Year 2 SyllabusTest

Filters

Curriculum updated: .

Show/Hide Curriculum

Year Levels

Strands

General Capabilities

Cross-curriculum Priorities

Year 2 Syllabus

Year Level Description

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. Together, the strands focus on developing students' knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit and strengthen these as needed.

In Year 2, students communicate with peers, teachers, students from other classes and community members.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is to entertain, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These encompass traditional oral texts, picture books, various types of print and digital stories, simple chapter books, rhyming verse, poetry, non-fiction, film, multimodal texts, dramatic performances and texts used by students as models for constructing their own work.

The range of literary texts for Pre-primary to Year 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia.

Literary texts that support and extend Year 2 students as independent readers involve sequences of events that span several pages and present unusual happenings within a framework of familiar experiences. Informative texts present new content about topics of interest and topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. These texts include language features such as varied sentence structures, some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high-frequency sight words and words that need to be decoded phonically, and a range of punctuation conventions, as well as illustrations and diagrams that support and extend the printed text.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts including imaginative retellings, reports, performances, poetry and expositions.

Language

Language variation and change

Understand that spoken, visual and written forms of language are different modes of communication with different features and their use varies according to the audience, purpose, context and cultural background (ACELA1460)

Language for interaction

Understand that language varies when people take on different roles in social and classroom interactions and how the use of key interpersonal language resources varies depending on context (ACELA1461)

Identify language that can be used for appreciating texts and the qualities of people and things (ACELA1462)

Text structure and organisation

Understand that different types of texts have identifiable text structures and language features that help the text serve its purpose (ACELA1463)

Understand how texts are made cohesive through language features, including word associations, synonyms, and antonyms (ACELA1464)

Recognise that capital letters signal proper nouns and commas are used to separate items in lists (ACELA1465)

Know some features of text organisation including page and screen layouts, alphabetical order, and different types of diagrams, for example timelines (ACELA1466)

Expressing and developing ideas

Understand that simple connections can be made between ideas by using a compound sentence with two or more clauses usually linked by a coordinating conjunction (ACELA1467)

Understand that nouns represent people, places, concrete objects and abstract concepts; that there are three types of nouns: common, proper and pronouns; and that noun groups/phrases can be expanded using articles and adjectives (ACELA1468)

Identify visual representations of characters’ actions, reactions, speech and thought processes in  narratives, and consider how these images  add to or contradict or multiply the meaning of accompanying words (ACELA1469)

Understand the use of vocabulary about familiar and new topics and experiment with and begin to make conscious choices of vocabulary to suit audience and purpose (ACELA1470)

Phonics and word knowledge

Orally manipulate more complex sounds in spoken words through knowledge of blending and segmenting sounds, phoneme deletion and substitution in combination with use of letters in reading and writing (ACELA1474)

Understand how to use knowledge of digraphs, long vowels, blends and silent letters to spell one and two syllable words including some compound words (ACELA1471)

Build morphemic word families using knowledge of prefixes and suffixes (ACELA1472)

Use knowledge of letter patterns and morphemes to read and write high-frequency words and words whose spelling is not predictable from their sounds (ACELA1823)

Use most letter-sound matches including vowel digraphs, less common long vowel patterns, letter clusters and silent letters when reading and writing words of one or more syllable (ACELA1824)

Understand that a sound can be represented by various letter combinations (ACELA1825)

Literature

Literature and context

Discuss how depictions of characters in print, sound and images reflect the contexts in which they were created (ACELT1587)

Responding to literature

Identify aspects of different types of literary texts that entertain, and give reasons for personal preferences (ACELT1590)

Examining literature

Discuss the characters and settings of different texts and explore how language is used to present these features in different ways (ACELT1591)

Identify, reproduce and experiment with rhythmic, sound and word patterns in poems, chants, rhymes and songs (ACELT1592)

Creating literature

Create events and characters using different media that develop key events and characters from literary texts (ACELT1593)

Innovate on familiar texts by experimenting with character, setting or plot (ACELT1833)

Literacy

Texts in context

Discuss different texts on a similar topic, identifying similarities and differences between the texts (ACELY1665)

Interacting with others

Listen for specific purposes and information, including instructions, and extend students’ own and others' ideas in discussions (ACELY1666)

Use interaction skills including initiating topics, making positive statements and voicing disagreement in an appropriate manner, speaking clearly and varying tone, volume and pace appropriately (ACELY1789)

Rehearse and deliver short presentations on familiar and new topics (ACELY1667)

Interpreting, analysing, evaluating

Identify the audience of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts (ACELY1668)

Read less predictable texts with phrasing and fluency by combining contextual, semantic, grammatical and phonic knowledge using text processing strategies, for example monitoring meaning, predicting, rereading and self-correcting (ACELY1669)

Use comprehension strategies to build literal and inferred meaning and begin to analyse texts by drawing on growing knowledge of context, language and visual features and print and multimodal text structures (ACELY1670)

Creating texts

Create short imaginative, informative and persuasive texts using growing knowledge of text structures and language features for familiar and some less familiar audiences, selecting print and multimodal elements appropriate to the audience and purpose (ACELY1671)

Re-read and edit text for spelling, sentence-boundary punctuation and text structure (ACELY1672)

Write legibly and with growing fluency using unjoined upper case and lower case letters (ACELY1673)

Construct texts featuring print, visual and audio elements using software, including word processing programs (ACELY1674)

Year 2 Achievement Standard

Handwriting behaviours will not be described in the year level achievement standard or the writing assessment pointers. A resource is currently being developed to support teachers to monitor students’ handwriting behaviours.

Reading and Viewing

At Standard, students understand how similar texts share characteristics by identifying text structures and language features used to describe characters and events, or to communicate factual information. They read texts that contain varied sentence structures, some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high-frequency sight words and images that provide extra information. They monitor meaning and self-correct using knowledge of phonics, syntax, punctuation, semantics and context. They use knowledge of a wide variety of letter-sound relationships to read words of one or more syllables with fluency. They identify literal and implied meaning, main ideas and supporting detail. Students make connections between texts by comparing content. They explain their preferences for aspects of texts using other texts as comparisons.

Writing and Creating

Students create texts, drawing on their own experiences, their imagination and information they have learnt. They create texts that show how images support the meaning of the text. Students accurately spell words with regular spelling patterns and spell words with less common long vowel patterns. They use punctuation accurately.

Speaking and Listening

Students listen for particular purposes. They listen for and manipulate sound combinations and rhythmic sound patterns. When discussing their ideas and experiences, students use everyday language features and topic-specific vocabulary. They explain their preferences for aspects of texts using other texts as comparisons. Students create texts that show how images support the meaning of the text. They create texts, drawing on their own experiences, their imagination and information they have learnt. Students use a variety of strategies to engage in group and class discussions and make presentations.



Year Level Description

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. Together, the strands focus on developing students' knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit and strengthen these as needed.

In Year 2, students communicate with peers, teachers, students from other classes and community members.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is to entertain, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These encompass traditional oral texts, picture books, various types of print and digital stories, simple chapter books, rhyming verse, poetry, non-fiction, film, multimodal texts, dramatic performances and texts used by students as models for constructing their own work.

The range of literary texts for Pre-primary to Year 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia.

Literary texts that support and extend Year 2 students as independent readers involve sequences of events that span several pages and present unusual happenings within a framework of familiar experiences. Informative texts present new content about topics of interest and topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. These texts include language features such as varied sentence structures, some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high-frequency sight words and words that need to be decoded phonically, and a range of punctuation conventions, as well as illustrations and diagrams that support and extend the printed text.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts including imaginative retellings, reports, performances, poetry and expositions.

Back to top of page