns during the Industrial Revolution (ACDSEH080)

The experiences of men, women and children during the Industrial Revolution, and their changing way of life (ACDSEH081)

The short-term and long-term impacts of the Industrial Revolution, including global changes in landscapes, transport and communication (ACDSEH082)

Depth study 2: Investigating World War I (1914–1918)

The causes of World War I and the reasons that men enlisted to fight in the war (ACDSEH021)

The places where Australians fought and the nature of warfare during World War I, including the Gallipoli campaign (ACDSEH095)

The impact of World War I, with a particular emphasis on Australia, such as the use of propaganda to influence the civilian population, the changing role of women and the conscription debate (ACDSEH096)

The commemoration of World War I, including debates about the nature and significance of the ANZAC legend (ACDSEH097)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Identify current personal knowledge, gaps, misconceptions, currency of information, personal perspective and possible perspectives of others

Construct, select and evaluate a range of questions and hypotheses involving cause and effect, patterns and trends, and different perspectives

Analyse and clarify the purpose of an inquiry using appropriate methodologies, ethical protocols and concepts to plan for, and inform, an investigation

Use a range of methods to collect, select, record and organise relevant and reliable information and/or data from multiple sources that reflects the type of analysis of information that is needed (e.g. questionnaires, surveys, emails, discussion lists, tables, field sketches, annotated diagrams), with and without the use of digital and spatial technologies

Identify the origin, purpose and context of primary sources and/or secondary sources

Use appropriate ethical protocols, including specific formats for acknowledging other people's information and understand that these formats vary between organisations

Analysing

Use criteria to analyse the reliability, bias, usefulness and currency of primary sources and/or secondary sources

Analyse information and/or data in different formats (e.g. to explain cause and effect relationships, comparisons, categories and subcategories, change over time)

Account for different interpretations and points of view/perspectives in information and/or data (e.g. from tables, statistics, graphs, models, cartoons, maps, timelines, newspapers)

Analyse the 'big picture' (e.g. put information and/or data into different contexts, reconstruct information by identifying new relationships, identify missing viewpoints or gaps in knowledge)

Apply subject-specific skills and concepts in familiar, new and hypothetical situations

Evaluating

Draw evidence-based conclusions by evaluating information and/or data, taking into account ambiguities and multiple perspectives; to negotiate and resolve contentious issues; to propose individual and collective action in response to contemporary events, challenges, developments, issues, problems and/or phenomena

Critically evaluate information and/or data and ideas from a range of sources to make generalisations and inferences; propose explanations for patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies; predict outcomes

Communicating and reflecting

Select a range of appropriate formats based on their effectiveness to suit audience and purpose, using relevant digital technologies as appropriate

Develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, using evidence from a range of sources to support conclusions and/or arguments

Deconstruct and reconstruct the collected information and/or data into a form that identifies the relationship between the information and the hypothesis, using subject-specific conventions, terminology and concepts

Compare evidence to substantiate judgements (e.g. use information and/or data from different places or times; use tables, graphs, models, theories)

Generate a range of viable options in response to an issue or event to recommend and justify a course of action, and predict the potential consequences of the proposed action

Reflect on why all findings are tentative (e.g. the changing nature of knowledge, changes in circumstances, changes in values)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students construct a range of questions and hypotheses involving cause and effect, patterns and trends, and different perspectives. They use a range of methods to select, record and organise relevant information and/or data from multiple sources. When interpreting sources, students identify their origin and purpose, and draw conclusions about their usefulness. They examine sources to compare different points of view/perspectives and describe different interpretations. Students analyse information and/or data to identify simple patterns, trends, relationships and/or change over time. They draw evidence-based conclusions, using information and/or data to consider multiple perspectives and/or to propose action in response to contemporary challenges. Students develop a range of texts appropriate to the type of discussion and/or explanation required. They use subject-specific terminology and concepts, and provide evidence from a range of sources to support conclusions, and acknowledge these sources.

Students describe some ways individuals and political parties participate within the electoral system in Australia’s democracy. They describe Australia’s court system and how the courts resolve disputes. Students identify the principles of justice and the threats to these principles.

Students explain the interdependence between Australia and other economies by identifying Australia’s trading partners, and describe how specialisation results in the exchange of goods and services between countries. They describe the risks and rewards that result from making consumer and financial choices. Students describe innovations and changes in business, and the implications for the current and future work environment.

Students explain the spatial variation and characteristics of natural environments and the interconnections between people, places and environments. They identify the cause and effect of these interconnections, and predict possible implications for people, places and natural environments, now and in the future. Students make inferences about the spatial outcomes of the interconnections between people, places and environments.

Students explain the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution and World War I over both the short and long term, and the significance of each. Students use evidence to explain patterns of change and continuity over time, and identify the motives and actions of the individuals and groups at that time.



Year 10 Syllabus

Year Level Description

In Year 10 Humanities and Social Sciences consists of Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography and History.

Students develop increasing independence in critical thinking and skill application, which includes questioning, researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to investigate events, developments, issues and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Students continue to build on their understanding of the concepts of democracy, democratic values, justice, and rights and responsibilities by exploring Australia's roles and responsibilities at a global level and its international legal obligations. They inquire in to the values and practices that enable a resilient democracy to be sustained.

Students are introduced to the concept of economic performance and living standards while continuing to further their understanding of the concepts of making choices, interdependence, specialisation, and allocation and markets through examining contemporary issues, events and/or case studies delving into the reasons for variations in the performance of economies. They explore the nature of externalities and investigate the role of governments in managing economic performance to improve living standards. They inquire into the ways businesses can manage their workforces to improve productivity.

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking, through an applied focus on the management of environmental resources and the geography of human wellbeing at the full range of scales, from local to global and in a range of locations.

Students develop their historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts are investigated within the historical context of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on Australia in its global context.

Knowledge and understanding

Civics and Citizenship

Justice at home and overseas

The key features and values of Australia's system of government (e.g. democratic elections, the separation of powers) compared with one other system of government in the Asia region, such as China, Japan, India or Indonesia (ACHCK090)

Australia's roles and responsibilities at a global level (e.g. provision of foreign aid, peacekeeping, participation in international organisations, such as the United Nations) (ACHCK091)

The role of the High Court, including interpreting the Constitution (ACHCK092)

The international agreements Australia has ratified and examples of how they shape government policies and laws (e.g. the protection of World Heritage areas, the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples) (ACHCK093)

The threats to Australia's democracy and other democracies, such as the influence of vested interests, organised crime, corruption and lawlessness (ACHCK094)

The safeguards that protect Australia's democratic system and society, including shared values and the right to dissent within the bounds of the law (ACHCK094)

Economics and Business

Economic performance and living standards

Indicators of economic performance (e.g. economic growth rates, unemployment trends, inflation rates, human development index, quality of life index, sustainability indexes) and how Australia's economy is performing (ACHEK050)

The links between economic performance and living standards, the variations that exist within and between economies and the possible causes (e.g. foreign investment, employment rates and levels of debt) (ACHEK051)

The distribution of income and wealth in the economy and the ways in which governments can redistribute income (e.g. through taxation, social welfare payments) (ACHEK051)

The ways that governments manage the economy to improve economic performance and living standards (e.g. productivity policy, training and workforce development policy, migration), and to minimise the effects of externalities (e.g. regulation) (ACHEK052)

Factors that influence major consumer and financial decisions (e.g. price, availability and cost of finance, marketing of products, age and gender of consumers, convenience, ethical and environmental considerations) and the short-term and long-term consequences of these decisions (ACHEK053)

The ways businesses organise themselves to improve productivity (e.g. provision of training, investment in applications of technology, use of just-in-time inventory systems) (ACHEK054)

Ways that businesses respond to improved economic conditions (e.g. increasing their research and development funding to create innovative products, adjusting marketing strategies to expand their market share) (ACHEK054)

Geography

Environmental change and management

The human-induced environmental changes that challenge sustainability (e.g. water and atmospheric pollution, degradation of land, inland and coastal aquatic environments) (ACHGK070)

The environmental worldviews of people and their implications for environmental management (ACHGK071)

Select one of the following types of environments as the context for a comparative study of an environmental change for Australia and one other country:

  • land 
  • inland water 
  • coast 
  • marine 
  • urban 

The causes and likely consequences of environmental change being investigated (ACHGK073)

The strategies to manage the environmental change being investigated (ACHGK074)

The application of environmental, economic and social criteria in evaluating management responses to the change being investigated (ACHGK075)

Geographies of human wellbeing

The different ways of measuring and mapping human wellbeing and development, and how these can be applied to measure differences between places (ACHGK076)

The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of human wellbeing (ACHGK077)

The issues affecting the development of places and their impact on human wellbeing, drawing on a study from a developing country or region in Africa, South America or the Pacific Islands (ACHGK078)

The role of international and national government and non-government organisations' initiatives in improving human wellbeing in Australia and other countries (ACHGK081)

History

The modern world and Australia

Overview:

  • The inter-war years between World War I and World War II, including the Treaty of Versailles, the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression (ACOKFH018)

Depth study 1: Investigating World War II (1939–1945)

The causes and course of World War II (ACDSEH024)

The experiences of Australians during World War II, such as prisoners of war (POWs), the Battle of Britain, Kokoda and the fall of Singapore (ACDSEH108)

The impact of World War II, with a particular emphasis on the Australian home front, including the changing roles of women and use of wartime government controls (e.g. conscription, manpower controls, rationing, censorship) (ACDSEH109)

An examination of significant events of World War II, including the Holocaust and use of the atomic bomb (ACDSEH107)

Depth study 2: Investigating rights and freedoms (1945–the present)

The origins and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, including Australia's involvement in the development of the declaration (ACDSEH023)

The background to the struggle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples for rights and freedoms before 1965, including the 1938 Day of Mourning and the Stolen Generations (ACDSEH104)

The US civil rights movement and its influence on Australia (ACDSEH105)

The significance of one of the following for the civil rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: 1962 right to vote federally; 1967 referendum; reconciliation; Mabo decision; Bringing Them Home Report (the Stolen Generations); the Apology (ACDSEH106)

Methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and the role of one individual or group in the struggle (ACDSEH134)

Humanities and Social Sciences skills

Questioning and researching

Identify current personal knowledge, gaps, misconceptions, currency of information, personal perspective and possible perspectives of others

Construct, select and evaluate a range of questions and hypotheses involving cause and effect, patterns and trends, and different perspectives

Analyse and clarify the purpose of an inquiry using appropriate methodologies, ethical protocols and concepts to plan for, and inform, an investigation

Use a range of methods to collect, select, record and organise relevant and reliable information and/or data from multiple sources that reflects the type of analysis of information that is needed (e.g. questionnaires, surveys, emails, discussion lists, tables, field sketches, annotated diagrams), with and without the use of digital and spatial technologies

Identify the origin, purpose and context of primary sources and/or secondary sources

Use appropriate ethical protocols, including specific formats for acknowledging other people's information and understand that these formats vary between organisations

Analysing

Use criteria to analyse the reliability, bias, usefulness and currency of primary sources and/or secondary sources

Analyse information and/or data in different formats (e.g. to explain cause and effect relationships, comparisons, categories and subcategories, change over time)

Account for different interpretations and points of view/perspectives in information and/or data (e.g. from tables, statistics, graphs, models, cartoons, maps, timelines, newspapers)

Analyse the 'big picture' (e.g. put information and/or data into different contexts, reconstruct information by identifying new relationships, identify missing viewpoints or gaps in knowledge)

Apply subject-specific skills and concepts in familiar, new and hypothetical situations

Evaluating

Draw evidence-based conclusions by evaluating information and/or data, taking into account ambiguities and multiple perspectives; to negotiate and resolve contentious issues; to propose individual and collective action in response to contemporary events, challenges, developments, issues, problems and/or phenomena

Critically evaluate information and/or data and ideas from a range of sources to make generalisations and inferences; propose explanations for patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies; predict outcomes

Communicating and reflecting

Select a range of appropriate formats based on their effectiveness to suit audience and purpose, using relevant digital technologies as appropriate

Develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, using evidence from a range of sources to support conclusions and/or arguments

Deconstruct and reconstruct the collected information and/or data into a form that identifies the relationship between the information and the hypothesis, using subject-specific conventions, terminology and concepts

Compare evidence to substantiate judgements (e.g. use information and/or data from different places or times; use tables, graphs, models, theories)

Generate a range of viable options in response to an issue or event to recommend and justify a course of action, and predict the potential consequences of the proposed action

Reflect on why all findings are tentative (e.g. the changing nature of knowledge, changes in circumstances, changes in values)

Achievement standard

At Standard, students construct a range of questions and hypotheses involving cause and effect, patterns and trends, and different perspectives. They use a range of methods to select, record and organise relevant information and/or data from multiple sources. When interpreting sources, students identify their origin and purpose, and draw conclusions about their usefulness. They examine sources to compare different points of view/perspectives and describe different interpretations. Students analyse information and/or data to identify simple patterns, trends, relationships and/or change over time. They draw evidence-based conclusions, using information and/or data to consider multiple perspectives and/or to propose action in response to contemporary challenges. Students develop a range of texts appropriate to the type of discussion and/or explanation required. They use subject-specific terminology and concepts, and provide evidence from a range of sources to support conclusions, and acknowledge these sources.

Students describe key features of the Westminster system and Australia’s democratic values. They make comparisons between Australia’s democracy and the political system of one other country. Students identify the international agreements Australia has ratified, and make connections between these agreements and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. They explain how Australia’s democracy, and other democracies, may be undermined, and identify the safeguards that protect Australia’s democratic system.

Students use economic indicators to analyse the economic performance of the Australian economy. They describe how government policy is used to manage the economy and improve economic performance and living standards, including the redistribution of income and wealth. Students describe how businesses respond to changing economic conditions, and explain how the different sectors in the economy are interdependent.

Students describe how the places in which people live influence their wellbeing and opportunities. They describe the interconnections between people and natural environments, and compare how the characteristics of places and natural environments can be influenced, changed and managed by people over time. Students predict the consequences of the changes, and describe the alternate views on strategies to sustainably manage a geographical challenge.

Students identify the causes and effects of World War II and the development of people’s rights and freedoms, describing their significance from a range of perspectives. They refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values, to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. Students describe different interpretations of the past, and identify the evidence used to support these interpretations.



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