French: Second Language

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French: Second Language

Pre-primary year syllabus

Year Level Description

Students enter the early years of school with established communication skills in one or more languages and varying degrees of early literacy capability. Typically, students come to French: Second Language with little to no prior experience of the French language and culture.

In Pre-primary students communicate in French, interacting and exchanging greetings and simple information about themselves with their teacher and peers, through action-related talk and structured play. They participate in shared activities facilitated by movement and gestures, to perform rhymes, songs and stories or to respond to teacher talk and instruction in French. Students recognise pictures, key words and phrases and written French in rhymes, songs and titles and convey factual information about themselves, using gestures and familiar words. They engage by listening to and viewing short imaginative texts, through action and other forms of expression and participate in shared performance of short imaginative texts, playing with sound patterns and non-verbal forms of expression.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, recognising and experimenting with reproducing the common vowel sounds and rhythms of spoken French by singing, reciting and repeating words and phrases in context. They notice and use context-related vocabulary and recognise some first elements of grammar to generate language for purposeful interaction.

In Pre-primary students recognise that while English is the official language spoken in Australia, French is one of many languages, including Aboriginal languages and Torres Strait Islander languages, which is spoken in Australia. They also notice similarities and differences between French and English and begin to develop curiosity around the ideas of language and culture. Creative play in the classroom provides opportunities for exploring these differences.

Students learn French in the early years through rich language input. Regular opportunities to revisit, recycle and review, and continuous feedback, response and encouragement assist students in the language learning process.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact with the teacher and peers through
action-related talk and structured play, to exchange greetings such as Bonjour Madame; Bonjour la classe; Ça va, Emilie ? Ça va bien, merci

Introduce and share information about themselves, for example, Comment t’appelles-tu ? Je m’appelle…; Tu as quel âge ? J’ai cinq ans/Cinq ans; Tu aimes … ? Oui/non
(ACLFRC001)

Participate in shared action with the teacher and peers using simple, repetitive key words, images, movement and songs such as Tourne petit moulin
(ACLFRC002)

Respond to teacher talk and instruction, for example, Lève-toi !; Regardez-moi !; Écoutez !; Doucement !
(ACLFRC003)

Informing

Recognise pictures, symbols, key words and phrases of spoken and written French in rhymes, songs, labels and titles related to their personal worlds
(ACLFRC004)

Convey factual information about their personal worlds using songs, rhymes, gestures, pictures, labels, captions and familiar words
(ACLFRC005)

Creating

Engage by listening to and viewing a range of short, imaginative texts and responding through action, dance, singing, drawing, movement and other forms of expression
(ACLFRC006)

Participate in the shared performance of songs or rhymes, playing with sound patterns, rhyming words and non-verbal forms of expression
(ACLFRC007)

Translating

Share with others familiar French words, phrases, sounds and gestures, noticing how they may have similar or different meanings in English or other known languages
(ACLFRC008)

Reflecting

Begin to notice how French feels/sounds different when speaking, singing a song or hearing it spoken by others compared with using and hearing their own language(s)
(ACLFRC010)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise and experiment with reproducing the common vowel sounds and rhythms of spoken French by singing, reciting and repeating words and phrases in context
(ACLFRU012)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary to generate language

Recognise some first elements of grammar, including:

  • becoming aware of grammatical gender, noticing and using masculine or feminine forms of nouns, for example, le chien, la maison, le copain, la copine
  • noticing appropriate pronouns to identify people, for example, Je m’appelle Adam, et toi ? C’est Adam ?
  • developing number knowledge for numbers
    0–10
  • responding non-verbally to simple imperative verb forms, for example, Lève-toi !; Écoutez!; Regardez-moi !; Doucement !
  • repeating simple questions and statements, for example, Tu t’appelles comment ? C’est un poisson

(ACLFRU013)

Recognise that language is organised as ‘text’ that can be spoken, written, digital, visual or multimodal
(ACLFRU014)

Language variation and change

Recognise that in French, as in English and other languages, there are different ways of greeting and interacting with people, for example, Bonjour Madame, comment ça va ?
(ACLFRU015)

Role of language and culture

Recognise that French is one of many languages spoken in Australia, including Aboriginal languages and Torres Strait Islander languages, Asian languages and world languages
(ACLFRU016) (ACLFRU017)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact in French with their teacher and each other through action-related talk, structured play, classroom instructions and routines to exchange greetings, such as Bonjour! Comment ça va ? Très bien, merci, and to provide simple information about themselves, such as Je m’appelle Marie. J’ai cinq ans. They participate in shared performance of familiar stories and songs and make meaning using verbal and non-verbal forms of expression. Students identify most keywords and some phrases of spoken French relating to their personal worlds and convey most simple, factual information with guidance, using verbal and non-verbal forms of expression. They participate in shared performance of imaginative texts, such as familiar songs and rhymes, and respond with guidance, using verbal and non-verbal forms of expression. They share with others familiar French words, phrases and gestures related to their personal worlds and explore how these may have similar or different meanings in English. They begin to talk about how French feels/sounds different when speaking or hearing it spoken by others.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, experimenting with reproducing the common vowel sounds and rhythms of spoken French with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They recognise and use words and expressions and write simple texts, such as lists and labels, using vocabulary and some first elements of grammar with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students are becoming aware of grammatical gender, identifying and using masculine or feminine forms of nouns, such as le chien and la maison. They identify people using appropriate pronouns, such as Je m’appelle Adam, et toi ? and develop number knowledge for numbers 0–10. They respond non-verbally on occasion to simple imperative verb forms and repeat with satisfactory accuracy, simple questions and statements. They comment on how language is organised as ‘text.’ They identify the different ways of greeting, addressing and interacting with people and usually act accordingly. Students recognise French as one of many languages spoken in Australia and around the world and begin to develop curiosity around the ideas of language and culture.



Year 1 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 1 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required by students to communicate in the French language developed in Pre-primary and focuses on extending their oral communication skills. Typically, the students’ only exposure to and experience of the French language and culture is from their school learning environment.

Students communicate in French, interacting with their teacher and peers to share information about themselves, their age and where they live, and to talk about their favourite things. They participate in guided group activities, using simple repetitive language to support understanding and to convey meaning or to respond to teacher talk and instruction in French. Students locate key words and information in simple texts and convey factual information about their personal worlds using pictures, familiar words and simple statements. They participate in listening to and viewing a range of short imaginative texts and in shared performance of short imaginative texts.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, recognising and reproducing the sounds and rhythms of spoken French and become familiar with the French alphabet, noticing similarities and differences to English. They notice and use context-related vocabulary and recognise some first elements of grammar to generate language for a range of purposeful interactions.

In Year 1 students recognise that Australia is a multilingual society with speakers of many different languages, including French and that French and English borrow words and expressions from each other. They know that language is used differently in different situations and between different people. They identify differences and similarities between their own and others’ languages and cultures.

Students learn French in the early years through rich language input. Regular opportunities to revisit, recycle and review, and continuous feedback, response and encouragement assist students in the language learning process.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact with the teacher and peers, using simple modelled language and gestures, to share information about themselves, their age and where they live and to talk about their favourite things, for example, Moi, j’ai six ans; Où habites-tu ? J’habite à Perth/à la campagne/en banlieue/en ville; J’aime le sport; Moi, je préfère le fromage; Tu as un stylo ? Oui, j’ai un stylo
(ACLFRC001)

Participate in guided group activities, using simple repetitive language in songs, rhymes, games, gestures and pictures to support understanding and to convey meaning
(ACLFRC002)

Respond to teacher talk and instruction, for example, Monsieur, s’il vous plaît?; Je ne comprends pas; Donne-moi le crayon; Voilà/voici…merci
(ACLFRC003)

Informing

Locate key words and information in simple spoken and written texts such as charts, lists, labels and captions, rhymes and songs related to their personal worlds
(ACLFRC004)

Convey factual information about their personal worlds using pictures, labels, captions, familiar words and simple statements
(ACLFRC005)

Creating

Participate in listening to and viewing a range of short, imaginative texts and responding through action, dance, singing, drawing and collaborative retelling
(ACLFRC006)

Participate in the shared performance of songs, rhymes, stories and the presentation of action stories using verbal and non-verbal forms of expression and modelled language
(ACLFRC007)

Translating

Share with others simple French expressions, sounds and gestures, name familiar objects and use French and/or English to conduct simple conversations
(ACLFRC008)

Reflecting

Notice ways of talking in French that appear different to their own ways and become aware of how voice, behaviour and body language may change when speaking French
(ACLFRC010)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise and reproduce the sounds and rhythms of spoken French, noticing similarities and differences to English

Become familiar with the French alphabet, noticing similarities and differences to English, for example, double-v, i-grec and the possible confusion between g and j
(ACLFRU012)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary and some first elements of grammar to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • becoming aware of the French
    subject-verb-object structure, for example, J’aime le basket; Tu as un frère
  • becoming aware of grammatical gender, noticing and using masculine or feminine forms of nouns and adjectives, for example, le chien, la maison, le petit garçon, la petite fille, le copain, la copine
  • using appropriate pronouns to identify people, for example, Je m’appelle Anne, et toi, tu t’appelles comment ?; C’est elle ?
  • recognising and using some prepositions in simple sentence structures, for example, C’est devant la maison ; Je suis sous la chaise
  • developing number knowledge for numbers
    0–31
  • responding to simple imperative verb forms, for example, Viens ici !; Écoutez bien !
  • developing understanding of singular forms of common verbs in the present tense, for example, Je suis Paul and some forms of irregular verbs such as aller, venir and faire
  • noticing and using simple questions and statements, for example, Qu’est-ce que c’est ?; Qui est-ce ?; Tu t’appelles comment ?; C’est un poisson; Je préfère les fraises

(ACLFRU013)

Understand that language is organised as ‘text’ and that different types of texts have different features
(ACLFRU014)

Language variation and change

Recognise that French speakers use language differently in different situations such as when socialising with peers and friends or at home with the family, for example, Un bisou, Papa ! Je t’aime, ma puce !
(ACLFRU015)

Role of language and culture

Recognise that Australia is a multilingual society with speakers of many different languages, including French and that French and English borrow words and expressions from each other
(ACLFRU016) (ACLFRU017)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact in French with their teacher and each other through guided group activities, classroom instructions and routines to provide information about themselves, their age and where they live, and to talk about their favourite things. They use simple modelled language, gestures and other forms of expression, with occasional guidance, to ask questions and make statements, such as Où habites-tu ? J’habite à Perth en ville. Students locate most key words and information in simple spoken and written texts and convey some factual information about their personal worlds using verbal and non-verbal forms of expression. They respond to a range of short imaginative texts and participate in the shared performance and presentation of short texts using familiar verbal and non-verbal forms of expression and well-rehearsed modelled language. When translating, they use French and/or English to share with others simple French expressions, sounds and gestures and to name some familiar objects. Students talk about how voice, behaviour and body language may change when speaking French.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, recognising and reproducing the sounds and rhythms of spoken French with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They identify most similarities and differences in pronunciation to English, and explain that French uses the same alphabet when written. They use words and expressions to convey factual information at word and simple sentence level, and use some first elements of grammar to write simple texts, such as lists, labels and captions with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students begin to use the French subject-verb-object structure, such as J’aime le basket, grammatical gender and masculine or feminine forms of nouns and adjectives, such as le petit garçon and la petite fille. They use appropriate pronouns to identify people and use some prepositions in simple sentence structures. Students develop number knowledge for numbers 0–31 and respond to simple imperative verb forms, such as Écoutez bien !, simple questions and statements. They begin to use singular forms of common verbs in the present tense and some forms of irregular verbs, such as aller, venir and faire. They make some comments about how language is organised as ‘text’ and that different types of texts have different features. They recognise that French speakers use language differently in different situations and usually act accordingly. Students recognise that French is one of the many languages spoken in Australia, and identify some words and expressions that French and English borrow from each other.



Year 2 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 2 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required to communicate in the French language developed in Year 1 and focuses on extending the oral communication skills of students.

Students communicate in French, interacting with their teacher and peers in routine exchanges such as asking each other how they are, offering wishes and talking about events in the day and over the year. They participate in guided group activities, taking turns, exchanging and negotiating, or respond to teacher talk and instruction in French. Students identify specific points of information from familiar types of simple spoken, written or digital texts to complete guided tasks and convey factual information about their personal worlds. They engage with a range of imaginative texts through shared reading, collaborative retelling and performance and create stories and perform imaginative scenarios.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, reproducing the sounds and rhythms of spoken French, experimenting with the pronunciation of vowel combinations and explaining similarities and differences to English. They recognise and begin to write high-frequency words and expressions in familiar contexts. Students notice and use context-related vocabulary and understand some first elements of grammar such as the French subject-verb-object structure, to generate language for a range of purposeful interactions.

In Year 2 students recognise that all languages, including French, continuously change over time through contact with each other and through changes in society. They understand similarities and differences between aspects of French and Australian cultural practices and related language use.

Students learn French in the early years through rich language input. At this stage, play and imaginative activities, music, movement and familiar routines, opportunities to revisit, recycle and review, and continuous feedback, provide the essential scaffolding to assist students in the language learning process.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact with the teacher and peers, using simple descriptive or expressive modelled language and gestures, to participate in routine exchanges such as asking each other how they are, offering wishes and talking about events in the day and over the year, for example, Lundi, je mange une pomme; Mon anniversaire, c’est le trente mars; Bonne fête, Hafiz !; Joyeux Noël !; Aujourd’hui, il fait beau
(ACLFRC001)

Participate in guided group activities, simple tasks, transactions and games, taking turns, exchanging and negotiating, using simple language such as in the game Au marché - Donne-moi deux pommes, s’il te plaît; Donne-moi deux pommes et trois carottes…
(ACLFRC002)

Respond to teacher talk and instruction, for example, C’est à toi ? Non, c’est à moi
(ACLFRC001) (ACLFRC003)

Informing

Identify specific points of information from familiar types of simple spoken, written or digital texts to complete guided tasks related to their personal worlds
(ACLFRC004)

Convey factual information about their personal worlds using familiar words and phrases, simple statements and modelled language
(ACLFRC005)

Creating

Participate in listening to, viewing and reading a range of imaginative texts and responding through action, performance, shared reading and collaborative retelling
(ACLFRC006)

Create stories and perform imaginative scenarios, through role play, mime, drawing, oral discussion or scaffolded writing activities, using familiar words and modelled language
(ACLFRC007)

Translating

Translate for others what they can express in French, interpreting simple expressions and songs and explaining how meanings are similar or different in English or other known languages
(ACLFRC008)

Reflecting

Recognise similarities and differences between aspects of French and Australian cultural practices and related language use
(ACLFRC010)

Understanding

Systems of language

Reproduce the sounds and rhythms of spoken French, noticing how they are represented in words and symbols and explaining similarities and differences to English

Experiment with the pronunciation of vowel combinations ou, eu, au
(ACLFRU012)

Recognise and begin to write high-frequency words and expressions in familiar contexts
(ACLFRU030)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary and understand some first elements of grammar to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • understanding the French subject-verb-object structure, for example, Ma famille est grande; Il a deux amies and the different patterns of adjective-noun order with some common adjectives coming before and some coming after the noun, for example, le grand chien; la jolie fille; le papillon rose
  • noticing definite and indefinite articles in singular or plural forms, for example, la fille, le concert, les croissants; un chapeau, une chaise; des amis, including the l’ form for nouns beginning with a vowel or letter h, for example, l’hiver, l’école
  • recognising and using some prepositions in simple sentence structures, for example, Elle est devant la maison, Je suis sous la chaise
  • developing number knowledge for ordinal numbers, for example, premier, deuxième
  • developing language related to time (hour), months of year and days of week, for example, Il est dix heures; Mardi je vais à l’école; C’est le vingt mars
  • using singular forms of common verbs in the present tense, for example, Je suis chinois; Tu as trois frères; Il aime le football; Papa est grand, and some forms of irregular verbs such as aller, venir and faire
  • using simple questions and statements, for example, Qu’est-ce que c’est ?; Qui est-ce ?

(ACLFRU013)

Understand that language is organised as ‘text’ that takes different forms and uses different structures and features to achieve its purpose
(ACLFRU014)

Language variation and change

Understand that French speakers use language differently in different situations and according to cultural norms such as when at home with the family or in the classroom, for example, Pardon, Monsieur Falcon; Je suis désolé...
(ACLFRU015)

Role of language and culture

Recognise that all languages, including French, continuously change over time through contact with each other and through changes in society
(ACLFRU016) (ACLFRU017)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact in French with their teacher and each other through routine exchanges, guided group activities, instructions and transactions, to share information about how they are, offer wishes and talk about events in the day and over the year. They use simple descriptive or expressive modelled language and gestures, such as Aujourd’hui, il fait beau. Students identify some specific points of information in simple texts to mostly complete guided tasks and they make use of familiar words and phrases, simple statements and modelled language, to convey factual information about their personal worlds. They listen to, view and read a range of imaginative texts and respond using simple verbal and non-verbal forms of expression and some modelled language. They create stories with some guidance and perform imaginative scenarios, using familiar words and modelled language. They translate for others some of what they can express in French, and state how meanings are similar or different in English. Students identify some similarities and differences between cultural practices and related language use of French-speaking communities and Australia.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, reproducing the sounds and rhythms of spoken French, and the pronunciation of vowel sounds ou, eu and au with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use words and expressions to convey factual information at word and simple sentence level, and some first elements of grammar to write simple texts, such as lists, captions and descriptions with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use the French subject-verb-object structure and the different patterns of adjective-noun order, such as le grand chien and la jolie fille. They begin to use definite and indefinite articles in singular or plural forms and some prepositions in simple sentence structures, such as Elle est devant la maison. They develop number knowledge for ordinal numbers and time words associated with months of year and days of week, to talk and write about events in their personal worlds. They use singular forms of common verbs in the present tense, such as Il aime le football and some forms of irregular verbs, such as aller, venir and faire. They use simple questions and statements, such as Qu’est-ce que c’est ?They identify some different forms of texts that use different structures and features to achieve their purpose. Students identify some ways that French speakers use language differently in different situations, and between different people, and some ways that the French language has changed over time through its contact with other languages and changes in society.



Year 3 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 3 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required to communicate in the French language developed in Year 2 and focuses on extending the oral and written communication skills of students. They benefit from varied, activity-based learning that builds on their interests and capabilities and makes connections with other areas of learning.

Students communicate in French, interacting and socialising with their teacher and peers to exchange information about friends and family members. They participate in class experiences and everyday transactions that involve following instructions, asking questions and making statements. Students locate specific points of information in a range of short spoken, written or multimodal texts and convey factual information about their personal worlds in simple statements, short descriptions and modelled texts. They participate in and respond to a range of imaginative texts, identifying and comparing favourite elements and making simple statements about characters or themes. Students create and perform short imaginative texts that use familiar expressions and modelled language as well as simple visual supports.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, experimenting with the pronunciation of common vowel sounds letter combinations and intonation patterns. They recognise and begin to write
high-frequency words and expressions in familiar contexts. Students notice and use context-related vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposeful interactions such as the relationship between subject pronouns and verb endings and an increasing range of adjectives. They begin to develop a metalanguage in French for talking about language, using terms similar to those used in English.

Students are encouraged to describe their French learning experiences and explore their own sense of identity and ways that they use language differently when they are interacting with different people.

In Year 3 students require extensive support with their language learning. Tasks are carefully scaffolded, models and examples are provided along with support for self-monitoring and reflection. Students are encouraged to use French as much as possible for classroom routines, social interactions and for learning tasks.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact and socialise with the teacher and peers, using simple descriptive or expressive modelled language and gestures, to exchange information about friends and family members, for example, J’ai deux sœurs et j’ai un frère; Mon frère s’appelle Jack; Mon amie Julie est très jolie !; Elle a six ans; Mon grand-père est très gentil !

Participate in routine exchanges such as asking each other how they are and offering wishes, for example, Salut, Nicole, ça va ? Pas mal, et toi ?; Bonjour, Madame Patou, comment allez-vous ?; Bonne nuit, Papa !; Bonjour Messieurs; A demain, Mademoiselle; A bientôt !; Bon courage !
(ACLFRC019)

Participate in class experiences, activities and everyday transactions that involve following instructions, asking questions and making statements, asking for help and permission
(ACLFRC020)

Informing

Locate specific points of information in a range of short written, spoken, multimodal and digital texts related to their personal worlds
(ACLFRC022)

Convey factual information about their personal worlds in simple statements, short descriptions and modelled texts
(ACLFRC023)

Creating

Participate in and respond to a range of imaginative texts, acting out events, identifying and comparing favourite elements and making simple statements about characters or themes
(ACLFRC024)

Create and perform short imaginative texts that use familiar expressions and modelled language as well as simple visual supports
(ACLFRC025)

Translating

Translate high-frequency words and expressions in simple texts such as captions, story titles or recurring lines in a story, noticing which ones are difficult to interpret
(ACLFRC026)

Reflecting

Notice what looks or feels similar or different to their own language and culture when interacting in French, for example, gestures such as la bise or pronunciation of some sounds
(ACLFRC028)

Understanding

Systems of language

Experiment with the pronunciation of common vowel sounds, for example, ou (vous, jour), oi (toi, voiture), on (bonbon, mon), ai (aimer, j’ai), ain (train, demain) and eau (château, beau), letter combinations and intonation patterns

Recognise and write high-frequency words and expressions in familiar contexts
(ACLFRU030)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • observing the relationship between subject pronouns and verb endings, using je/tu/il/elle + present tense of verbs associated with familiar actions and environments, for example, Il chante bien; Je suis fatigué; Tu aimes le yaourt; Elle est en classe
  • understanding the difference between definite and indefinite articles and how to refer to a specific or unspecific person, place or object, for example, J’aime la musique; Le chien est brun; J’ai un frère; Il a une amie
  • using an increasing range of adjectives, for example, bizarre, magnifique, formidable, including additional gender forms, for example, blanc/blanche, gros/grosse
  • developing number knowledge for numbers
    0–100

Begin to develop a metalanguage in French for talking about language, using terms similar to those used in English
(ACLFRU031)

Recognise the particular language features and textual conventions in simple, familiar, spoken, written and multimodal French texts
(ACLFRU032)

Language variation and change

Understand and demonstrate how language use varies according to the participants’ age, gender and relationship and the context of use
(ACLFRU033)

Role of language and culture

Notice differences between French, Australian and other cultures’ practices and how these are reflected in language
(ACLFRU018)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact and socialise in French with their teacher and each other through class experiences, activities and everyday transactions, to exchange information about friends and family members. They use simple descriptive or expressive modelled language and gestures to provide information, ask questions and make statements, such as Salut, Nicole, ça va ?, Mon amie Julie est très jolie ! and J’ai deux sœurs et j’ai un frère. They locate specific points of information in a range of short texts and convey factual information about their personal worlds using familiar words, simple statements and modelled texts. Students participate in and respond to a range of imaginative texts, acting out events, identifying and comparing favourite elements and making simple statements about characters or theme. They create and perform short imaginative texts that use familiar expressions, modelled language and simple visual supports. Students use some modelled strategies to translate, with a satisfactory level of accuracy, familiar words and most expressions in simple texts. When interacting in French, students identify similarities or differences between French and their own language and culture.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, reproducing common vowel sounds, letter combinations ou, oi, on, ai, ain and eau, and intonation patterns. They write words, expressions and short texts, such as descriptions or simple narratives using vocabulary and applying elements of grammar with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use je/tu/il/elle + present tense of verbs and apply the relationship between subject pronouns and verb endings, such as Je suis fatigue. They distinguish between definite and indefinite articles and are able to refer to a specific or unspecific person, place or object, such as Il a une amie and Le chien est brun. Theyuse an increasing range of adjectives, such as magnifique and formidable and develop their number knowledge from 0-100. They begin to describe their French learning experiences and use terms, such as verb, adjective and gender, to talk about language and learning. They apply some of the language features and textual conventions in simple, familiar texts. Students show how the French language may need to be adjusted to suit different situations and relationships. They identify the differences between French, Australian and other cultures’ practices and how these are reflected in language.



Year 4 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 4 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required to communicate in the French language developed in Year 3 and focuses on extending the oral and written communication skills of students.

Students communicate in French, interacting and socialising with the teacher and peers to exchange information about aspects of their personal worlds, including their daily routines at home and school, and their interests. They contribute collaboratively to class experiences that involve asking for help, clarification and permission, solving problems and sharing decisions. Students locate and process factual information in written, spoken and multimodal texts and gather and convey factual information and short descriptions from familiar texts related to their personal and social worlds. They participate in and respond to a range of imaginative texts, discuss messages and make statements about characters or themes. Students create and perform short imaginative texts that allow for exploration and enjoyment of language and cultural expression, using familiar expressions and modelled language.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, experimenting with the pronunciation of vowel sounds and intonation patterns. They notice and use context-related vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in simple spoken and written texts such as the present tense, to generate language for a range of purposeful interactions. Students begin to develop a metalanguage in French for talking about language, using terms similar to those used in English.

Students are encouraged to define their French learning experiences and make connections between culture and language use by identifying vocabulary and expressions that reflect different cultural values, traditions or practices.

In Year 4 students continue to require extensive support with their language learning. Purposeful communicative activities and experiences are planned, models and examples are provided, along with support for self-monitoring and reflection. Language experience and input include authentic texts that may require some modification to include familiar vocabulary and simple sentence structures. Students continue to be encouraged to use French as much as possible for social interactions and in learning tasks.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact and socialise with the teacher and peers, using simple descriptive or expressive modelled language, to exchange information about aspects of their personal worlds, including their daily routines at home and school and their interests, for example, J’arrive à l’école à 8h 30; Le samedi, je fais du cheval et le dimanche je joue au netball; J’aime les sports et les voyages — mais mon ami adore la musique !
(ACLFRC019)

Contribute collaboratively to class experiences, activities and transactions that involve asking for help, clarification and permission, solving problems and sharing decisions such as creating a display or conducting a role play or scenario, science experiments, cooking or craft activities
(ACLFRC020)

Informing

Locate and process factual information in a range of written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLFRC022)

Gather and convey factual information, simple statements and short descriptions from familiar texts related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLFRC023)

Creating

Participate in and respond to a range of imaginative texts, discussing messages and using modelled language to make statements about characters or themes
(ACLFRC024)

Create and perform short imaginative texts that allow for exploration and enjoyment of language, cultural expression and performance, using familiar expressions, simple statements and modelled language
(ACLFRC025)

Translating

Translate words, phrases and expressions in simple texts, for example, La chenille qui fait des trous and The Very Hungry Caterpillar; La vieille dame qui avala une mouche and The Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly, to compare meanings and share understandings about aspects of French language and culture that are different from English

Use visual, print or online dictionaries, word lists and pictures to translate simple familiar texts such as labels or captions
(ACLFRC026)

Reflecting

Notice and describe how language reflects cultural practices and norms
(ACLFRC028)

Understanding

Systems of language

Experiment with the pronunciation of vowel sounds, word endings shared with English such as –tion
and –ent and intonation patterns

Write high-frequency words and expressions in familiar contexts
(ACLFRU030)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • observing the relationship between subject pronouns and verb endings, using je/tu/il/elle/on + present tense of verbs associated with familiar actions and environments, for example, Il se lève à sept heures; Je vais à l’ecole à huit heures; Tu aimes le français; Elle est en classe; On commence à 8h30
  • expressing negation in simple sentence structures and colloquial expressions, for example, Je ne sais pas; Elle ne mange pas; Tu ne viens pas ?; Pas du tout !
  • using an increasing range of adjectives including additional gender forms, for example, blanc/blanche, gros/grosse, petit/petite, grand/grande
  • using some adverbs to elaborate on simple verb statements, for example, Elle mange lentement; Je chante doucement; Il parle très vite

Begin to develop a metalanguage in French for talking about language, using terms similar to those used in English
(ACLFRU031)

Notice differences in familiar texts such as personal, informative and imaginative texts and explain how particular features of such texts help to achieve their purpose
(ACLFRU032)

Language variation and change

Understand that different ways of using French language reflect different regions and countries, different relationships and different ways of making meaning
(ACLFRU033)

Role of language and culture

Understand that French is an important global language used by communities in many countries around the world and that it has connections with several other languages

Make connections between language and culture use by identifying vocabulary and expressions that reflect different cultural values, traditions or practices
(ACLFRU035) (ACLFRU036)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact and socialise in French with their teacher and each other through class experiences, activities and transactions, to exchange information about aspects of their personal worlds, daily routines at home and school, and their interests. They use simple descriptive or expressive modelled language with guidance, to provide information, ask questions and make statements, such as Le samedi, je fais du cheval et le dimanche, je joue au netball. Students locate, process and convey some factual information and simple statements from familiar texts related to their personal and social worlds. They respond to a range of imaginative texts, discussing messages, mostly in English and using modelled language, to make statements and express opinions about characters or theme. They create and perform short imaginative texts, using familiar expressions, simple statements and modelled language. Students share meanings and attempt to interpret aspects of French language and culture by translating familiar words, phrases and simple expressions in simple texts to share understandings about aspects of French language and culture that are different from English. They use dictionaries with guidance, word lists and pictures to translate simple familiar texts. Students make some comments about how language reflects cultural practices and norms.

Students become familiar with the systems of the French language, reproducing vowel sounds, word endings shared with English, such as –tion and –ent and intonation patterns with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in simple spoken and written texts with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They observe the relationship between subject pronouns and verb endings, using je/tu/il/elle/on + present tense of verbs associated with familiar actions and environments, such as Je vais à l’ecole à huit heures. They express negation in simple sentence structures and colloquial expressions. They use an increasing range of adjectives including additional gender forms, and use some adverbs to elaborate on simple verb statements. Students begin to describe how the French language works, using terms similar to those used in English with guidance. They make some simple comparisons between features of familiar texts and explain with guidance, how particular features of such texts help to achieve their purpose. Students describe how different ways of using French language reflect different places, relationships and ways of making meaning. They state that French is an important global language and list connections with several other languages. Students make some connections between language and culture use by identifying vocabulary and expressions that reflect different cultural values, traditions or practices.



Year 5 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 5 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the French language developed in Year 4 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of French language and culture.

Students communicate in French, initiating interactions with the teacher and peers to exchange information about their home, neighbourhood and local community. They participate in guided tasks, planning outings or activities and completing transactions. They gather, compare and convey information from a range of spoken, written and multimodal texts related to their personal and social worlds. Students share responses to characters, events and ideas in imaginative texts and make connections with their own experience and feelings. They create or reinterpret, present or perform imaginative texts, based on or adapted from events, characters or settings.

Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the French language, recognising and applying features of intonation and pronunciation. They use context-related vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of grammatical elements in simple spoken and written texts such as understanding the function of and using verb moods and tenses to generate language for a range of purposes. Students build a metalanguage in French to comment on vocabulary and grammar, describe patterns, grammatical rules and variations in language structures.

Students are encouraged to reflect on how their own and others’ language use is shaped by and reflects communities’ ways of thinking and behaving and may be differently interpreted by others.

In Year 5 students are widening their social networks, experiences and communication repertoires in both their first language and French. They are supported to use French as much as possible for classroom routines and interactions, structured learning tasks and language experimentation and practice. English is predominantly used for discussion, clarification, explanation, analysis and reflection.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate interactions with the teacher and peers, using descriptive and expressive language to exchange information about their home, neighbourhood and local community, for example, J’habite dans une vieille maison à East Fremantle, près de la rivière et un grand parc; La ville est à deux heures à pied; Le week-end je vais au café ou je fais du shopping, avec mes amis; Je vais à l’école en bus
(ACLFRC037)

Participate in guided tasks related to organising displays, planning outings and conducting events such as performances, or activities such as building models and completing transactions in places such as a café or a market
(ACLFRC038)

Informing

Gather and compare information and supporting details from a range of written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLFRC040)

Gather and convey information and ideas in different formats from a range of texts related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLFRC041)

Creating

Share responses to characters, events and ideas in imaginative texts such as stories, dialogues, cartoons, television programs or films and make connections with their own experience and feelings
(ACLFRC042)

Create or reinterpret, present or perform imaginative texts for different audiences, based on or adapted from events, characters or settings
(ACLFRC043)

Translating

Translate simple texts from French to English and vice versa, noticing which words or phrases require interpretation or explanation

Use visual, print or online dictionaries, word lists and pictures to translate short familiar texts
(ACLFRC044)

Reflecting

Compare ways of communicating in Australian and French-speaking contexts and identify ways in which culture influences language use
(ACLFRC046)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise and apply features of intonation and pronunciation such as using liaisons (joyeux anniversaire), silent letters (h), the aigué and conveying meaning with pitch, stress and rhythm
(ACLFRF048)

Use context-related vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of grammatical elements in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • observing the relationship between subject pronouns and verb endings, using je/tu/il/elle/on/vous + present tense of verbs associated with familiar actions and environments, -er, -ir and -re verbs and common irregular verbs such as avoir, être, aller and faire
  • formulating questions using Est-ce que… ? and recognising the inverted form of the verb, or changed intonation, for example, Est-ce que tu as une piscine chez-toi ?; As-tu une piscine chez-toi ?; Tu as une piscine chez-toi ?
  • understanding the function of verb moods, recognising and knowing how to use imperatives, for example Commence !; Écoutez !; Allons-y !
  • using additional prepositions to indicate direction or location, for example, à gauche, à droite,
    à côté de…

Build a metalanguage in French to comment on vocabulary and grammar, describe patterns, grammatical rules and variations in language structures
(ACLFRF049)

Recognise that spoken, written and multimodal French texts have certain conventions and can take different forms depending on the context in which they are produced
(ACLFRF050)

Language variation and change

Understand that there are variations in French as it is used in different contexts by different people such as formal/informal register and regional variations
(ACLFRF051)

Role of language and culture

Understand that there are different forms of spoken and written French used in different contexts within France and in other regions of the world

Reflect on how their own and others’ language use is shaped by and reflects communities’ ways of thinking and behaving and may be differently interpreted by others
(ACLFRF053) (ACLFRF054)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate, with guidance, interactions in French with their teacher and each other through guided tasks, class experiences, activities and transactions to exchange information about their home, neighbourhood and local community. They use mostly familiar descriptive and expressive language to participate in tasks or activities or to provide information, such as Le week-end je vais au café ou je fais du shopping, avec mes amis. Students gather and compare most information and some supporting details, and convey information and ideas in different formats from a range of texts related to their personal and social worlds. They share simple responses to characters, events and ideas in imaginative texts and make simple connections with their own experience and feelings. They create and present, with guidance, imaginative texts for different audiences, based on or adapted from events, characters or settings. Students translate with a satisfactory level of accuracy simple texts from French to English and vice versa, showing some awareness that there are words or phrases that require interpretation or explanation. They use dictionaries with guidance, word lists and pictures to translate short familiar texts. Students identify ways in which culture influences language use and provide simple examples when comparing ways of communicating in Australian and French-speaking contexts.

Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the French language, applying features of intonation and pronunciation, such as using liaisons, silent letters (h), the aigu –é and conveying meaning with pitch, stress and rhythm with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use a range of vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of grammatical elements in simple spoken and written texts with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students observe the relationship between subject pronouns and verb endings, using je/tu/il/elle/on/vous + present tense of verbs associated with familiar actions and environments, -er, -ir and -re verbs and common irregular verbs, such as avoir, être, aller and faire. They formulate questions using Est-ce que … ? and use the inverted form of the verb, or changed intonation. Students identify the function of verb moods and know how to use imperatives. They use additional prepositions to indicate direction or location. Students talk about how the French language works, commenting on vocabulary and grammar, describing patterns, grammatical rules and variations in language structures with guidance. They identify that texts have certain conventions and can take different forms. They explain that the differences in how people use French may be due to differences in register and regional variations. Students discuss how their own and others’ language use is shaped by and reflects communities’ ways of thinking and behaving, and may be differently interpreted by others.



Year 6 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 6 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the French language developed in Year 5 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of French language and culture. Students gain greater independence and become more conscious of their peers and social context. As they gain a greater awareness of the world around them they also become more aware of the similarities and differences between the French language and culture and their own.

Students communicate in French, initiating interactions with others to exchange information and relate experiences about free time. They participate in routine exchanges to express feelings, opinions and personal preferences about people, things and places. Students collaborate with peers in guided tasks to plan events or activities or to showcase their progress in learning and using French. They gather, compare and respond to information and supporting details from a range of written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts related to their personal and social worlds and convey information, ideas and opinions, selecting appropriate texts to suit specific audiences and contexts. Students share and compare responses to a variety of imaginative texts. They create or reinterpret, present or perform alternative versions of imaginative texts for different audiences to suit different modes or contexts.

Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the French language, explaining and applying features of intonation, pronunciation and writing conventions used in different contexts and types of texts. They use context-related vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of grammatical elements in simple spoken and written texts such as using the present tense and becoming familiar with le passé composé to generate language for a range of purposes. Students begin to build a metalanguage in French to describe patterns, grammatical rules and variations in language structures.

Students understand that the French language is constantly changing due to contact with other languages and to the impact of new technologies and knowledge. They also understand that language and culture are integral to the nature of identity and communication.

In Year 6 students continue to widen their social networks, experiences and communication repertoires in both their first language and French. They are encouraged to use French as much as possible for interactions, structured learning tasks and language experimentation and practice.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate interactions with others, using descriptive and expressive language to exchange information and relate experiences about free time, for example, Le soir, je fais les devoirs et je joue aux jeux vidéo ou je surfe sur Internet. Et toi ?; Qu’est-ce que tu fais le soir ?; Est-ce que tu veux aller au café ?; Quand il fait beau, je vais à la plage

Participate in routine exchanges to express feelings, opinions and personal preferences such as C’est mon frère — il est sympa !; Excuse-moi Sophie, mais…à mon avis; Je pense que…bien sûr…; Je ne suis pas d’accord…
(ACLFRC037)

Collaborate with peers in guided tasks to plan events or activities to showcase their progress in learning and using French, developing projects or budgeting for a shared event
(ACLFRC038)

Informing

Gather, compare and respond to information and supporting details from a range of written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLFRC040)

Convey information, ideas and opinions related to their personal and social worlds, selecting appropriate written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts to suit specific audiences and contexts
(ACLFRC041)

Creating

Share and compare responses to characters, events and ideas and identify cultural elements in a variety of imaginative texts
(ACLFRC042)

Create or reinterpret, present or perform alternative versions of imaginative texts for different audiences, adapting stimulus, theme, characters, places, ideas and events to suit different modes or contexts
(ACLFRC043)

Translating

Translate and interpret short texts from French to English and vice versa, recognising that words and meanings do not always correspond across languages and expanding descriptions or giving examples where necessary to assist meaning

Experiment with bilingual dictionaries and/or online translators, considering the relative advantages or limitations of each resource
(ACLFRC044)

Reflecting

Engage in intercultural experiences, describing aspects of language and culture that are unfamiliar and discussing their own reactions and adjustments
(ACLFRC046)

Understanding

Systems of language

Explain and apply features of intonation, pronunciation and writing conventions used in different contexts and types of texts
(ACLFRF048)

Use context-related vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of grammatical elements in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • using je/tu/il/elle/on/nous/vous/ils/elles + present tense of regular -er, -ir and -re verbs and of high‑frequency irregular verbs such as avoir, être, aller and faire
  • using the indicative + the infinitive, for example, J’aime jouer au tennis; Ils vont faire du surf and le futur proche, for example, Je vais partir
  • becoming familiar with le passé composé, for example, J’ai mangé trois biscuits; Elle a dormi sous les étoiles
  • formulating questions using Est-ce que… ? and experimenting with inverted form of the verb, or changed intonation, for example, Est-ce que tu joues de la guitare ?; Joues-tu de la guitare ?; Tu joues de la guitare ?
  • understanding and using negative constructions, for example, Tu ne viens pas au cinéma ?, and including the use of de after a negative verb form, for example, Je n’ai pas de photos
  • using exclamations to indicate agreement, disagreement, intention or understanding, for example, D’accord !; Mais non !; Bien sûr !; Voilà !

Build a metalanguage in French to describe patterns, grammatical rules and variations in language structures
(ACLFRF049)

Understand how French texts use language in ways that create different effects and suit different audiences
(ACLFRF050)

Language variation and change

Understand that the French language is used differently in different contexts and situations
(ACLFRF051)

Role of language and culture

Understand that the French language is constantly changing due to contact with other languages and to the impact of new technologies and knowledge

Understand that language and culture are integral to the nature of identity and communication
(ACLFRF052) (ACLFRF054)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate, with guidance, interactions in French with others through collaborative tasks, class experiences, activities and transactions to exchange information and relate experiences about free time. They use mostly descriptive and expressive language to express feelings, opinions and personal preferences, such as C’est mon frère — il est sympa ! and Excuse-moi Sophie, mais … à mon avis … . Students collaborate with peers in guided tasks to plan events or activities to showcase their progress in learning and using French, developing projects or budgeting for a shared event. They gather, compare and respond to most information and some supporting details from texts related to their personal and social worlds and they convey simple information, ideas and opinions, selecting appropriate texts to suit specific audiences and contexts. Students share and compare with some guidance, responses to characters, events and ideas and identify several cultural elements in a variety of imaginative texts. They create or present, occasionally with guidance, simple alternative versions of imaginative texts for different audiences, adapting elements for different modes or contexts. They translate short texts from French to English and vice versa, explaining or providing a description, with guidance, to some familiar words or expressions that do not directly translate between languages. Students experiment with and discusses the usefulness of various forms of dictionaries. They engage in intercultural experiences, describing some aspects of language and culture that are unfamiliar and discuss their own reactions and adjustments.

Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the French language, explaining and applying features of intonation, pronunciation and writing conventions used in different contexts and types of texts with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of grammatical elements in simple spoken and written texts with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use je/tu/il/elle/on/nous/vous/ils/elles + present tense of regular -er, -ir and -re verbs and of high-frequency irregular verbs. They use the indicative plus the infinitive,such as Ils vont faire du surf, le futur proche, such as Je vais partir and become familiar with le passé compose. They formulate questions using Est-ce que … ? and experiment with the inverted form of the verb, or changed intonation. Students use negative constructions, and include the use of de after a negative verb form. They use exclamations to indicate agreement, disagreement, intention or understanding. Students describe, with guidance, how the French language works, describing patterns, grammatical rules and variations in language structures. They discuss how French texts use language in ways that create different effects and suit different audiences, and explain how the French language is used differently in different contexts and situations. Students discuss how the French language is constantly changing due to contact with other languages and the impact of new technologies and knowledge, and explain how language and culture are integral to the nature of identity and communication.



Year 7 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 7 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the French language developed in Year 6 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of French language and culture. Some students begin Year 7 with proficiency in languages other than French and bring existing language learning strategies and intercultural awareness to the new experience of learning French. Their growing textual knowledge, developed through English literacy, supports their developing French literacy. Skills in analysing, comparing and reflecting on language and culture in both languages are mutually supportive.

Students communicate in French, initiating and participating in spoken and written interactions with peers and known adults to talk about, give opinions, share thoughts and feelings on people, social events and school experiences. They engage in tasks and activities that involve planning, negotiating arrangements and participating in transactions. Students access and summarise key information and supporting details from texts. They organise and present information and ideas on texts, using descriptive and expressive language and modes of presentation to suit different audiences and contexts. Students respond to a range of imaginative texts by expressing opinions about the themes, values and techniques used to engage audiences. They create and present simple imaginative texts such as songs or stories that involve imagined characters, places and experiences.

Students better understand the systems of the French language, recognising individual elements of spoken and written words, phrases and non-verbal forms of expression and notice how they reinforce spoken language. They extend their knowledge of context-related vocabulary and additional elements of grammar such as using le présent and le passé composé and becoming familiar with l’imparfait when encountered in familiar expressions and scaffolded language contexts. Students continue to build a metalanguage in French to describe patterns, grammatical rules and variations in language structures.

In Year 7 students reflect on changes in their own use of language(s) over time, noticing how and when new ways are adopted or existing ways adapted. The practice of reviewing and consolidating prior learning is balanced against the provision of engaging and relevant new experiences and connections.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate and participate in spoken and written interactions with peers and known adults, using rehearsed descriptive and expressive language to talk about, give opinions, share thoughts and feelings on people, social events and school experiences, for example, Ma sœur m’ennuie parce que…; Hier soir, je suis allé au cinéma avec mes amis. Nous nous sommes bien amusés; Ce que je déteste/j’adore, c’est la musique/l’informatique /les maths; S’il faut redoubler… !
(ACLFRC055)

Engage in tasks and activities that involve planning such as hosting a French class or visitor, an excursion to a French restaurant, the cinema, a music concert, or a vide-grenier or marché aux puces, considering options, negotiating arrangements and participating in transactions
(ACLFRC056)

Informing

Access and summarise key information and supporting details from texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds
(ACLFRC058)

Organise and present information and ideas on texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, using descriptive and expressive language and modes of presentation to suit different audiences and contexts
(ACLFRC059)

Creating

Respond to a range of imaginative texts by expressing opinions about the themes and key ideas, values and techniques used to engage and entertain audiences
(ACLFRC060)

Create and present simple, individual and shared imaginative texts such as songs, poems, plays or stories that involve imagined characters, places and experiences, to entertain peers and younger audiences
(ACLFRC061)

Translating

Translate texts and compare their own translation to classmates’, noticing when it is difficult to transfer meaning from one language to the other
(ACLFRC062)

Reflecting

Interact and engage with members of the
French-speaking community to share and compare aspects of culture that affect communication and notice how own culture impacts on language use, for example, ways of expressing feelings or politeness protocols associated with social events

(ACLFRC064)

Consider how their own biography, including personal experiences, family origins, traditions and beliefs, interests and experience, influences their identity and communication
(ACLFRC065)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise individual elements of spoken and written words, phrases and non-verbal forms of expression and notice how they reinforce spoken language, for example, hand gestures to express C’est nul; Ça suffit !; Quoi encore; or sounds and facial expressions such as Oh là là !; Aïe !; T’as fait quoi ?
(ACLFRU066)

Extend knowledge of context-related vocabulary and additional elements of grammar, including:

  • using reflexive verbs in le présent
  • increasing control of the conjugation of regular verbs in le présent and of high-frequency irregular verbs such as avoir, être, faire, devoir, vouloir, savoir, aller
  • extending use of l’impératif and le futur proche
  • using le passé composé and becoming familiar with l’imparfait when encountered in familiar expressions and scaffolded language contexts, for example, Il était une fois…; C’était…;Je suis allé au cinéma. C'était amusant
  • extending use of interrogative questions using Est-ce que… ? and with inverted form of the verb or changed intonation, for example, Est-ce que tu joues de la guitare ?; Joues-tu de la guitare ?; Tu joues de la guitare ?
  • extending knowledge of negative constructions such as ne…plus, ne…rien, ne…jamais, ne…que…
  • using comparatives such as plus…que, moins…que, aussi…que + adjective, for example, J’aime le français plus que les maths car c’est plus intéressant

Continue to build a metalanguage to describe grammatical concepts and to organise learning resources
(ACLFRU067)

Understand the structures, conventions and purpose associated with a range of texts created for information exchange or social interaction
(ACLFRU068)

Language variation and change

Examine how elements of communication such as gestures, facial expressions and choice of language vary according to context and situation
(ACLFRU069)

Reflect on changes in their own use of language(s) over time, noticing how and when new ways are adopted or existing ways adapted
(ACLFRU070)

Role of language and culture

Understand that language use reflects cultural expression, assumptions and perspectives
(ACLFRU072)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in spoken and written interactions in French with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to exchange information on people, social events and school experiences. They use rehearsed descriptive and expressive language to talk about, give some opinions and share thoughts and feelings, such as Hier soir, je suis allé au cinéma avec mes amis. Nous nous sommes bien amusés and Ce que j’adore, c’est le français. Students engage in the planning of French events or activities by considering options, negotiating arrangements and participating in transactions. They identify and summarise most key information, and some supporting details, and they organise and present information and ideas on texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, using modes of presentation to suit audiences and contexts. Students express simple opinions and describe some of the themes and key ideas, values and techniques used to engage and entertain audiences in a range of imaginative texts. They create and present simple, individual and shared imaginative texts with imagined characters, places and experiences, to entertain peers and younger audiences. They translate texts, with some inaccuracies, and compare their own translation to peers’, noticing when it is difficult to transfer meaning from one language to the other. Students interact and engage with French speakers to share and compare some aspects of culture that affect communication, and notice how their own culture impacts on language use. They also consider how their biography influences their identity and communication.

Students better understand the systems of the French language, identifying elements of spoken and written words, phrases and non-verbal forms of expression. They use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in spoken and written texts, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use reflexive verbs in le présent and le passé composé, and become familiar with l’imparfait when encountered in familiar expressions and scaffolded language contexts, for example, C’était… and Je suis allé au cinéma. They extend their use of l’impératif and le futur proche. Students extend their use of interrogative questions using Est-ce que … ? and with the inverted form of the verb, or changed intonation. Students extend their knowledge of negative constructions, such as ne…plus, ne…rien, ne…jamais, ne…que…, and use comparatives, for example, J’aime le français plus que les maths car c’est plus intéressant. Students describe how the French language works, using some relevant metalanguage to organise learning resources. They discuss and apply the structures, conventions and purposes associated with a range of texts created for information exchange or social interaction. Students examine how elements of communication and choice of language vary according to context and situation, and reflect on changes in their use of language(s) over time, noticing how and when new ways are adopted or existing ways adapted. Students identify some ways in which language use reflects cultural expression, assumptions and perspectives.



Year 8 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 8 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the French language developed in Year 7 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of French language and culture. Students may need encouragement to take risks in learning a language at this stage of social development and to consider issues of how the experience impacts on the sense of ‘norms’ associated with their first language and culture.

Students communicate in French, initiating and maintaining spoken and written interactions with peers and known adults to discuss and share ideas, views, opinions and experiences of special holidays and travel. They engage in tasks that involve planning, considering options, negotiating arrangements, solving problems and participating in transactions. Students summarise and share information from texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds and present them in different formats for the intended audience. Students respond to a range of imaginative texts, analysing ideas and techniques used to entertain audiences and make connections with personal experiences and other imaginative texts in their own language and culture. They create and present a range of simple imaginative texts to enrich the visual or listening experience.

Students better understand the systems of the French language, recognising individual elements of spoken and written words, phrases and non-verbal forms of expression and notice how they combine to make or to change meaning. They continue to extend their knowledge of context-related vocabulary and additional elements of grammar such as increasing control of the conjugation of regular verbs and of high-frequency irregular verbs in a number of tenses, when encountered in familiar expressions and scaffolded language contexts. Students continue to build a metalanguage in French to describe patterns, grammatical rules and variations in language structures.

Students are encouraged to participate in intercultural interactions with members of the French-speaking community to discuss cultural practices, demonstrating awareness of the importance of shared understanding and reflecting on adjustments made as a result of reactions and responses.

In Year 8 students are supported to develop increasing autonomy as language learners and users, to
self-monitor and peer-monitor and to adjust language in response to their experiences in different contexts. French language is being used in more extended and elaborated ways for classroom interactions and routines, task participation and structured discussion.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate and maintain spoken and written interactions with peers and known adults using both rehearsed and spontaneous language to discuss and share ideas, views, opinions and experiences of special holidays and travel, for example, Où es-tu allé pendant les vacances ? Je suis resté(e) chez des amis de mes parents qui habitent à Paris; Etes-vous parti(e) en voyage cet été ? Je suis allé(e) à Margaret River, puis je suis parti(e) pour Albany; Que faites-vous pour célébrer le réveillon du Jour de l’An ? Eh bien, nous nous réunissons avec nos amis et la famille pour le dîner. Cette année, nous avons joué des jeux de cartes jusqu'à minuit avant de sortir sur le balcon pour regarder les feux d'artifice
(ACLFRC055)

Engage in tasks that involve planning experiences and activities such as a birthday party, Christmas or New Year’s Eve festivities, preparing for a real or virtual event, trip or excursion, a sporting event or community festival, considering options, negotiating arrangements, solving problems and participating in transactions that include purchasing goods and services
(ACLFRC056)

Informing

Access, summarise and share key ideas and information from a range of texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds and present them in different formats for the intended audience
(ACLFRC058)

Organise and present information and ideas to raise awareness of and inform others about texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, using descriptive and expressive language to compare perspectives and experiences
(ACLFRC059)

Creating

Respond to a range of imaginative texts, analysing ideas, themes, values and techniques used to engage and entertain audiences and make connections with personal experiences and other imaginative texts in own language and culture
(ACLFRC060)

Create and present a range of simple texts that involve imagined contexts and characters such as raps, poems, picture books or cartoons, selecting appropriate language, rhythms and images to enrich the visual or listening experience
(ACLFRC061)

Translating

Translate and/or interpret texts including those that use language with colloquial or cultural associations and consider why there might be differences in interpretation and how language reflects elements of culture
(ACLFRC062)

Reflecting

Participate in intercultural interactions with members of the French-speaking community to discuss cultural practices, demonstrating awareness of the importance of shared understanding and reflecting on adjustments made as a result of reactions and responses

(ACLFRC064)

Consider how their own biography influences their identity and communication and shapes their own intercultural experiences
(ACLFRC065)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise individual elements of spoken and written words, phrases and non-verbal forms of expression and notice how they combine to make or to change meaning
(ACLFRU066)

Continue to extend knowledge of context-related vocabulary and additional elements of grammar, including:

  • increasing control of the conjugation of regular verbs in le présent, le passé composé, l’imparfait and of high-frequency irregular verbs such as avoir, être, faire, devoir, vouloir, savoir, aller, for example, Je suis allée en France pour rendre visite à ma famille française
  • using le passé composé, recognising verbs conjugated with être as the auxiliary that involve agreement between subject and past participle, for example, Elles sont parties hier matin
  • understanding the form and function of reflexive verbs, for example, Il se lève très tard; Nous nous promenons chaque soir; Je veux m’asseoir à côté de toi
  • recognising and using idiomatic expressions such as those using avoir, for example, avoir soif, avoir sommeil, avoir peur
  • extending use of l’impératif and le futur proche
  • extending knowledge of negative constructions such as ne…plus, ne…rien, ne…jamais, ne…que
  • understanding how to use modal verb forms to express possibility, obligation and ability, for example, Je peux m’imaginer…; Il doit partir demain… and impersonal expressions such as il faut… and on…
  • learning to use direct object pronouns in conjunction with the present tense, for example, Je t’écoute, elle les mange tous les jours !

Continue to build a metalanguage to describe grammatical concepts and to organise learning resources
(ACLFRU067)

Apply the structures and conventions associated with a range of text types and identify key features and functions of the different genres
(ACLFRU068)

Language variation and change

Examine how elements of communication such as gestures, facial expressions and choice of language vary according to context and situation
(ACLFRU069)

Investigate the nature and extent of French language use in both Australian and global contexts
(ACLFRU071)

Role of language and culture

Reflect on different aspects of the cultural dimension of learning and using French and consider how this might be interpreted and responded to by members of the community
(ACLFRU072)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and maintain spoken and written interactions in French with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to exchange information on special holidays and travel. They use mainly rehearsed and some spontaneous descriptive and expressive language to discuss and share ideas, views, opinions and experiences, such as Que faites-vous pour célébrer le réveillon du Jour de l’An ? Cette année, nous avons joué des jeux de cartes jusqu'à minuit avant de sortir sur le balcon pour regarder les feux d'artifice. Students engage in the planning of experiences and activities by considering options, negotiating arrangements, solving problems and participating in transactions. They summarise and share most key ideas and some information from a range of texts and present them in different formats for their intended audiences. Students organise and present key information and ideas on texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, using mostly rehearsed descriptive and expressive language to make simple comparisons of perspectives and experiences. Students analyse key ideas, themes, values and techniques used to engage and entertain audiences in a range of imaginative texts, and make some connections with personal experiences and other imaginative texts in their own language and culture. They also create and present a range of simple texts with imagined contexts and characters, selecting mostly appropriate language, rhythms and images to enrich the visual or listening experience. Students translate and/or interpret texts, with some accuracy, including those that use language with colloquial or cultural associations, and consider why there might be differences in interpretation. Students participate in intercultural interactions with French speakers, begin to discuss cultural practices, demonstrate awareness of shared understanding and reflect on adjustments made as a result of reactions and responses. They also consider how their biography influences their identity and communication, and shapes their intercultural experiences.

Students better understand the systems of the French language, identifying individual elements of spoken and written words, phrases and non-verbal forms of expression, and noticing how they combine to make or change meaning within a given context. They use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in spoken and written texts, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students show increased control when using regular verbs in le présent and le passé composé, as well as high-frequency irregular verbs, such as avoir, être, faire and aller. When using le passé composé they recognise verbs conjugated with être, for example, Elles sont parties hier matin. Students extend their use of l’impératif and le futur proche, and recall the form and function of reflexive verbs, for example, Nous nous promenons chaque soir. Students recognise and use idiomatic expressions, such as those using avoir, for example, avoir soif and extend their knowledge of negative constructions, such ne…plus, ne…rien, ne…jamais, ne…que… They learn to use direct object pronouns in conjunction with le présent, for example, Je t’écoute, elle les mange tous les jours ! Students describe how the French language works, using metalanguage to organise learning resources. They apply most of the structures and conventions of a range of text types, and identify most key features and functions of the different genres. They examine and, at times, vary elements of communication, such as gestures, facial expressions and choice of language, according to context and situation. They discuss the nature and extent of French language use in both Australian and global contexts. Students discuss different cultural aspects of learning and using French, considering how this might be interpreted and responded to by members of the community.



Year 9 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 9 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the French language developed in Year 8 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of French language and culture.

Students communicate in French, initiating and participating in sustained interactions to share, compare and justify personal opinions about aspects of childhood, teenage life and relationships. They engage in shared activities such as planning and managing activities, events or experiences, exchanging resources and information. Students analyse ideas and information from a range of texts, identifying context, purpose and intended audience. They convey information and ideas and offer their own views on texts, using appropriate formats and styles of presentation. Students discuss how imaginative texts reflect French cultural values or experiences. They create and present imaginative texts designed to engage different audiences that involve moods and effects.

Students understand the systems of the French language, increasing control of regular and irregular elements of spoken and written French, using elements such as pitch, pace and gestures to maintain momentum, liaisons and accents. They increase control of context-related vocabulary and extend knowledge of grammatical elements such as understanding the function of verb tenses to situate events in time, when encountered in familiar expressions and scaffolded language contexts. Students further develop a metalanguage to discuss and explain grammatical forms and functions.

Students increasingly monitor language choices when using French, considering their own and others’ responses and reactions in intercultural communication, questioning assumptions and values and taking responsibility for modifying language and behaviours in relation to different cultural perspectives.

In Year 9 learning is characterised by consolidation and progression. Students are provided with new challenges and engage in some independent learning experiences, always supported by modelling, scaffolding and monitoring.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate and participate in sustained interactions, using informative and descriptive language to share, compare and justify personal opinions about aspects of childhood, teenage life and relationships, for example, Quand j’avais dix ans…; Maintenant…;
À l’ avenir…; C’est bien/dûr d’être ado car…; À mon avis…; À ton avis ?;Si tu me demandes...; Je ne suis pas d'accord du tout
(ACLFRC073)

Engage in shared activities such as planning and managing activities, events or experiences, exchanging resources and information, for example, plan a display or performance to illustrate their memories of aspects of their childhood or organise a forum to raise awareness of issues of interest to teenagers
(ACLFRC074)

Informing

Analyse ideas and information from a range of texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, identifying context, purpose and intended audience
(ACLFRC076)

Convey information and ideas and offer their own views on texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, using appropriate formats and styles of presentation
(ACLFRC077)

Creating

Discuss how imaginative texts reflect French cultural values or experiences through structure, language and mood, to build action, develop character and position the reader/audience
(ACLFRC078)

Create and present imaginative texts designed to engage different audiences that involve moods and effects, for example, les chants d’amours, les virelangues, les récits de guerre, le rap, le rock
(ACLFRC079)

Translating

Translate and interpret a range of texts and discuss how to convey concepts that do not translate easily across different linguistic and cultural contexts
(ACLFRC080)

Reflecting

Monitor language choices when using French, considering their own and others’ responses and reactions in intercultural communication, questioning assumptions and values and taking responsibility for modifying language and behaviours in relation to different cultural perspectives

(ACLFRC082)

Investigate and share family and cultural traditions and experiences, considering how these have shaped and continue to shape personal and cultural identity
(ACLFRC083)

Understanding

Systems of language

Increase control of regular and irregular elements of spoken and written French, using elements such as pitch, pace and gestures to maintain momentum, liaisons and accents
(ACLFRU084)

Increase control of context-related vocabulary and extend knowledge of grammatical elements, including:

  • understanding the function of verb tenses to situate events in time, for example, Ils vont partir demain matin; Je suis allée en France quand j’avais six ans and to express intention or desire, for example, Je voudrais bien aller à Tunis avec toi l’année prochaine !
  • recognising variations in conjugation for verbs such as nettoyer, envoyer, essayer, appeler, acheter, manger, for example, nous mangeons, j’essaie
  • consolidating the use of le passé composé, using verbs conjugated with être as the auxiliary that involve agreement between subject and past participle, for example, Elles sont parties hier matin
  • using l’imparfait to distinguish between a completed and a continuing action in the past, for example, Nous étions déjà au lit quand Papa a téléphoné
  • understanding the function of the reflexive pronoun and practising using the reflexive verb structure, for example, Je me suis levée à sept heures; Je me suis entraînée…
  • understanding the function and use of relative pronouns such as qui, que, dont

Further develop a metalanguage to discuss and explain grammatical forms and functions
(ACLFRU085)

Examine the interrelationship between different text types, language choices, audience, context and purpose
(ACLFRU086)

Language variation and change

Analyse how and why language is used differently in different contexts and relationships
(ACLFRU087)

Explore changes to both French and Australian English and identify reasons for these changes such as media and new technologies, popular culture and intercultural exchange
(ACLFRU088) (ACLFRU089)

Role of language and culture

Explore how language both reflects and shapes cultural distinctions such as community, social class, gender and generation
(ACLFRU090)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate, in part, and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in French with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to exchange information on aspects of childhood, teenage life and relationships. They use familiar descriptive and expressive language to share, compare and justify personal opinions, such as À l’avenir… and C’est bien/dûr d’être ado car…Students engage in shared activities, such as the planning and managing of activities, events or experiences, exchanging resources and information. They analyse ideas and most information and, in part, identify context, purpose and intended audience from a range of texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds. Students use some appropriate formats and styles of presentation to convey information and ideas, and offer their views on texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds. Students provide examples of how imaginative texts reflect French cultural values or experiences, through structure, language and mood, to build action, develop character and position the reader or audience. They also create and present simple imaginative texts with moods and effects, in order to engage different audiences. Students translate and interpret, with some accuracy, a range of texts, and discuss how to convey concepts that do not translate easily across different linguistic and cultural contexts. They monitor their language choices when using French and consider, at times, their own and others’ responses and reactions in intercultural communication. Students question some assumptions and values, and occasionally, modify their language and behaviours in relation to different cultural perspectives. They also investigate and share family and cultural traditions and experiences, considering how these have shaped, and continue to shape, personal and cultural identity.

Students better understand the systems of the French language, applying regular and irregular elements of spoken and written French, such as pitch, pace and gestures to maintain momentum, liaisons and accents. They use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in spoken and written texts, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students show increased control when using le présent, le passé composé, l’imparfait and le futur proche, as well as identifying tenses to use when situating events in time, for example, Je suis allée en France quand j’avais six ans, and to express intention or desire, for example, Je voudrais bien aller à Tunis avec toi l’année prochaine ! They identify variations in conjugation for verbs, such as envoyer, appeler and manger. Students describe the function of the reflexive pronoun and practise using the reflexive verb structure, for example, Je me suis levée à sept heures. They identify the function and use of relative pronouns, such as qui, que and dont. Students use metalanguage to discuss and to explain some grammatical forms and functions. They examine the interrelationship between different text types, language choices, audience, context and purpose. Students analyse how and why language is used differently in different contexts and with different speakers, and explore changes to both French and Australian English, identifying some reasons for these changes. Students explore how language reflects and shapes cultural distinctions, such as community, social class, gender and generation.



Year 10 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 10 French: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the French language developed in Year 9 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of French language and culture. Students require continued guidance and mentoring at this stage of their language learning, but work increasingly independently to analyse, reflect on and monitor their language learning and intercultural experiences. They are considering future pathways and prospects, including how the French language may feature in these.

Students communicate in French, initiating and participating in sustained interactions in formal and informal exchanges to discuss young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues. They contribute ideas, opinions and suggestions in interactions related to shared activities, solving problems and managing diverse views. Students analyse, synthesise and evaluate ideas and information from a range of perspectives on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. They convey information, comments and experiences on texts, using different modes of presentation to achieve different purposes. Students analyse how imaginative texts create effects in ways that reflect cultural influence. They create and present a range of imaginative texts on themes of personal or social relevance.

Students understand the systems of the French language, increasing control of regular and irregular elements of spoken and written French, using non-verbal elements, liaisons, accents and expression to engage interest. They increase control of context-related vocabulary and extend knowledge of grammatical elements such as noticing how grammatical choices can shade meaning, determine perspective and establish relationship, when encountered in expressions and scaffolded language contexts. Students further develop a metalanguage to discuss and explain grammatical forms and functions.

Students understand that French language and culture are interrelated and that they shape and are shaped by each other in a given moment and over time.

In Year 10 students are challenged with more independent learning experiences, however, these experiences continue to be supported with scaffolding and monitoring.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate and participate in sustained interactions, using descriptive and expressive language in formal and informal exchanges to discuss young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues, for example, la santé des jeunes, apprendre les langues, les responsabilités maintenant et dans le futur

Express feelings and justify opinions, for example, C’est comment pour toi ?; C’est difficile pour vous d’apprendre le français ? Moi, je trouve que…; Que peut-on faire pour maintenir la santé de la terre ?; Qu’est-ce que vous étudierez l’année prochaine et pourquoi ?
(ACLFRC073)

Contribute ideas, opinions and suggestions in interactions related to shared activities such as organising real or simulated forums, social media or daily news segments, protests or rallies to raise awareness of contemporary culture and social issues, exchanging resources and information, solving problems and managing diverse views
(ACLFRC074)

Informing

Analyse, synthesise and evaluate ideas and information from a range of perspectives on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds such as regional news headlines and local community announcements and advertisements and identify how context and culture affect how information is presented
(ACLFRC076)

Convey information, comments, perspectives and experiences on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds, using different modes of presentation to suit different audiences or to achieve different purposes
(ACLFRC077)

Creating

Analyse how imaginative texts create aesthetic, humorous or emotional effects in ways that reflect cultural influence such as poems, songs, dance, street art and performance
(ACLFRC078)

Create and present a range of imaginative texts on themes of personal or social relevance, to express ideas or that reflect cultural values, social issues or experience
(ACLFRC079)

Translating

Consider the nature of translating and interpreting, explaining how cultural perspectives and concepts have been represented when transferring meaning from one language to another, for example, how popular French expressions and idioms such as Être bien dans sa peau; Dans son assiette; Avoir le cafard; Revenons à nos moutons, can create confusion when translated literally
(ACLFRC080)

Reflecting

Reflect on the experience of learning and using French, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility for contributing to mutual understanding, by modifying language and behaviours in relation to cultural perspectives

(ACLFRC082)

Explore and express own cultural identity and ability to act as a cultural mediator between French speakers and Australians
(ACLFRC083)

Understanding

Systems of language

Increase control of regular and irregular elements of spoken and written French, using non-verbal elements, liaisons, accents and expression to engage interest
(ACLFRU084)

Increase control of context-related vocabulary and analyse how grammatical elements impact on the making of meaning in texts, including:

  • noticing how grammatical choices can shade meaning, determine perspective and establish relationship, for example, an imperative verb mood can indicate authority or enthusiasm such as Arrêtez !; Allons-y !; Donnez-moi votre billet, Mademoiselle; shifting from the use of vous to tu can signal a more informal, friendly relationship
  • exploring how choices of words such as nouns and adjectives can indicate values and attitudes, for example, C’est un bon à rien/C’est un brave jeune homme; Ce sont des illégaux/Ce sont des réfugiés
  • using le présent, l’impératif, le futur proche, le passé composé and l’imparfait
  • understanding and using in simple constructions le futur and le conditionnel
  • understanding that past participles agree with the preceding direct object when the verb is conjugated with the auxiliary verb avoir, for example, J’ai acheté une tartelette aux
    fraises — je l’ai mangée trop vite !
  • understanding and using infinitive verb forms and phrasal verbs such as avoir besoin de faire quelque chose; commencer à faire…
  • using relative, emphatic and direct/indirect object pronouns, for example, qui, que, elle, eux, lui, leur, le, la, les

Further develop a metalanguage to discuss and explain grammatical forms and functions
(ACLFRU085)

Analyse how different types of text incorporate cultural and contextual elements
(ACLFRU086)

Language variation and change

Analyse and explain how and why language is used differently in a range of texts, considering features such as dialects and register
(ACLFRU087)

Explain how French language and culture have evolved and how they continue to change over time and understand that language use has the power to influence social and cultural relationships and practices
(ACLFRU088) (ACLFRU089)

Role of language and culture

Understand that French language and culture are interrelated and that they shape and are shaped by each other in a given moment and over time
(ACLFRU090)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in French with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to provide information on young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues, such as la santé des jeunes, apprendre les langues, les responsabilités maintenant et dans le futur. They use familiar descriptive and expressive language, in formal and some informal exchanges, to express feelings and justify opinions, with some examples. Students contribute ideas, opinions and suggestions in interactions related to exchanging resources and information, solving problems and managing diverse views. Students analyse, synthesise and evaluate some ideas and information from a range of perspectives on texts, and identify how context and culture affect how information is presented in texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. They use modes of presentation, generally appropriate to audiences or purposes, to convey information, comments, perspectives and experiences on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. Students explain how aesthetic, humorous or emotional effects are used in imaginative texts to reflect cultural influence, and create and present simple imaginative texts on familiar personal or social themes that express ideas or that reflect cultural values, social issues or experience. When translating and interpreting from one language to another they describe how cultural perspectives and concepts have been represented. They describe the experience of learning and using French, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility by modifying language and behaviours. They also explore and express their own cultural identity and ability to act as a cultural mediator between French speakers and Australians.

Students better understand the systems of the French language, applying, with some inaccuracies, regular and irregular elements of spoken and written French, using non-verbal elements, liaisons, accents and expression to engage interest. Students use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in spoken and written texts, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students analyse how elements of grammar impact on the making of meaning in texts, including identifying how grammatical choices can shade meaning, determine perspective and establish relationship, for example, shifting from the use of vous to tu can signal a more informal, friendly relationship. They explore how choices of words, such as nouns and adjectives can indicate values and attitudes, for example, C’est un brave jeune homme and Ce sont des réfugiés. Students use le présent, l’impératif, le futur proche, le passé composé and l’imparfait, and use le futur and le conditionnel in simple constructions. Students identify that past participles agree with the preceding direct object when the verb is conjugated with the auxiliary verb avoir, for example, J’ai acheté une tartelette aux fraises — je l’ai mangée trop vite ! They use infinitive verb forms and phrasal verbs, such as avoir besoin de faire quelque chose, and relative, emphatic and direct/indirect object pronouns. Students use metalanguage to discuss and explain some grammatical forms and functions. They analyse how different types of text include cultural and contextual elements, and explain how and why language is used differently in a range of texts. They explain how French language and culture have evolved, and how they continue to change over time, and identify how language use has the power to influence social and cultural relationships and practices. Students describe how French language and culture are interrelated and how they shape, and are shaped by, each other.



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