Japanese: Second Language

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Japanese: Second Language

Pre-primary year syllabus

Year Level Description

Students enter the early years of school with established communication skills in one or more languages and varying degrees of early literacy capability. Typically, students come to Japanese: Second Language with little to no prior experience of the Japanese language and culture.

In Pre-primary students communicate in Japanese, exchanging greetings and simple information about themselves with their teacher and peers, through action-related talk and structured play. They participate in group activities by performing short songs, rhymes, chants or stories in Japanese facilitated by movement and gestures. Students respond to teacher talk and instruction in Japanese.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, beginning to recognise simple pictographic kanji and recreating these using kinaesthetic activities. They begin to notice that Japanese has different sounds and words to English and any other languages they may have been exposed to.

In Pre-primary students recognise that while English is the official language spoken in Australia, Japanese is one of many languages, including Aboriginal languages and Torres Strait Islander languages, which is spoken in Australia. They also notice similarities and differences between Japanese and English and begin to develop curiosity around the ideas of language and culture. Creative play in the classroom provides opportunities for exploring these differences.

Students learn Japanese in the early years through rich language input. Regular opportunities to revisit, recycle and review, and continuous feedback, response and encouragement assist students in the language learning process.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact with the teacher and peers through
action-related talk and structured play, to exchange greetings such as おはよう、さようなら、
じゃあね

Introduce and share information about themselves, for example, name です; 五さい です
(ACLJAC109)

Respond to praise, support and respect for others using formulaic expressions modelled by the teacher, for example,

だいじょうぶ?; たいへん?;すごい!;
よくできました;ありがとうございます;
ありがとう

(ACLJAC127)

Participate in shared action with the teacher and peers using simple, repetitive key words, images, gestures, movement and songs, for example,

むすんでひらいて、ひげじいさん、
しあわせならてをたたこう

(ACLJAC110)

Respond to teacher talk and instruction, for example,

たってください;うたいましょう

(ACLJAC111)

Informing

Recognise symbols, key words and phrases of spoken and written Japanese in rhymes, songs, labels, titles and captions in their environment and related to their personal worlds, for example,
男の子、女の子、トイレ
(ACLJAC112)

Convey factual information about their personal worlds, using pictures, labels, captions, songs, rhymes, gestures and familiar words, for example,

あか、おおきい
(ACLJAC113)

Creating

Engage by listening to and viewing a range of short, imaginative texts and respond through action, dance, singing, drawing, movement and other forms of expression, for example,

あたまかたひざポン、こぶたたぬききつね、
キャベツの中から

Make simple statements about favourite characters in stories or songs, for example,

やさしい、 かわいい、こわい、つよい
(ACLJAC114)

Participate in the shared performance of songs or rhymes, playing with sound patterns, verbal and non-verbal forms of expression
(ACLJAC115)

Translating

Share with others the meaning of simple expressions related to their day, for example,

どうぞ;おはようございます;いただきます;ありがとう

(ACLJAC116)

Reflecting

Begin noticing how Japanese feels/sounds different when speaking, singing a song or hearing it spoken by others compared with using and hearing their own language(s)
(ACLJAC119)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise and experiment with reproducing sounds and rhythms of spoken Japanese by singing, reciting and repeating words and phrases in context
(ACLJAU120)

Recognise that the Japanese language uses three different scripts, depending on word origin and the context of language use

Notice that Japanese can be written vertically or horizontally

Recognise simple kanji, using early language strategies, for example, making play dough kanji characters over a template
(ACLJAU121)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary to generate language

Recognise some first elements of grammar, including:

  • knowing common forms of greetings and noticing the different levels of formality, for example, おはようございます/おはよう
  • understanding different question words such as だれ/なに/どこ and the sentence-ending particle か
  • understanding that Japanese uses name + suffix instead of pronouns when referring to other people, for example, Johnくん/はなこさん/
    Grant せんせい
  • building vocabulary to describe and label familiar and immediate objects and environments
    (ACLJAU122)

Recognise that language is organised as ‘text’ that can be spoken, written, digital, visual or multimodal
(ACLJAU123)

Language variation and change

Recognise that in Japanese, as in English and other languages, there are different ways of greeting, addressing and interacting with people and that greetings vary according to the time of day or the occasion, for example,
おはよう、こんにちは、こんばんは
(ACLJAU124)

Role of language and culture

Recognise that Japanese is one of many languages spoken in Australia including Aboriginal languages and Torres Strait Islander languages, Asian languages and world languages
(ACLJAU125)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact in Japanese with their teacher and each other through action-related talk, structured play, classroom instructions and routines to exchange simple greetings and to provide information about themselves, such as おはよう、さようなら、nameです. They respond to praise, support and show respect for others using modelled formulaic expressions or English. Students participate in shared performance of well-rehearsed stories and songs and make meaning using verbal and non-verbal forms of expression. They identify most keywords and some phrases of spoken Japanese relating to their personal worlds and convey most simple, factual information with guidance, using verbal and non-verbal forms of expression. They participate in shared performance of imaginative texts, such as familiar songs and rhymes, and respond with guidance, using verbal and non-verbal forms of expression. Students share the meaning of simple expressions related to their day, such as arigatou, ohayou gozaimasu and sayounara. They begin to talk about how Japanese feels/sounds different when speaking, singing a song or hearing it spoken by others compared with their own language(s).

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, experimenting with reproducing the sounds and rhythms of spoken Japanese with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They recognise that the Japanese language uses three different scripts, depending on word origin and the context of language use and that the different scripts that can be written vertically or horizontally. They recognise and use words and expressions and simple kanji, such as in pictures, labels, songs, rhymes and familiar words, and some first elements of grammar with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students begin to use common forms of greetings and show awareness of the different levels of formality, such as おはようございます/ おはよう. They use different question words and the sentence-ending particle か. They identify that Japanese uses name + suffix instead of pronouns when referring to other people. Students begin to build vocabulary to describe and label familiar and immediate objects and environments. They comment on how language is organised as ‘text.’ They identify the different ways of greeting, addressing and interacting with people, and usually act accordingly. Students recognise Japanese as one of many languages spoken in Australia and around the world and begin to develop curiosity around the ideas of language and culture.



Year 1 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 1 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required by students to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Pre-primary and focuses on extending their oral communication skills. Typically, the students’ only exposure to and experience of the Japanese language and culture is from their school learning environment.

Students communicate in Japanese, interacting with the teacher and peers in Japanese to share information about themselves and to talk about their favourite things. They participate in guided group activities, using simple and repetitive language in songs, rhymes and games. They respond to teacher talk and instruction in Japanese and use formulaic expressions to express support and respect for others during class activities. Students locate key words and simple kanji or hiragana in texts such as charts, lists, rhymes and songs that relate to their personal worlds. They engage with the shared reading and viewing of Japanese texts and use simple language to describe and respond to the characters in these texts. They participate in shared performance of short imaginative texts re-enacting and retelling stories in Japanese using modelled language.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, beginning to recognise the sequence of hiragana from a to n and to trace some hiragana characters. They build on their understanding of stroke order and that individual kanji represent meaning as well as sounds.

In Year 1 students start to explore Japanese words that are used in English and notice how their behaviour and body language may change when they are speaking in Japanese.

Students learn Japanese in the early years through rich language input. Regular opportunities to revisit, recycle and review, and continuous feedback, response and encouragement assist students in the language learning process.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact with the teacher and peers, using simple modelled language and gestures, to share information about themselves and to talk about their favourite things, for example,

ちいさい 目 です;ねずみ です;ちいさい です;かわいい です;はいいろ です;すいか です;おいしい です; いちご が すきです;

へび が すきじゃないです
(ACLJAC109)

Express praise, support and respect for others, using formulaic expressions such as おめでとう
がんばって、じょうず

(ACLJAC127)

Participate in guided group activities, using simple repetitive language in songs, rhymes, games such as じゃんけんぽん, transactions, gestures and pictures, to support understanding and to convey meaning
(ACLJAC110)

Respond to teacher talk and instruction, for example,

はい、います;Tiaさん は、いません;
おやすみ です;おくれて すみません
(ACLJAC111)

Informing

Locate key words, simple kanji or hiragana and information in simple spoken and written texts such as charts, lists, anime, rhymes and songs related to their personal worlds
(ACLJAC112)

Convey factual information about their personal worlds using pictures, labels, captions, familiar words and simple statements, for example,
ぼく の えんぴつ です;いぬ が すき です
(ACLJAC113)

Creating

Participate in listening to and viewing a range of short, imaginative texts and respond through action, dance, singing, drawing, collaborative retelling and responding to prompt questions, for example,

だれ ですか;ちいさい ですか;おおきい  ですか;かわいい ですか

Use simple language structures and supporting drawings or actions to describe and respond to imaginary characters or experiences, for example, おに は こわい!;いっすんぼうし は ちいさい です;ももたろう は つよい  です
(ACLJAC114)

Re-enact or retell simple stories or interactions with puppets, props, actions or gestures, using modelled language, for example,

おむすびころりん
(ACLJAC115)

Translating

Identify key words in children’s stories or songs and provide English translations or explanations of meaning, for example,
むかしむかし;おわり

Find examples of Japanese words used in English and explain what they mean, for example, sushi, karate, origami
(ACLJAC116)

Reflecting

Notice ways of talking in Japanese that appear different to their own ways and notice how voice, behaviour and body language may change when speaking Japanese
(ACLJAC119)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise and reproduce the sounds and rhythms of spoken Japanese

Learn how sounds are produced and represented in the three different scripts
(ACLJAU120)

Recognise, trace and copy some hiragana

Recognise that kanji and hiragana have stroke order, for example, using tai chi to demonstrate stroke order

Understand that each individual kanji represents meaning as well as sounds, for example,
月 Moon, 一月 January

Recognise sequence of hiragana あ to ん, for example, through singing a hiragana rap song
(ACLJAU121)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary and some first elements of grammar to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • understanding basic word order in simple sentences, for example, noun が すき です;りんご が すき です;adjective + nounです;おおきい   いぬ です
  • referring to numbers of things using cardinal numbers 0–10, for example、二、三
  • recognising that numbers 4, 7 and 9 have more than one reading
  • learning to describe the colour, size and shape of things, for example, みどり です;おおきい です;まる/しかく/ほし です
  • recognising and responding to a request using verb ください, for example, すわってください

(ACLJAU122)

Understand that language is organised as ‘text’ and that different types of texts have different features
(ACLJAU123)

Language variation and change

Understand that in Japanese, as in English and other languages, there are different ways of greeting, addressing and interacting with people, and that particular interactions can vary between cultural contexts, for example, the use of titles in Japanese ~さん/~せんせい compared with the informal use of names in Australian English
(ACLJAU124)

Role of language and culture

Recognise that Australia is a multilingual society with speakers of many different languages, including Japanese, and that Japanese and English borrow words and expressions from each other and from other languages, for example, sushi, origami, anime and manga
(ACLJAU125)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact in Japanese with their teacher and each other through shared performance, guided group activities, classroom instructions and routines to provide information about themselves and to talk about their favourite things. They use simple modelled language, gestures and other forms of expression, with occasional guidance, to ask questions and make statements, such as いちご が すきです. They express praise and support and show respect for others, using some modelled expressions. Students locate most key words, simple kanji and hiragana in texts and convey some factual information about their personal worlds using verbal and non-verbal forms of expression. They respond to a range of short imaginative texts and participate in the shared performance and presentation of short texts using familiar verbal and non-verbal forms of expression and well-rehearsed modelled language. When translating, they use Japanese and/or English to share with others meanings of key words in Japanese stories and songs. Students talk about how voice, behaviour and body language may change when speaking Japanese.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, recognising and reproducing the sounds and rhythms of spoken Japanese with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They show some awareness of how sounds are produced and represented in the three different scripts. Students use words and expressions, trace and copy some hiragana and kanji to convey factual information at word and simple sentence level, and use some first elements of grammar with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students begin to use basic word order in simple sentences, such as りんご が すき です, adjectives to describe the colour, size and shape of things, and experiment with responding to requests using verb ください, such as すわって くださ. Students develop number knowledge for numbers 0–10 and recognise that 4, 7 and 9 have more than one reading. They make some comments about how language is organised as ‘text’ and that different types of texts have different features. They recognise that in Japanese there are different ways of greeting, addressing and interacting with people. Students recognise that Japanese is one of the many languages spoken in Australia and identify some words and expressions that Japanese and English borrow from each other.



Year 2 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 2 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Year 1 and focuses on extending the oral communication skills of students.

Students communicate in Japanese, interacting with the teacher and peers, using simple language and gestures, to talk about friends and family members. They use repetitive and formulaic language to participate in guided group activities, simple tasks and transactions. Students identify key points of information in simple spoken, written or digital texts to complete guided tasks. They respond to Japanese versions of stories they are familiar with or Japanese folktales and compare and contrast these with texts they are familiar with. Students create or re-create simple imaginative texts such as Japanese songs, poems or rhymes.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, beginning to recognise and copy the 46 basic hiragana characters using supports such as mnemonics and by playing games to reinforce learning. Students are also exposed to a few high-frequency kanji when they relate to the learning context.

In Year 2 students recognise that all languages, including Japanese, continuously change over time through contact with each other and through changes in society. They explore Japanese expressions that do not readily translate into English and Japanese cultural practices that are not commonly used by English speakers.

Students learn Japanese in the early years through rich language input. At this stage, play and imaginative activities, music, movement and familiar routines, opportunities to revisit, recycle and review, and continuous feedback, provide the essential scaffolding to assist students in the language learning process.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact with the teacher and peers, using simple formulaic structures, expressions and gestures to talk about friends and family members, for example, かぞく は 六人 です。おとうさん と
おかあさん と おねえさん と ぼく と いもうと と あかちゃん です。いもうと  は 五さい  です。おかあさん は
やさしい です。おとうさん は くるま が すきです。
(ACLJAC109)

Participate in guided group activities, simple tasks, transactions and games, using simple, repetitive language
(ACLJAC110)

Respond to teacher talk and instruction, for example, たって/すわって/かいて/みて/よんで/きいてください
(ACLJAC111)

Informing

Identify specific points of information from familiar types of simple spoken, written or digital texts to complete guided tasks related to their personal worlds
(ACLJAC112)

Convey factual information about their personal worlds using simple statements, modelled language and support materials
(ACLJAC113)

Creating

Respond to Japanese versions of familiar children’s stories and Japanese folk tales, comparing expressions at key points in the stories with
English-language versions or other known stories, and re-enacting with puppets, props or actions, for example, おおきなかぶ、ももたろう
(ACLJAC114)

Create or recreate simple songs, poems and rhymes using familiar words and modelled language utilising non-verbal forms of support, such as clapping, gestures and facial expressions
(ACLJAC115)

Translating

Identify Japanese expressions that do not translate readily into English, for example,

おべんとう、せんせい、~さん/くん

Identify Japanese cultural practices that are not commonly used by English speakers, for example, using two hands for giving and receiving and まる/ばつ (○×)
(ACLJAC116)

Reflecting

Recognise similarities and differences between aspects of Japanese and Australian cultural practices and related language use
(ACLJAC119)

Understanding

Systems of language

Reproduce sounds, rhythms and intonation patterns of spoken Japanese

Produce and represent basic units of sound in the three different scripts
(ACLJAU120)

Recognise and copy the 46 basic hiragana, using support such as mnemonic clues

Identify known hiragana within a word and use that to predict the meaning

Recognise and copy a few high-frequency kanji andkana such as numbers and pictographs (basic, high frequency kanji where the picture reflects the meaning) such as 山、川、口、目、上
(ACLJAU121)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary and understand some first elements of grammar to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • indicating affirmative and negative responses using はい/ いいえ;ちがいます
  • using some culturally specific parallel phrases related to giving and receiving, for example,
    どうぞ;ありがとう
  • learning to use common onomatopoeia such as ぺこぺこ、わんわん
  • beginning to use counters in Japanese, for example, ~人、~さい、
  • understanding how to specify items using the possessive particle の, for example, わたし  の  かぞく;おばあさん  の いえ
  • describing people, animals, places and things using adjective–noun phrases, for example, 大きい 目;おいしい もも

(ACLJAU122)

Understand that language is organised as ‘text’ that takes different forms and uses different structures and features to achieve its purpose
(ACLJAU123)

Language variation and change

Understand that Japanese speakers use language differently in different situations and according to cultural norms, such as when at home with the family or in the classroom, for example,
おはよう/おはようございます;

いってらっしゃい;いってきます;ただいま;

おかえり;なに?/なんですか
(ACLJAU124)

Role of language and culture

Recognise that all languages, including Japanese, change continuously through contact with each other and through changes in society
(ACLJAU125)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact in Japanese with their teacher and each other through routine exchanges, guided group activities, instructions and transactions to talk about friends and family members, such as かぞく は 六人 です。 They use simple formulaic structures, expressions and gestures, to make statements such as おとうさん は くるま が すきです。 Students identify some specific points of information in simple texts to mostly complete guided tasks and they make use of simple statements, modelled language and support materials to convey factual information about their personal worlds. They listen to, view and read Japanese versions of familiar children’s stories and Japanese folk tales, comparing some expressions with English language. They create or recreate simple songs, poems and rhymes using gestures, familiar words and modelled language with guidance. They identify for others some Japanese expressions that do not translate readily into English and cultural practices that are not commonly used by English speakers. Students identify some of the similarities and differences between some aspects of Japanese and Australian cultural practices and use of language.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, reproducing the sounds, rhythms, and intonation patterns of spoken language with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They recognise and copy with a satisfactory level of accuracy, the 46 hiragana and a few high-frequency kanji with support, and identify known hiragana within words to predict meaning. They use words and expressions and some first elements of grammar with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students indicate affirmative and negative responses using はい/ いいえ;ちがいます and use some culturally specific parallel phrases related to giving and receiving. They learn to use common onomatopoeia such as ぺこぺこ、わんわん and begin to use counters in Japanese. Students specify items using the possessive particle の, such as わたし  の  かぞく. They describe people, animals, places and things using adjective-noun phrases.They identify some different forms of texts that use different structures and features to achieve their purpose. They identify some ways Japanese speakers use language differently in different situations and according to cultural norms. Students identify some ways that the Japanese language has changed over time through contact with other languages and changes in society.



Year 3 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 3 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Year 2 and focuses on extending the oral and written communication skills of students. They benefit from varied, activity-based learning that builds on their interests and capabilities and makes connections with other areas of learning.

Students communicate in Japanese, interacting with their teacher and peers to participate in routine exchanges such as asking each other how they are and by talking about activities they participate in during their day, and events that occur through the year. They participate in class experiences and everyday transactions that involve following instructions, asking questions and making statements. Students are exposed to imaginative texts such as kamishibai (paper puppets) and respond by acting out events or identifying and comparing favourite characters and elements. They create, perform and present short imaginative texts that use familiar expressions and modelled language.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, building their vocabulary repertoire and beginning to generate new language using verbs in the ます and negative ません form. A hiragana chart is used by students to support them as they begin to read and write words in hiragana. Students begin to develop a metalanguage in Japanese for talking about language, using terms similar to those used in English.

Students are encouraged to describe their Japanese learning experiences and explore their own sense of identity and ways that they use language differently when they interact with different people. They begin to model and explain culture specific practices such as bowing when greeting and demonstrating hand gestures and body language that are used alongside Japanese communication.

In Year 3 students require extensive support with their language learning. Tasks are carefully scaffolded, models and examples are provided along with support for self-monitoring and reflection. Students are encouraged to use Japanese as much as possible for classroom routines, social interactions and for learning tasks.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact with the teacher and peers, using formulaic structures and expressions, to participate in routine exchanges such asasking each other how they are, offering wishes and talking about events in the day and over the year, for example,
土よう日 に ともだち と うみ に いきます;たん生日 に ケーキ を たべます/たべません
(ACLJAC127)

Participate in class experiences, activities and everyday transactions that involve following instructions, asking questions and making statements
(ACLJAC128)

Informing

Locate specific points of information in a range of written, spoken, multimodal and digital texts, related to their personal worlds
(ACLJAC130)

Convey factual information about their personal worlds in simple statements, short descriptions and modelled texts using graphic and digital support
(ACLJAC131)

Creating

Participate in and respond to imaginative texts, acting out events, identifying and comparing favourite elements and making simple statements about characters or themes
(ACLJAC132)

Create and perform short, imaginative texts that use familiar expressions and modelled language, as well as simple visual supports, for example,

すきな たべもの は なん ですか;
なんさい ですか
(ACLJAC133)

Translating

Explain and model culture-specific practices and formulaic language, such as apologising for being late by waiting at the entrance/door, bowing and using the expression おくれて すみません。
しつれいします

Demonstrate and explain hand gestures, body language or facial expressions that work with language or stand alone in Japanese communication, such as beckoning with fingers pointing downwards, or waving a hand in front of the face to signal a negative response
(ACLJAC134)

Reflecting

Notice what looks or feels similar or different to their own language(s) and culture when interacting in Japanese
(ACLJAC137)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise that there are 19 distinct consonants
(k, g, s, sh, z, j, t, ch, ts, d, n, h, f, b, p, m, y, r, w) and five vowels (a, i, u, e, o)

Understand the system of basic Japanese sound combinations, that a vowel can be attached to most consonants to produce a hiragana character
(ACLJAU138)

Use a hiragana chart as a framework for reading and writing

Commence basic hiragana script writing

Begin to read and write words using hiragana
(ACLJAU139)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • using verbs in ます and negative form ません
  • describing actions using verb ます form, for example, すし を たべます
  • understanding the rules of Japanese word order (subject + object + verb), the use of associated particles は/を/と/も/に, and the use of が in formulaic expressions, for example, noun がすきです
  • understanding time words associated with days of the week, months of the year and seasons
  • beginning to use general counters in Japanese, for example, ひとつ、ふたつ
  • seeking information using question words なに/なん/いつ/どこ/ だれ and the sentence-ending particle か, for example, なに が すき ですか;なんさい ですか

Begin to develop a metalanguage in Japanese for talking about language, using terms similar to those used in English
(ACLJAU140)

Recognise the particular language features and textual conventions in simple, familiar, spoken, written and multimodal Japanese texts
(ACLJAU141)

Language variation and change

Understand that different ways of using Japanese language reflect different regions, different relationships and different ways of making meaning
(ACLJAU142)

Role of language and culture

Understand that Japanese is the official language of Japan and one of the major languages of the
Asia-Pacific region, a world language and an Australian community language
(ACLJAU143)

Notice differences between Japanese, Australian and other cultures’ practices and how these are reflected in language
(ACLJAU144)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact in Japanese with their teacher and each other through class experiences, activities and everyday transactions, and in routine exchanges to ask each other how they are, offer wishes and talk about events in the day and over the year, such as 土よう日 に ともだち と うみ に いきます. They use simple descriptive and expressive modelled language and gestures to follow instructions, ask questions and make statements. They locate some specific points of information in a range of short texts and convey factual information about their personal worlds using familiar words, simple statements and modelled texts. Students participate in and respond to a range of imaginative texts, acting out events, identifying and comparing favourite elements and making simple statements about characters or theme. They create and perform short imaginative texts that use familiar expressions, modelled language and simple visual supports. Students explain and demonstrate some culture-specific practices, modelled language, verbal and non-verbal forms of expression that work with language, or stand alone in Japanese communication. When interacting in Japanese, students identify similarities or differences to their own language and culture.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, recognising that there are 19 distinct consonants and mostly understanding the system of basic Japanese sound combinations; that a vowel can be attached to most consonants to produce a hiragana character. Students use a hiragana chart to read and write basic hiragana with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use vocabulary and expressions and apply elements of grammar in simple spoken and written texts with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use verbs in ます and negative form ません and describe actions using verb ます form. Students identify the rules of Japanese word order (subject + object + verb), the use of associated particles は/を/と/も/に, and the use of が in formulaic expressions. They begin to use time words associated with days of the week, months of the year and seasons and begin using general counters in Japanese. Students seek information using question words なに/なん/いつ/どこ/ だれ and the sentence-ending particle か.Students begin to describe, with guidance, how the Japanese language works, using terms similar to those used in English. They apply some of the language features and textual conventions in simple, familiar texts. Students describe how different ways of using Japanese language reflect different regions and countries, different relationships and different ways of making meaning. They state that Japanese is the official language of Japan, and an Australian community language. Students identify the differences between Japanese Australian and other cultures’ practices and how these are reflected in language.



Year 4 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 4 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Year 3 and focuses on extending the oral and written communication skills of students.

Students communicate in Japanese, interacting and socialising with the teacher and peers to exchange information about aspects of their personal world, including their daily routines at home and school, and their interests. They participate in collaborative class activities and transactions that involve solving problems and sharing decisions. Students engage with a range of Japanese imaginative texts and identify key language and cultural behaviours in them. They create, perform and present imaginative texts for different audiences that allow for the exploration and enjoyment of language.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, continuing to learn context-related vocabulary and generating new language for a range of purposeful interactions such as using time expressions and using verbs in the past such as the ました and ませんでした form. They read and write words in hiragana and high frequency kanji with support and scaffolding. Students are supported to reflect on Japanese language protocols that relate to their personal worlds. They begin to develop a metalanguage in Japanese for talking about language, using terms similar to those used in English.

In Year 4 students continue to require extensive support with their language learning. Purposeful communicative activities and experiences are planned, models and examples are provided, along with support for self-monitoring and reflection. Language experience and input include authentic texts that may require some modification to ensure familiar vocabulary and simple sentence structures. Students continue to be encouraged to use Japanese as much as possible for social interactions and in learning tasks.

Communicating

Socialising

Interact and socialise with the teacher and peers, using simple descriptive or expressive modelled language, to exchange information about aspects of their personal worlds, including their daily routines at home and school and their interests, for example, サッカー を しますか。いつ しますか。
土よう日 に サッカー を します。
サッカー  が  すき ですか。ぼく も
すき です。

Recount past activities, for example,
まち に いきました
(ACLJAC127)

Contribute collaboratively to class experiences, activities and transactions that involve asking for help, clarification and permission, solving a problem and sharing decisions, such as creating a display or conducting a role play or scenario, science experiments, cooking, origami or other craft activities
(ACLJAC128)

Informing

Locate and process factual information from familiar types of written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts, related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLJAC130)

Gather and convey factual information, simple statements and short descriptions from familiar texts related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLJAC131)

Creating

View a range of imaginative texts, for example, Japanese television programs for children and identify key words, familiar phrases and cultural expressions and behaviours
(ACLJAC132)

Create and perform short, imaginative texts that allow for exploration and enjoyment of language, cultural expression and performance, using familiar expressions, simple statements and modelled language, for example, くち が 大きい です。にく を たべます。かわ に すんでいます。とても こわい です。
(ACLJAC133)

Translating

Explain features of Japanese language protocols such as the use of formulaic expressions, for example, いってきます/ただいま; counter classifiers; the indication of politeness by using です

Use visual, print or online dictionaries, word lists and pictures to translate simple familiar texts such as labels or captions
(ACLJAC134)

Reflecting

Notice and describe how language reflects cultural practices and norms
(ACLJAC137)

Understanding

Systems of language

Understand that hiragana symbols can be combined to represent words

Understand that vowel length can differentiate words in Japanese, for example, いいえiie for ‘no’ and いえie for ‘house’
(ACLJAU138)

Commence writing their own words, structures and phrases in hiragana with the support of a hiragana chart and word lists

Recognise and write frequently-used kanji

Learn to read and write words using hiragana
(ACLJAU139)

Notice and use context-related vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • using verbs in past tense
    ~ました/ませんでした
  • beginning to use counters in Japanese, for example, ~人、~さい、~月
  • indicating time and frequency using expressions such as まいにち、ときどき
  • telling time using ~じ/~じはん です
    なんじ ですか
  • understanding words and expressions indicating direction or means of transportation, for example,
    くるま で がっこう に いきます

Begin to develop a metalanguage in Japanese for talking about language, using terms similar to those used in English
(ACLJAU140)

Notice differences in familiar texts such as personal, informative and imaginative texts, and explain how particular features of such texts help to achieve their purpose
(ACLJAU141)

Language variation and change

Understand and demonstrate how language use varies according to the participants’ age, gender, relationship and the context of use, for example, おはよう/おはようございます;はし/おはし;
なまえ/おなまえ
(ACLJAU142)

Role of language and culture

Understand that Japanese is a standardised language and that there are different dialects spoken in different regions of Japan

Understand that Japanese borrows from and influences other languages
(ACLJAU143)

Make connections between culture and language use by identifying vocabulary and expressions that reflect different cultural values, traditions or practices
(ACLJAU144)

Achievement standard

At standard, students interact and socialise in Japanese with their teacher and each other through class experiences, activities and transactions, to exchange information about aspects of their personal worlds, daily routines at home and school and their interests. They use simple descriptive or expressive modelled language, with guidance, to provide information, ask questions and make statements, such asサッカー を しますか。いつ しますか。土よう日 に サッカー を します。Students locate, process and convey some factual information and simple statements from familiar texts related to their personal and social worlds. They view a range of imaginative texts, identifying most key words and some familiar phrases, cultural expressions and behaviours. They create and perform short imaginative texts, using familiar expressions, simple statements and modelled language. Students explain some features of Japanese language protocols such as the use of formulaic expressions, counter classifiers and the indication of politeness by using です. They use dictionaries with guidance, word lists and pictures to translate simple familiar texts. Students make some comments about how language reflects cultural practices and norms.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, explaining that hiragana symbols can be combined to represent words and that vowel length can differentiate words in Japanese. Students commence writing, with a satisfactory level of accuracy, their own words, structures and phrases in hiragana with visual supports. They write some frequently-used kanji and read and write words using hiragana with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use vocabulary and expressions, and apply elements of grammar, with a satisfactory level of accuracy, in simple spoken and written texts. They use verbs in the past tense ~ました/ませんでした and indicate time and frequency using expressions such as まいにち、ときどき. Students tell the time using ~じ/~じはん です なんじ ですか and use words and expressions indicating direction or means of transportation. They begin to describe how the Japanese language works, using terms similar to those used in English. Students make some simple comparisons between features of familiar texts and explain, with guidance, how particular features of such texts help to achieve their purpose. Students show how language use varies according to the participant, relationships and the context of use. They state, with guidance, that Japanese is a standardised language with regional dialects and lists its connections with several other languages. Students make some connections between language and culture use by identifying vocabulary and expressions that reflect different cultural values, traditions or practices.



Year 5 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 5 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Year 4 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understanding of Japanese language and culture.

Students communicate in Japanese, initiating interactions and socialising with the teacher and peers to exchange information about their home, neighbourhood and local community. They participate in guided tasks, planning outings or conducting performances and completing transactions. Students gather and convey information and ideas from a range of texts related to personal and social worlds. They engage with a range of imaginative texts and explore the characters, events and ideas in them. Students create and perform imaginative texts such as puppet shows or plays for a specific audience.

Students become familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, reading and writing all hiragana with the support of a chart and starting to use basic Japanese punctuation. They use context-related vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of the systematic nature of Japanese grammatical rules in simple spoken and written texts such as encouraging someone to join them in an activity using ~ましょう or describing the location of homes. Students build a metalanguage in Japanese to talk about language.

Students are encouraged to reflect on how their own and others’ ways of communicating and using language is shaped by the communities that they belong to.

In Year 5 students are widening their social networks, experiences and communication repertoires in both their first language and Japanese. They are supported to use Japanese as much as possible for classroom routines and interactions, structured learning tasks, and language experimentation and practice. English is predominantly used for discussion, clarification, explanation, analysis and reflection.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate interactions with the teacher and peers, using descriptive and expressive language to exchange information about their home, neighbourhood and local community, for example, うみ  に  いきました;たのしかった  です;へや に ふとん が あります;だいどころ に おかあさん が います;まっすぐ いって、みぎ に まがって、としょかん が
あります;がっこう に いきましょう;
はい、いきましょう/いいえ、ちょっと
(ACLJAC145)

Participate in guided tasks related to organising displays, planning outings and conducting events such as performances, or activities such as building models and completing transactions in places such as a café or a market
(ACLJAC146)

Informing

Gather and compare information and supporting details from a range of written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts, related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLJAC148)

Gather and convey information and ideas in different formats from a range of texts related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLJAC149)

Creating

Share responses to characters, events and ideas in imaginative texts such as anime, folk stories and manga, making connections with personal experiences and feelings
(ACLJAC150)

Create or reinterpret, present or perform imaginative texts for different audiences, based on or adapted from events, characters or settings in other imaginative texts
(ACLJAC151)

Translating

Collect, use and explain Japanese words and expressions that do not translate easily into English such as  おかえり;いらっしゃいませ;
ごちそうさま

Use visual, print or online dictionaries, word lists and pictures to translate simple familiar texts such as labels or captions
(ACLJAC152)

Reflecting

Compare ways of communicating in Australian and Japanese-speaking contexts and identify ways in which culture influences language use
(ACLJAC155)

Understanding

Systems of language

Pronounce all the sounds in the kana chart, including voiced and unvoiced sounds てんてん and まる, combined and long vowel sounds and double consonants, for example, きって and りょうり

Understand that the sounds of hiragana and katakana are identical, even though the associated scripts are different
(ACLJAU156)

Read and write all hiragana, including voiced, combined and long vowel sounds and double consonants using a hiragana chart for support

Understand the use of basic Japanese punctuation marks such as まる(。) and てん(、)

Read and write words, phrases and sentences using hiragana and simple kanji, for example, わたし の 本;わたし の かぞく です
(ACLJAU157)

Use context-related vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of the systematic nature of Japanese grammatical rules in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • using verbs to indicate – let’s…, ~ましょう
  • understanding and identifying elements of different sentence structures and the use of particles such as へ/で
  • understanding the use of ~が あります/
    いますto refer to inanimate/animate objects
  • describing locations of homes, people, animals and items, using basic structures, for example, noun は place に  あります; noun は place に います
  • knowing how to use prepositions to describe the position of objects, for example, つくえ の 上 に  本  が  あります
  • knowing how to use common counters and classifiers such as こ/ひき/びき/ぴき/えん
  • understanding Japanese numerical place order, for example 一、十、百、千、万
  • understanding different question words such as いくら/どれ

Build a metalanguage in Japanese to talk about language
(ACLJAU158)

Recognise the use of formulaic expressions, including the word order for writing the date and textual features in familiar texts such as opening and closing emails, letters, postcards, or telephone conversations
(ACLJAU159)

Language variation and change

Notice differences in interaction styles in situations in Japanese and Australian contexts, for example, in buying something from a shop
(ACLJAU160)

Role of language and culture

Understand that there are large Japanese-speaking communities in Hawaii and Brazil, and that Japanese is taught in many countries, including those in the Asia-Pacific region and is changing constantly due to contact with other languages
(ACLJAU161)

Reflect on how their own and others’ language use is shaped by and reflects communities’ ways of thinking and behaving and may be differently interpreted by others
(ACLJAU162)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate, with guidance, interactions in Japanese with their teacher and each other through guided tasks, class experiences, activities and transactions, to exchange information about their home, neighbourhood and local community. They use mostly familiar descriptive and expressive language to participate with guidance, in tasks or activities or to provide information, such asまっすぐ いって、みぎ に まがって、としょかん が. Students gather and compare most information and some supporting details, and convey information and ideas in different formats from a range of texts related to their personal and social worlds. They share simple responses to characters, events and ideas in imaginative texts and make simple connections with their own experience and feelings. They create and present, with guidance, imaginative texts for different audiences, based on or adapted from events, characters or settings. Students collect, use and explain Japanese words and expressions that do not translate easily into English. They use dictionaries, with guidance, word lists and pictures to translate simple familiar texts. Students identify ways in which culture influences language use, and provide simple examples when comparing ways of communicating in Australian and Japanese-speaking contexts.

Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, pronouncing all the sounds in the kana chart with a satisfactory level of accuracy and explaining that the sounds of hiragana and katakana are identical, even though the associated scripts are different. Using a hiragana chart, students read and write all hiragana with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They know and use, with guidance, basic Japanese punctuation marks. They read and write words, phrases and sentences using hiragana and simple kanji with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use vocabulary and expressions and develop and apply knowledge of the systematic nature of Japanese grammatical rules in simple spoken and written texts. They use verbs to indicate – let’s…, ~ましょう, identify elements of different sentence structures and the use of particles. They understand the use of ~が あります/ います to refer to inanimate/animate objects. Students use prepositions to describe the position of objects and describe locations of homes, people, animals and items, using basic structures, such as noun は place に  あります. Students use common counters and classifiers and understand Japanese numerical place order. They understand different question words such as いくら/どれ.They talk in Japanese, with guidance, about how the Japanese language works. They explain with guidance, the use of formulaic expressions and textual features in familiar texts. They discuss how their own and others’ language use is shaped by and reflects communities’ ways of thinking and behaving, and may be differently interpreted by others. They identify some ways that the Japanese language has changed over time through contact with other languages.



Year 6 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 6 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Year 5 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of Japanese language and culture. Students gain greater independence and become more conscious of their peers and social context. As they gain a greater awareness of the world around them they also become more aware of the similarities and differences between the Japanese language and culture and their own.

Students communicate in Japanese, initiating interactions with others to share information and relate experiences about free time. They collaborate with peers in guided tasks to plan events or activities or to showcase their progress in learning and using Japanese. Students gather, compare and respond to information and supporting details from a range of written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts related to their personal and social worlds and convey information, ideas and opinions, selecting appropriate texts to suit specific audiences and contexts. Students present and perform reinterpreted or created imaginative texts in Japanese.

Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, developing greater fluency and accuracy in communication. They begin to use Japanese spontaneously when interacting with one another and with their teacher and use an increasing range of body language and gestures. Students write simple texts using hiragana and kanji on familiar topics and recognise some single and whole word katakana with the support of a chart. They use context-related vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of the systematic nature of Japanese grammatical rules in simple spoken and written texts. Students build a metalanguage in Japanese to talk about language.

Students make connections between cultural practices, traditions and values and language use and reflect on how these impact on intercultural communication.

In Year 6 students continue to widen their social networks, experiences and communication repertoires in both their first language and Japanese. They are encouraged to use Japanese as much as possible for interactions, structured learning tasks and language experimentation and practice.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate interactions with others, using descriptive and expressive language to exchange information and relate experiences about free time and to show interest in and respect for them, for example,
サッカー を しますか;いつ しますか;
サッカー  が  とくい ですか;
けんくん は テニス が じょうずです;
父 は サッカー が とくい です

Negotiate an invitation for a shared experience, for example, 日よう日 に うみ に いきませんか;
いいえ、日よう 日 は ちょっと;
じゃあ、土よう日 に いきましょう
(ACLJAC145)

Collaborate with peers in guided tasks to plan events or activities to showcase their progress in learning and using Japanese, developing projects or budgeting for a shared event
(ACLJAC146)

Informing

Gather, compare and respond to information and supporting details from a range of written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts, related to their personal and social worlds
(ACLJAC148)

Convey information, ideas and opinions related to their personal and social worlds, selecting appropriate written, spoken, digital and multimodal texts to suit specific audiences and contexts
(ACLJAC149)

Creating

Share and compare key messages in imaginative texts, such as the moral of a folk story, ideas or values expressed in songs or characterisation in anime and compare their treatment across cultural contexts and time
(ACLJAC150)

Create or reinterpret, present or perform alternative versions of imaginative texts for different audiences, adapting stimulus, theme, characters, places, ideas and events to suit different modes or contexts
(ACLJAC151)

Translating

Demonstrate and explain elements of non-verbal Japanese communication that require interpretation for non-Japanese speakers, such as hand gestures, eye contact and counting systems

Experiment with bilingual dictionaries and/or online translators, considering relative advantages or limitations of each resource
(ACLJAC152)

Reflecting

Engage in intercultural experiences, describing aspects of language and culture that are unfamiliar and discussing their own reactions and adjustments
(ACLJAC155)

Understanding

Systems of language

Engage with authentic spoken language, recognising how words blend

Understand the relationship between sounds, words and meaning such as noticing that certain combinations of two moras make one rhythm unit (foot), for example, the copula です and the verb suffix ます
(ACLJAU156)

Recognise and make meaning of some single and whole word katakana with the support of a katakana chart

Apply the basic principles of stroke order to write all hiragana and high-frequency kanji

Write simple texts using hiragana and kanji on familiar topics
(ACLJAU157)

Use context-related vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of the systematic nature of Japanese grammatical rules in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes, including:

  • using verbs to indicate – Would you…?
    Shall we …? ~ませんか; ~ましょうか
  • understanding the use of これ/それ/あれ/どれ
  • using the verb て form as a formulaic expression, such as when giving instructions or seeking permission, for example, 見てください;トイレ に いっても いい ですか
  • knowing how to use common counters and classifiers such as こ/ひき/ まい/ ぴき/えん
  • using conjunctions such as そして、それから to link ideas

Build a metalanguage in Japanese to talk about language
(ACLJAU158)

Apply formulaic expressions and understand the significance of textual features in texts such as letters or telephone conversations and how the composition of texts reflects cultural values
(ACLJAU159)

Language variation and change

Understand that language use reflects respect and social distance such as expressing familiarity with friends by using first names instead of surnames or showing respect for authority figures, for example,

しつれいします;よろしく おねがいします
(ACLJAU160)

Role of language and culture

Explore how the Japanese language is both influenced by and in turn influences other languages and cultures, for example, in relation to food, music, sport and technology
(ACLJAU161)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate, with guidance, interactions in Japanese with others through class experiences, activities and transactions, to exchange information and relate experiences about free time, such as サッカー  が  とくい ですか;けんくん は テニス が じょうずです and to show interest in and respect for them, using mostly descriptive and expressive language. Students collaborate with peers in guided tasks to plan events or activities to showcase their progress in learning and using Japanese, developing projects or budgeting for a shared event. They share and compare some key messages in imaginative texts such as the moral of a story, ideas or values expressed, or characterisation and, with guidance, compare their treatment across cultural contexts and time. They create or present, occasionally with guidance, simple alternative versions of imaginative texts for different audiences, adapting elements for different modes or contexts. They demonstrate and explain, with guidance, simple elements of non-verbal Japanese communication that require interpretation for non-Japanese speakers, such as hand gestures, eye contact and counting systems. Students experiment with and discuss the usefulness of various forms of dictionaries. They engage in intercultural experiences, describing some aspects of language and culture that are unfamiliar, and discuss their own reactions and adjustments.

Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the Japanese language, engaging with authentic spoken language with guidance, sometimes recognising how words blend. They describe the relationship between sounds, words and meaning; stating that certain combinations of two moras make one rhythm unit. Students distinguish and comprehend few single and whole word katakana with support of a katakana chart. They apply, with guidance, the basic principles of stroke order to write most hiragana and high-frequency kanji and write, with guidance, simple texts using hiragana and kanji on familiar topics, with some inaccuracies. They use vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of the systematic nature of Japanese grammatical rules, with a satisfactory level of accuracy, in simple spoken and written texts. Students use verbs to indicate – Would you …? or Shall we …? ~ませんか; ~ましょうか. They explain the use of これ/それ/あれ/どれ and use the verb て form as a formulaic expression, such as when giving instructions or seeking permission. They use common counters and classifiers and conjunctions such as そして、それから to link ideas. Students talk in Japanese about how the Japanese language works. They apply formulaic expressions with satisfactory accuracy and mostly understand the significance of textual features and how the composition of texts reflect cultural values. Students discuss how the Japanese language is both influenced by and, in turn, influences other languages and cultures, and explain how language and culture are integral to the nature of identity and communication.



Year 7 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 7 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Year 6 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of Japanese language and culture. Some students begin Year 7 with proficiency in languages other than Japanese and bring existing language learning strategies and intercultural awareness to the new experience of learning Japanese. Their growing textual knowledge, developed through English literacy, supports their developing Japanese literacy. Skills in analysing, comparing and reflecting on language and culture in both languages are mutually supportive.

Students communicate in Japanese, initiating and participating in spoken and written interactions with peers and known adults to talk about, give opinions and share their thoughts on people, social events and school experiences. They engage in tasks and activities that involve planning events or experiences and negotiating arrangements. Students read, view and interact with a growing range of short texts for a variety of informative, transactional and communicative purposes. They engage with a range of imaginative texts, expressing opinions and ideas about the themes and values in the texts and exploring the techniques that are used to connect with the audience. Students create and perform imaginative texts such as songs, plays or short stories.

Students better understand the systems of the Japanese language, learning to read and write all katakana characters and further developing their understanding of the relationship between how hiragana, katakana and kanji are used in texts. They understand and control context-related vocabulary and develop understanding of how to control elements of the Japanese grammatical system including understanding the functions of the particles が, を, に, と, で, へ, ~から, ~まで using them to form sentences. Students continue to build a metalanguage in Japanese to describe and increase control of grammatical concepts and language elements.

In Year 7 students make comparisons between their own language(s) and Japanese, and reflect on the experience of moving between languages and cultural systems. The practice of reviewing and consolidating prior learning is balanced against the provision of engaging and relevant new experiences and connections.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate and participate in spoken and written interactions with peers and known adults, using rehearsed descriptive and expressive language to talk about, give opinions, share thoughts and feelings on people, social events and school experiences, for example, パースのなつはとてもあついですよ;あのレストランはおいしいです。
だから、いきましょう。;わたしはうちからがっこうまであるきます。でも、友だちはバスで行きます。
(ACLJAC163)

Engage in tasks and activities that involve planning, such as hosting a Japanese class or visitor, an excursion to a Japanese restaurant, or preparing for a real or virtual event, trip or excursion, considering options, negotiating arrangements and participating in transactions, for example, 六時半に学校であいましょう;バスでえんそくに行きます
(ACLJAC164)

Informing

Access and summarise key information and supporting details from texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds
(ACLJAC166)

Organise and present information and ideas on texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, using descriptive and expressive language and modes of presentation to suit different audiences and contexts
(ACLJAC167)

Creating

Respond to a range of imaginative texts by expressing opinions about the themes and key ideas, values and techniques used to engage and entertain audiences
(ACLJAC168)

Create and present simple, individual and shared imaginative texts such as songs, poems, plays or stories that involve imagined characters, places and experiences, to entertain peers and younger audiences
(ACLJAC169)

Translating

Translate texts and compare their own translation to classmates’, noticing when it is difficult to transfer meaning from one language to the other
(ACLJAC170)

Reflecting

Interact and engage with members of the
Japanese-speaking community to share and compare aspects of culture that affect communication and notice how their own culture impacts on language use, for example, ways of expressing feelings or politeness protocols associated with social events.

Consider how their biography, including personal experiences, family origins, traditions and beliefs, interests and experience, influences their identity and communication
(ACLJAC172) (ACLJAC173)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise that katakana is used for loan words, and that these words must be pronounced within the combinations of available Japanese sounds

Recognise that in the copula desu and the verb suffix masu, the ‘u’ is devoiced in normal speech
(ACLJAU174)

Recognise all katakana, including voiced, unvoiced, contracted and blended sounds using the kana chart

Write words and phrases using both kana and kanji, for example, 大きい車; 小さい木

Use furigana to support the reading of unfamiliar kanji
(ACLJAU175)

Understand and control context-related vocabulary and develop understanding of how to control elements of the Japanese grammatical system, including;

  • understanding the different functions of a range of particles such as が (topic marker), を (object marker), に (time, date, place, destination, for)
    と (and, with), で (location, action, means),
    へ (direction, destination), ~から ~まで (from, as far as, distances)
  • describing daily routines and schedules for a week, using a range of particles to form sentences, for example, 六時にうちで兄とごはんを食べます
  • using い and な adjectives in the present tense in negative forms, for example, おいしくないです;しずかじゃないです
  • using noun phrases with an adjective, for example, きれいなうみです;おいしいレストランです
  • understanding that the exact word order of noun phrases is not important as long as they appear before the verb and are accompanied by correct particles
  • understanding the role of sentence-ending particles in conversation, such as ね for confirming or expecting a response and よ for emphasis
  • using adverbs as formulaic expressions, for example, いつも、ときどき
  • creating cohesion and flow by using conjunctions, for example, でも
  • understanding how to indicate politeness using ご and お prefixes, for example, お名前;先生のごかぞく

Continue to build a metalanguage in Japanese to describe and increase control of grammatical concepts and language elements
(ACLJAU176)

Language variation and change

Understand variations in Japanese language use that reflect different levels of formality, authority and status
(ACLJAU178)

Understand that the Japanese language has evolved and developed through different periods of influence and change
(ACLJAU179)

Role of language and culture

Understand that Japanese language and culture, like all languages and cultures, are interrelated, both shaping and reflecting each other
(ACLJAU180)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in spoken and written interactions in Japanese with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to exchange information on people, social events and school experiences. They use rehearsed descriptive and expressive language to talk about, give some opinions and share thoughts and feelings, such asパースのなつはとてもあついですよ。 Students engage in the planning of Japanese events or activities by considering options, negotiating arrangements and participating in transactions. They identify and summarise most key information and some supporting details, and they organise and present information and ideas on texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, using rehearsed descriptive and expressive language, and modes of presentation to suit audiences and contexts. Students express simple opinions and describe some of the themes and key ideas, values and techniques in a range of imaginative texts. They create and present simple, individual and shared imaginative texts with imagined characters, places and experiences, to entertain peers and younger audiences. Students translate texts, with some inaccuracies, and compare their own translation to peers’, noticing when it is difficult to transfer meaning from one language to the other. They interact and engage with Japanese speakers to share and compare some aspects of culture that affect communication, and notice how their own culture impacts on language use. Students consider how their biography influences their identity and communication.

Students better understand the system of the Japanese language, recognising that katakana is used for loan words, and that these words must be pronounced within the combinations of available Japanese sounds. They identify that in the copula desu and the verb suffix masu, the ‘u’ is devoiced in normal speech. Students identify some katakana, including voiced, unvoiced, contracted and blended sounds using the kana chart. They write, accurately, some words and phrases using both kana and kanji. Students use furigana to support the reading of unfamiliar kanji, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students understand the different functions of a range of particles and describe daily routines and schedules for a week, using a range of particles to form sentences. They use い and な adjectives in the present tense in negative forms and use noun phrases with an adjective. Students understand that the exact word order of noun phrases is not important as long as they appear before the verb and are accompanied by correct particles. They understand the role of sentence-ending particles in conversation, such as ね for confirming or expecting a response and よ for emphasis. Students use adverbs as formulaic expressions, create cohesion and flow by using conjunctions, and understand how to indicate politeness using ご and お prefixes. Students describe how the Japanese language works, using some relevant metalanguage to describe grammatical concepts and language elements. They discuss how and why different scripts are used in different types of texts. Students identify variations in Japanese language use that reflect different levels of formality, authority and status. They describe some ways in which that Japanese language has evolved and developed through different periods of influence and change. Students identify that Japanese language and culture are interrelated, both shaping and reflecting each other.



Year 8 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 8 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Year 7 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of Japanese language and culture. Students may need encouragement to take risks in learning a language at this stage of social development and to consider issues of how the experience impacts on the sense of ‘norms’ associated with their first language and culture.

Students communicate in Japanese, initiating and maintaining spoken and written interactions with peers and known adults to discuss and share ideas, views and experiences of significant events, special occasions or milestones. They engage in activities that involve planning experiences and activities that require negotiating and solving problems. They also participate in transactions that involve purchasing goods and services. Students read, view and interact with a growing range of texts for a variety of informative, transactional and communicative purposes. They respond to a range of imaginative texts, analysing ideas, themes, values and techniques that are used to engage and entertain the audience. Students create and present a range of simple texts that involve imagined contexts and characters such as raps, poems and cartoons.

Students better understand the systems of the Japanese language, developing proficiency in reading and writing sentences and short texts written in hiragana, katakana and simple kanji. They demonstrate increased control of context-related vocabulary and elements of the Japanese grammatical system including using both affirmative and negative forms of particular grammatical elements in different tenses and use conjunctions such as だから、それで、それに to express a range of ideas and experiences in written and spoken forms. Students continue to build a metalanguage in Japanese to describe and increase control of grammatical concepts and language elements.

Students monitor and reflect on their intercultural experience and capability as language learners, and identify their personal and community practices that reflect cultural influences.

In Year 8 students are supported to develop increasing autonomy as language learners and users, to
self-monitor and peer-monitor and to adjust language in response to their experiences in different contexts. Japanese language is being used in more extended and elaborated ways for classroom interactions and routines, task participation and structured discussion.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate and maintain spoken and written interactions with peers and known adults, using both rehearsed and spontaneous language to discuss and share ideas, views, opinions and experiences of significant social events, special occasions or milestones, for example, ボクシングデーにかいものに行きます。だから、はやくおきます。
(ACLJAC163)

Engage in tasks that involve planning of experiences and activities, such as a birthday party, Christmas or New Year’s Eve festivities, or community festivals, considering options, negotiating arrangements, solving problems and participating in transactions that include purchasing goods and services, for example,イースターにビーチに行きましょうか。ビーチは、ちょっと…; キャンプはどうですか。;このT シャツはL サイズですね。ちょっと 大きい です。M サイズをください。
(ACLJAC164)

Informing

Access, summarise and share key ideas from a range of texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds and present them in different formats for the intended audience
(ACLJAC166)

Organise and present information and ideas to raise awareness of and inform others about texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, using descriptive and expressive language to compare perspectives and experiences
(ACLJAC167)

Creating

Respond to a range of imaginative texts, analysing ideas, themes, values and techniques used to engage and entertain audiences and make connections with personal experiences and other imaginative texts in their own language and culture
(ACLJAC168)

Create and present a range of simple texts that involve imagined contexts and characters such as raps, poems, picture books or cartoons, selecting appropriate language, rhythms and images to enrich the visual or listening experience
(ACLJAC169)

Translating

Translate and interpret texts, including those that use language with colloquial or cultural association, and consider why there might be differences in interpretation and how language reflects elements of culture
(ACLJAC170)

Reflecting

Participate in intercultural interactions, with members of the Japanese-speaking community to discuss cultural practices, demonstrating awareness
of the importance of shared understanding and reflecting on adjustments made as a result of reactions and responses.

Consider how their own biography influences their identity and communication and shapes their own intercultural experiences
(ACLJAC172) (ACLJAC173)

Understanding

Systems of language

Understand that katakana is used for loan words and use available combinations of katakana to experiment with Japanese pronunciation of unfamiliar loan words, for example, ホワイトボード
(ACLJAU174)

Read and write all katakana, including voiced, unvoiced, contracted and blended sounds using the kana chart

Understand the relationship in texts between hiragana, katakana and kanji
(ACLJAU175)

Increase control of context-related vocabulary and elements of the Japanese grammatical system to express a range of ideas and experiences in written and spoken forms, including:

  • using verbs to indicate – I want to ~たいです
  • using い and な adjectives in present and past tenses in negative forms such as たのしくなかったです/しずかじゃなかったです
  • using both affirmative and negative forms of particular grammatical elements in different tenses
  • creating cohesion and flow by using conjunctions, for example, だから、それで、それに
  • using counter classifiers, for example,
    ~時、~分、~つ、~まい、~本
  • using superlatives, for example,
    一ばん好きです
  • using adverbs and intensifiers such as
    ぜんぜん、たいてい

Continue to build a metalanguage in Japanese to describe and increase control of grammatical concepts and language elements
(ACLJAU176)

Identify the structures and key features of familiar texts in Japanese, such as announcements, tickets, advertisements, public signs or manga, to explain the relationship between the language and structure used and the purpose of the text
(ACLJAU177)

Language variation and change

Apply variations in Japanese language use that reflect different levels of formality, authority and status
(ACLJAU178)

Understand that Japanese, like other languages, is constantly expanding to include new words and expressions in response to influences such as globalisation and exposure to other languages and cultures
(ACLJAU179)

Role of language and culture

Analyse the ways in which choices in everyday Japanese language use reflect cultural practices and values
(ACLJAU180)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and maintain spoken and written interactions in Japanese with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to exchange information on significant social events, special occasions or milestones. They use mainly rehearsed and some spontaneous descriptive and expressive language to discuss and share ideas, views, opinions and experiences, such asイースターにビーチに行きましょうか。Students participate in the planning of experiences and activities by considering options, negotiating arrangements, solving problems and participating in transactions. Students summarise and share most key ideas and some information from a range of texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, and present them in different formats for the intended audiences. They organise and present key information on texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, and make simple comparisons of perspectives and experiences. Students analyse key ideas, themes, values and techniques used to engage and entertain audiences in a range of imaginative texts. They make some connections with personal experiences and other imaginative texts in their own language and culture. Students create and present a range of simple texts with imagined contexts and characters, selecting mostly appropriate language, rhythms and images to enrich the visual or listening experience. Students translate and interpret texts, with some accuracy, including those that use language with colloquial or cultural association. They consider why there might be differences in interpretation and how language reflects elements of culture. Students participate in intercultural interactions with Japanese speakers, begin to describe cultural practices, demonstrate awareness of shared understanding and reflect on adjustments made as a result of reactions and responses. They also consider how their biography influences their identity and communication, and shapes their own intercultural experiences.

Students better understand the systems of the Japanese language, describing that katakana is used for loan words and using some available combinations of katakana to experiment with Japanese pronunciation of unfamiliar loan words. They read and write, accurately, some katakana, including voiced, unvoiced, contracted and blended sounds, using the kana chart. Students identify the relationship in texts between hiragana, katakana and kanji. They use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use verbs to indicate I want to ~たいです and use い and な adjectives in present and past tenses in negative forms, such as たのしくなかったです/しずかじゃなかったです. They use both affirmative and negative forms of particular grammatical elements in different tenses, and create cohesion and flow by using conjunctions, for example, だから、それで、それに. Students use counter classifiers, superlatives, adverbs and intensifiers, such as ぜんぜん、たいてい. They discuss how the Japanese language works, using relevant metalanguage to describe grammatical concepts and language elements. Students identify most of the structures and key features of familiar texts in Japanese, and discuss the relationship between the language and structure used, and the purpose of the text. Students describe variations in Japanese language use that reflect different levels of formality, authority and status. They discuss that Japanese, like other languages, is constantly expanding to include new words and expressions in response to influences, such as globalisation and exposure to other languages and cultures. Students analyse the ways in which choices in everyday Japanese language use reflect cultural practices and values.



Year 9 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 9 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Year 8 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of Japanese language and culture.

Students communicate in Japanese, initiating and participating in sustained interactions to share, compare and justify personal opinions about aspects of childhood, teenage life and relationships. They have a growing repertoire of formulaic expressions that are essential for everyday Japanese interactions. Japanese is also used to engage in shared activities such as planning and managing an event or experience. Students analyse ideas and information from a range of texts, identifying context, purpose and intended audience. They convey information and ideas and offer their own views on texts, using appropriate formats and styles of presentation. Students discuss how imaginative texts reflect Japanese cultural values or experiences. They create and present imaginative texts designed to engage different audiences that involve moods and effects.

Students understand the systems of the Japanese language, increasing control of context-related vocabulary and achieving a higher level of sophistication of expression through mastering the use of the plain form of verbs and the use of the verb て form. They build on their mastery of hiragana and katakana and understand sound variation in the pronunciation of borrowed words. Students further develop a metalanguage in Japanese to describe and increase control of grammatical concepts and language elements and to organise learning resources.

Students increasingly monitor language choices when using Japanese, considering their own and others’ responses and reactions in intercultural communication, questioning assumptions and values and taking responsibility for modifying language and behaviours in relation to different cultural perspectives.

In Year 9 learning is characterised by consolidation and progression. Students are provided with new challenges and engage in some independent learning experiences, always supported by modelling, scaffolding and monitoring.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate and participate in sustained interactions, using informative and descriptive language, to share, compare and justify personal opinions about aspects of their childhood, teenage life and relationships, for example, 九年生のキャンプでゲームをしたり、おいしい食べものを食べたりします。; 五才の時から、バレエをしています。しょうらい、ダンサーになりたいです。
(ACLJAC181)

Engage in shared activities such as planning and managing activities, events or experiences, exchanging resources and information, for example, plan a display or performance to illustrate their memories of aspects of their childhood, for example, 一番たのしかったりょこうについて、おしえてください;きょねん、マーガレットリバーに行って、ともだちとキャンプをしました。
(ACLJAC182)

Informing

Analyse ideas and information from a range of texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, identifying context, purpose and intended audience
(ACLJAC184)

Convey information and ideas and offer their own views on texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds, using appropriate formats and styles of presentation
(ACLJAC185)

Creating

Discuss how imaginative texts reflect Japanese cultural values or experiences through structure, language and mood, to build action, develop character and position the reader/audience
(ACLJAC186)

Create and present imaginative texts designed to engage different audiences that involve moods and effects, for example, poems, songs, monologues or dialogues, animated stories or short films
(ACLJAC187)

Translating

Translate and/or interpret a range of texts and discuss how to convey concepts that do not translate easily across different linguistic and cultural contexts
(ACLJAC188)

Reflecting

Monitor language choices when using Japanese, considering their own and others’ responses and reactions in intercultural communication, questioning assumptions and values and taking responsibility for modifying language and behaviours in relation to different cultural perspectives.

Reflect on cultural differences between Japanese-language and English-language communication styles and on how these affect intercultural interactions
(ACLJAC190) (ACLJAC191)

Understanding

Systems of language

Understand the basic intonation and phrasing patterns of spoken Japanese, taking the form of a down turning curve, and applying it when speaking

Identify the use of rising intonation when asking questions in casual speech or ましょう form, for example, 食べる? /食べましょうか
(ACLJAU192)

Convey meaning by appropriately selecting and combining hiragana, katakana and kanji characters

Use understanding of hiragana to predict meaning of unknown words
(ACLJAU193)

Increase control of context-related vocabulary and understand how sophistication in expression can be achieved by:

  • understanding and applying the rules of the plain form and knowing that the basic form of all Japanese verbs ends in -u, -eru or -iru, the forms they are listed under in dictionaries
  • understanding that verbs can be divided into three groups according to the way they are conjugated, 五だん verb (five-step verbs), 一だん verb (one-step verbs) and irregular verbs
  • using character charts as a systematic framework for recognising patterns for verb conjugation and applying the formation rules of each verb group
  • using verb て form to connect events, for example, 朝おきてジョギングをします
  • understanding and using the different functions of verb て form
  • using present continuous tense using verb
    ています, for example, ラジオを聞いています
  • using verb stems with grammatical features such as ~に行きます。
  • expressing number of actions, for example,
    たり~たりします
  • using adverbs as formulaic expressions, for example, 早く、おそく
  • increasing cohesion within paragraphs by using conjunctions, for example, ですから

Further develop a metalanguage to describe and increase control of grammatical concepts and language elements and to organise learning resources such as verb charts and lists of vocabulary and sentence structures
(ACLJAU194)

Compare textual features and conventions used in Japanese and English media texts such as slogans, public signs, emails, songs and conversations and notice how the choice of language and structure work to achieve each text’s purpose
(ACLJAU195)

Language variation and change

Analyse variations in language use that reflect different social and cultural contexts, purposes and relationships
(ACLJAU196)

Explore changes to both Japanese and Australian English and identify reasons for these changes such as education, media and new technologies, popular culture and intercultural exchange
(ACLJAU197)

Role of language and culture

Understand that the Japanese language carries embedded cultural information and assumptions that can be difficult for speakers of other languages to interpret
(ACLJAU198)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate, in part, and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in Japanese with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to exchange information on aspects of childhood, teenage life and relationships. They use familiar descriptive and some expressive language to share, compare and justify personal opinions, such as 九年生のキャンプでゲームをしたり、おいしい食べものを食べたりします。Students engage in shared activities, such as the planning and managing of activities, events or experiences, exchanging resources and information. Students analyse ideas and most information and, in part, identify context, purpose and intended audience, from a range of texts related to aspects of their personal and social worlds. They convey information and ideas and offer their views on texts, using some appropriate formats and styles of presentation. Students provide examples of how imaginative texts reflect Japanese cultural values or experiences through structure, language and mood, to build action, develop character and position the reader or audience. They create and present simple imaginative texts with moods and effects, in order to engage different audiences. Students translate and/or interpret, with some accuracy, a range of texts, and discuss how to convey concepts that do not translate easily across different linguistic and cultural contexts. Students monitor their language choices when using Japanese and, at times, consider their own and others’ responses and reactions in intercultural communication. They question some assumptions and values and occasionally modify language and behaviours in relation to different cultural perspectives. Students reflect on cultural differences between Japanese-language and English-language communication styles and discuss how these affect intercultural interactions.

Students better understand the system of the Japanese language, identifying the basic intonation and phrasing patterns of spoken Japanese, taking the form of a downward curve, and applying it when speaking, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They identify and sometimes use rising intonation when asking questions in casual speech or ましょう form. Students convey meaning by appropriately selecting and combining hiragana, katakana and kanji characters and use understanding of familiar kanji to predict meaning of unknown words, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students understand and apply the rules of the plain form and know that the basic form of all Japanese verbs ends in -u, -eru or -iru, the forms they are listed under in dictionaries. They understand that verbs can be divided into three groups according to the way they are conjugated, 五だん verb (five-step verbs), 一だん verb (one-step verbs) and irregular verbs. Students use character charts as a systematic framework for recognising patterns for verb conjugation and applying the formation rules of each verb group. They use verb て form to connect events and understand and use the different functions of verb て form. Students use present continuous tense using verb ています, and use verb stems with grammatical features, such as ~に行きます。They express number of actions, for example, たり~たりします, use adverbs as formulaic expressions and increase cohesion within paragraphs by using conjunctions. Students describe grammatical concepts and language elements, using relevant metalanguage to organise resources. They compare textual features and conventions used in Japanese and English media texts, and identify how the choice of language and structure work to achieve each text’s purpose. Students analyse some variations in language use that reflect different social and cultural contexts, purposes and relationships. They explore changes to both Japanese and Australian English, and identify reasons for these changes. Students explore how the Japanese language carries embedded cultural information and assumptions that can be difficult for speakers of other languages to interpret.



Year 10 Syllabus

Year Level Description

Year 10 Japanese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the Japanese language developed in Year 9 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of Japanese language and culture. Students require continued guidance and mentoring at this stage of their language learning, but work increasingly independently to analyse, reflect on and monitor their language learning and intercultural experiences. They are considering future pathways and prospects, including how the Japanese language may feature in these.

Students communicate in Japanese, initiating and participating in sustained interactions in formal and informal exchanges to discuss young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues. They also compare and evaluate ideas and information on contemporary culture and social issues from a range of perspectives. They convey information, comments and experiences on texts, using different modes of presentation to achieve different purposes. Students explore imaginative texts such as poems, songs and dance and identify humorous or emotional elements that reflect cultural values or norms. They create and present a range of imaginative texts on themes of personal or social relevance.

Students understand the systems of the Japanese language, developing a broader knowledge of vocabulary and producing sophisticated language related to requesting and giving permission and expressing opinions, intentions and thoughts, utilising the plain form. They use character charts as a systematic framework for recognising patterns for verb conjugation and apply the formation rules of each verb group. Students also use a greater number of kanji and increasingly apply their understanding of known kanji to predict the meaning of unfamiliar words. They further develop a metalanguage to describe and increase control of grammatical concepts and language elements and to organise learning resources such as verb charts and lists of vocabulary and sentence structures.

Students reflect on the experience of learning and using Japanese, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility for contributing to mutual understanding by modifying language and behaviours in relation to cultural perspectives.

In Year 10 students are challenged with more independent learning experiences, however, these experiences continue to be supported with scaffolding and monitoring.

Communicating

Socialising

Initiate and participate in sustained interactions, using descriptive and expressive language in formal and informal exchanges to discuss young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues, for example, 日本のリサイクルはかなりきびしいです。けれども、かんきょうにいいと思います。; J-pop と K-pop にきょうみがありますから、しょうらい、日本とかん国に行くつもりです。

Express feelings and justify opinions, for example,  あ、それはいいですね;どう思いますか;それはどうですか
(ACLJAC181)

Sustain and extend exchanges about contemporary culture and social issues, for example, differences between school and house rules in Australia and Japan, part-time jobs, to raise awareness, exchange resources and information, solve problems and manage diverse views, for example,

食べ物をのこすのはもったいないです;日本では家の中でくつをはいてはいけません
(ACLJAC182)

Informing

Compare and evaluate ideas and information from a range of perspectives on contemporary culture and social issues, identifying how context and culture affect how information is presented
(ACLJAC184)

Convey information, comments, perspectives and experiences on different contemporary culture and social issues, using different modes of presentation to suit different audiences or to achieve different purposes
(ACLJAC185)

Creating

Identify how imaginative texts create humorous, emotional or aesthetic effects that reflect cultural values or experiences, such as poems, songs, dance, street art and performance
(ACLJAC186)

Create and present a range of imaginative texts on themes of personal or social relevance, to express ideas or to reflect cultural values, social issues or experiences
(ACLJAC187)

Translating

Consider the nature of translating and interpreting, explaining how cultural perspectives and concepts have been represented when transferring meaning from one language to another, for example, おじゃまします
(ACLJAC188)

Reflecting

Reflect on the experience of learning and using Japanese, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility for contributing to mutual understanding, by modifying language and behaviours in relation to cultural perspectives

Explore and express their own cultural identity and ability to act as a cultural mediator between Japanese speakers and Australians
(ACLJAC190) (ACLJAC191)

Understanding

Systems of language

Recognise multiple readings of familiar kanji in different compounds, for example, オーストラリア人、やさしい人、三人、新しい、新聞、聞きます
(ACLJAU192)

Use knowledge of familiar kanji to predict meaning of unknown words
(ACLJAU193)

Increase control of context-related vocabulary and understand how sophistication in expression can be achieved by:

  • using character charts as a systematic framework for recognising patterns for verb conjugation and applying the formation rules of each verb group
  • requesting and giving permission and expressing prohibition using verb て form, for example,
    ~てもいいです;~てはいけません;~てはだめです
  • using verb stems with grammatical features such as ~やすい/にくいです
  • exploring how to use plain forms in authentic contexts such as conversations with peers, for example, 食べる?/見る?
  • expressing opinions, intentions and thoughts using the plain form, for example, plain verb つもりです, verb /adjective とおもいます
  • using adverbs and intensifiers such as かなり
  • increasing cohesion within paragraphs by using conjunctions, for example, それに、それで
  • indicating the status of actions using adverbs such as まだ and もう
  • understanding the concept of uchi-soto 内と外 for making appropriate choices of register, for example, 食べる?/食べますか?

Further develop a metalanguage to describe and increase control of grammatical concepts and language elements and to organise learning resources such as verb charts and lists of vocabulary and sentence structures
(ACLJAU194)

Identify, analyse and compare textual features and conventions in Japanese and English texts that characterise social and informative media
(ACLJAU195)

Language variation and change

Analyse variations in language use that reflect different social and cultural contexts, purposes and relationships
(ACLJAU196)

Explain changes to Japanese and other languages and cultures and understand that language use has the power to influence social and cultural relationships and practices
(ACLJAU197)

Role of language and culture

Explore cultural concepts embedded in Japanese language that embody core values and behaviours and for which there is no direct English translation
(ACLJAU198)

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in Japanese with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to exchange information on young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues. They use familiar descriptive and expressive language in formal and informal exchanges to express feelings and justify personal opinions, such as 日本のリサイクルはかなりきびしいです。 Students sustain, and sometimes extend, interactions to exchange resources and information, solve problems and manage diverse views. Students compare and evaluate some ideas and information from a range of perspectives, identifying how context and culture affect how information is presented. They use modes of presentation, appropriate to audiences or purposes, to convey information, comments, perspectives and experiences on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. Students explain how humorous, emotional or aesthetic effects are used in imaginative texts to reflect cultural values or experiences. They create and present simple imaginative texts on familiar personal or social themes that express ideas or that reflect cultural values, social issues or experience. Students describe how cultural perspectives and concepts have been represented when translating and interpreting from one language to another. They describe the experience of learning and using Japanese, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility by modifying language and behaviours. They also explore and express their own cultural identity and ability to act as a cultural mediator between Japanese speakers and Australians.

Students better understand the systems of the Japanese language, identifying some multiple readings of familiar kanji in different compounds. They use understanding of familiar kanji to predict meaning of unknown words, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use character charts as a systematic framework for recognising patterns for verb conjugation and applying the formation rules of each verb group. Students request and give permission and express prohibition using verb て form and use verb stems with grammatical features, such as ~やすい/にくいです. Students explore how to use plain forms in authentic contexts, such as conversations with peers, and express opinions, intentions and thoughts using the plain form, for example, plain verb つもりです, verb/adjective とおもいます. They use adverbs and intensifiers, such as かなり, and increase cohesion within paragraphs by using conjunctions. Students indicate the status of actions using adverbs, such as まだ and もう, and understand the concept of uchi-soto 内と外 for making appropriate choices of register. Students describe grammatical concepts and language elements, using relevant metalanguage to organise resources. They identify, analyse and compare some textual features and conventions in Japanese and English texts that characterise social and informative media. Students analyse, in part, and explain variations in language use that reflect different social and cultural contexts, purposes and relationships. They describe changes to both Japanese and other language and culture, and identify how language use has the power to influence social and cultural relationships and practices. Students explore how the Japanese language carries embedded cultural information and assumptions that can be difficult for speakers of other languages to interpret.



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